Yeah Yeah Yeahs Guitarist Nick Zinner Displays Photos at Lethal Amounts Nov. 20

Posted by Amoebite, November 11, 2015 01:21pm | Post a Comment

nick zinner lethal amountsAmoeba is proud to present “601 Photographs,” a solo exhibition of photography by Yeah Yeah Yeahs guitarist Nick Zinner at Lethal Amounts gallery in Downtown Los Angeles. The opening reception for the showing will be Friday, November 20 at 7 p.m., and it’s free.

Anyone who’s been to a Yeah Yeah Yeahs show is probably familiar with Zinner’s habit of snapping a photo of the audience in between shredding. Now you can see Zinner’s images from tours around the world, from his time touring with YYY’s and other projects around six continents for 15-plus years.

The show’s 601 images act as both voyeuristic and documentarian, capturing everything from hotel beds to intimate portraits and those infamous crowd shots. The exhibit has previously been shown in New York City, Mexico City, San Francisco and Tokyo.

Zinner is far from a dabbler in photography. Zinner has studied photography at Bard College with Larry Fink and Stephen Shore, and has published four books of his photography, the most recent one being Please Take Me Off The Guest List.

Lethal Amounts gallery focuses on subversive and counter culture themes throughout history, addressing the social and artistic value of underground movements while highlighting taboo topics. It is located at 1226 W 7th St. in Downtown L.A.


Mick Rock's David Bowie Photo Book 'The Rise of David Bowie' on Sale From Amoeba

Posted by Billy Gil, October 21, 2015 06:55pm | Post a Comment

david bowie photo book taschen mick rockMick Rock’s massive tome of a photo book on David Bowie is now for sale at Amoeba Music.

The tall,16-pound book features a hologram cover and more than 300 pages of photographs. It sells for $700, but it’s limited to only 1,972 copies, signed by Rock and Bowie. Look for the book in the display case next to the counters at Amoeba Hollywood!

Rock famously shot many musicians during the 1970s, from Lou Reed to Queen and Blondie’s Debbie Harry. Between 1972 and 1973, Rock was Bowie’s official photographer, while Bowie was taking the world by storm with his celebrated album Hunky Dory and his emerging Ziggy Stardust persona.

The book includes pictures for press and album jackets along with intimate backstage photos, around 50 percent of which are said to be unseen by the public.

The book sale coincides with the exhibition “Mick Rock: Shooting for Stardust. The Rise of David Bowie & Co.” at TASCHEN Gallery, which is located at 8070 Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles. The exhibit runs through Oct. 30.

Read an interview with Rock about his time photographing Bowie via Rolling Stone. See a couple of photos from the book below. Shop more collectible books from Amoeba here.

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Show Recap: Savage Republic at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Billy Gil, January 31, 2013 07:05pm | Post a Comment

Savage Republic VarvakiosL.A. art-punk band Savage Republic have always existed on the fringe, but they've managed to hold on to that fringe well past their '80s supposed heyday. They reformed to release 2007's fine 1938 album and now have released Varvakios, recorded in Greece using field recordings, traditional Greek instruments and the band's own apocryphal noise.

The band's show at Amoeba Hollywood Jan. 30 showed just how much fervor the band has, tearing through "1938" with its ominous opening lines "Wave of destruction, a wave of aggression, it's 1938 all over again" over searing, reverbed guitars and tribal drum beats. The band's percussionist/singer Ethan Port bumped into me from behind on his way to the stage, playing maracas over the din. Port banged on a tin-sounding box that added a desolate thump to the songs, beating it like he was leading a viking ship. The band traded instruments and vocal duty, with guitarist/bassist Thom Fuhrmann handling deeply intoned vocal declarations and Port barking like a barbarian. They played the Ceremonial record's gorgeous "Year of Exile," which led into the chaos of Furhmann beating his bass in unison with drummer Mark Erskine's rumbling roar before going back to the song's rubbery bassline. The band thanked Amoeba for having "a bunch of old guys" play, but they rocked like dudes half their age.

See all the photos from the in-store here.

Savage Republic at Amoeba Hollywood

Show Recap: Local Natives at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Billy Gil, January 30, 2013 03:55pm | Post a Comment

Local Natives AmoebaThe line wrapped around the block to see Local Natives play one of the biggest Amoeba in-stores in recent memory.

The L.A.-based band appeared Jan. 29 in support of their sophomore album, the epic Hummingbird, released the same day. Despite having released only one previous album, Gorilla Manor, in 2009, it was clear by the shouts of screaming girls and dudes alike that the band’s cult has grown sizably over the years.

Local Natives HummingbirdThe band opened with “You & I,” the majestic opening track of Hummingbird, with singer Kelcey Ayer booming his throaty voice through the store in the song’s opening lines and the band engaging in solid harmonies. “Breakers” sounded intense live, inspiring a clap-along.

From the get-go, it didn’t sound as though the band needed time to find their footing or were still trying to work out kinks in new songs; they sounded well-rehearsed and ready to go. They paused to sweetly give a shoutout to their hometown, offering gratitude and reflecting on the times they were on the other side of the stage.

In an offering to their fans, they launched into “Wide Eyes” from Gorilla Manor, a song they’re probably sick-to-death of playing, to huge response — a kind move in a show meant to promote their new album. They moved back to Hummingbird for standout “Heavy Feet,” which features some of the liveliest drumming and singing on the album, doubling that strength live in the show’s best moment.

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Show Recap: FIDLAR at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Billy Gil, January 25, 2013 04:45pm | Post a Comment

FIDLAR AmoebaLA’s FIDLAR ripped through most of their new self-titled album at Amoeba Hollywood Jan. 24 with hardly a pause for breath.

From the outset, when they broke into the four-chord, “I’m Not Your Steppin’ Stone”-style stomp of “Stoked and Broke,” things were loud, loud, loud. That continued through the next couple of songs on their album, the breakneck-speed “White on White” and quirky surf riffery of “No Waves.” It was a shame that you could hear barely a word of vocals from the band and its two singers, Zac Caper and Elvis Kuehn, whose true-to-life detailing of being in your mid-20s, in a band, without a proper job and getting drunk every night is a big part of FIDLAR’s appeal. Musically, though, the band never faltered, inducing trance with the looped opening notes of “Whore” before smashing through the song’s nasty, Sabbathy punk rock. Things came through loud-and-clear enough for the band’s shout along chorus to closer “Cheap Beer,” echoed by the sizable audience: “I! Drink! Cheap! Beer! So! What! Fuck! You!”

The show was a perfect example of FIDLAR’s ethos (“Fuck it Dawg, Life’s a Risk,” is what their name stands for). They don’t play the volume they should. They don’t wait to make sure their vocals are loud enough or fuss with the sound guy. They just play. And the kids went wild.

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