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Music History Monday: May 19

Posted by Jeff Harris, May 19, 2014 09:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: May 19, 1945 - Singer, songwriter and musician Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend in Chiswick, London, UK. Happy 69th Birthday, Pete!
 


Born on this day: May 19, 1948 - Singer, songwriter, model, and actress Grace Jones (born in Spanish Town, Jamaica). Happy 66th Birthday, Grace!
 


Born on this day: May 19, 1951 - Ramones lead vocalist Joey Ramone (born Jeffry Ross Hyman in Forest Hills, NY). Happy Birthday to this punk rock icon on what would have been his 63rd Birthday.
 


On this day in music history: May 19, 1972Honky Chateau, the fifth studio album by Elton John is released. Produced by Gus Dudgeon, it is recorded at the Chateau d'Herouville in Herouville, France in January 1972. It will be the first full album to feature John recording with his road musicians bassist Dee Murray, drummer Nigel Olsson, and guitarist Davey Johnstone, setting the template for his most successful work during the 70's. The album will differ from his previous work as it is the first to not feature a string section since his debut release Empty Sky (though it will feature violin player Jean-Luc Ponty on two tracks). Chateau will also be the last Elton John album to be released on the Uni Records imprint in the US and Canada, as the label will be absorbed into MCA. It will spin off two singles including "Honky Cat" (#8 US Pop, #31 UK), and "Rocket Man" (#6 US Pop, #2 UK). Honky Château will spend five weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200, peaking at number two on the UK album chart, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: April 21

Posted by Jeff Harris, April 21, 2014 10:30am | Post a Comment


To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.


Born on this day: April 21, 1959 - Singer, songwriter and founder of The Cure, Robert Smith (born Robert James Smith in Blackpool, UK). Happy 55th Birthday, Robert!
 


On this day in music history: April 21, 1958 - "Twilight Time" by The Platters hits #1 on the Billboard Best Sellers chart for one week, also topping the R&B Best Sellers chart for three weeks on April 28, 1958. Written by Buck Ram, Al Nevins, Morton Nevins, and Artie Dunn, it is the third pop and fourth R&B chart-topper for the Los Angeles-based vocal group. The song is originally recorded in 1944 by The Three Suns and by big band leader Les Brown. When The Platters record it in early 1958, it will initially be the B-side of "Out Of My Mind." American Bandstand host Dick Clark prefers "Twilight" and begins heavily plugging it on the show, making it the A-side by default. Entering the Best Sellers chart at #7 on April 14, 1958, it will leap to the top of the chart the following week. The single will sell over 1.5 million copies by the time it tops the charts,  The success of the record will be significant as more than 90% of its sales on the 7" 45 RPM format, leading The Platters label Mercury Records to phase out the manufacturing of the 10" 78 RPM record, the format that had dominated the music industry for the first half century of its existence. "Twilight Time" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: September 17

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 17, 2012 02:15pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 17, 1967 - The Who appear on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour on the CBS television network, performing "I Can See For Miles" and "My Generation" (taped on September 15th). It is the band's first US television appearance following their star-making performance at the Monterey International Pop Festival in June. Prior to the taping, drummer Keith Moon will pack one of his bass drums with an explosive charge to set off at the end of "My Generation." He fails to tell anyone that he has used several times the normal amount of explosives. When Moon detonates the charge, there will be a massive explosion that engulfs the stage in smoke, causing one of his drum cymbals to shatter, cutting him on his arm and leg when he is hit by the flying shrapnel. Guitarist Pete Townshend is closest to the blast when it goes off, singeing his hair and causing him significant hearing loss. Actress Bette Davis, one of the other guests on the show that night will pass out from shock backstage into actor Mickey Rooney's arms (also appearing on the show), after seeing how Keith Moon is injured in the blast.


On this day in music history: September 17, 1967 - The Doors make their first and only on The Ed Sullivan Show performing their recent #1 hit "Light My Fire." Executives from CBS' Standards & Practices (i.e. network censors) will ask the band to change the line "girl we couldn't get much higher" to "girl we couldn't get much better," feeling the original line might be offense to some parts of the viewing audience. Lead singer Jim Morrison will agree to sing the altered line but when the band performs the song on the live broadcast, Morrison will sing the line as it was originally written, even emphasising it the second time he sings it. This will infuriate Sullivan and the network who had planned to have The Doors make another six appearances on the show, are immediately cancelled. When a show producer tells them they'll never appear on the show again, Morrison reportedly tells him, "Hey man. We just did the Sullivan Show.