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Peter Hook (Joy Division, New Order) at the Jewish Community Center of San Francisco!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 7, 2013 01:49pm | Post a Comment

Join Amoeba Music, Boing Boing, Noisepop, and the Jewish Community Center of San Francisco on peter hookThursday, January 31st in welcoming legendary bassist Peter Hook of Joy Division and New Order to the Jewish Community Center of San Francisco! Mr. Hook will interview live that evening with David Pescovitz, Co-Editor of Boing Boing, and sign his new book Unknown Pleasures: Inside Joy Division.

Godfathers of alternative rock, Joy Division, reinvented music in peter hook unknown pleasures inside joy divisionthe post-punk era, creating a dark, hypnotic, and intense sound that has influenced rock ever since. Founding member Peter Hook’s propulsive bass guitar melodies came to define an era and inspire a generation. After iconic lead singer Ian Curtis’s suicide, the remaining members went on to form New Order, creators of synth-pop and one of the most critically acclaimed and influential bands of the 1980s.

Amoeba Music is proud to be in attendance with an Amoeba Pop-Up Shop, providing copies of the new book for sale as well as loads of CDs, vinyl, DVDs, and t-shirts sure to captivate Joy Division and New Order fans!

This event is FREE but Advance reservations are required. Call 415-292-1233 or email Arts@jccsf.org. More info HERE!

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The '80s List: Part 8

Posted by Amoebite, August 29, 2011 02:32pm | Post a Comment
OnJoan Jette day at Amoeba Hollywood I proclaimed that Aztec Camera's 1983 release High Land, Hard Rain was one of the best records of the '80s. This single statement eventually led to over 200 Amoebites ranking their top 10 favorite albums from the ‘80s.

From the beginning we realized that it was impossible for most of us to condense our favorites from all genres into a tiny top ten list. So, we limited our lists to Rock/Pop and its sub-genres like punk, metal, goth, and new wave. Even so, it was a difficult selection process because not only are there hundreds of amazing records to consider, there is also the added dynamic of time.

The '80s were a long time ago and the music has had many years to gestate. We have a deep sense of nostalgia and sentiment with these albums as our fondest memories are associated with them. These are albums we LOVE.

- Henry Polk

P.S. We'll be posting new additions to the '80s list project from Amoeba staff members on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. See all entries in our '80s list series.

P.P.S. The '80s List Book is available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood.


Kristen Frederick
The Dream SyndicateThe Days Of Wine & Roses (1982)
The Clash London Calling (1980)
The SmithsThe Smiths (1983)
Roxy Music Avalon (1980)
Ultravox – Vienna (1980)
The WaterboysA Pagan Place (1984)
Echo & BunnymenPorcupine (1983)
The Psychedelic FursTalk Talk Talk (1981)
New OrderPower, Corruption & Lies (1983)
OMD – Architecture & Morality (1981)

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The 80s List: Part 3

Posted by Amoebite, August 17, 2011 04:31pm | Post a Comment
Black FlagOne day at Amoeba Hollywood I proclaimed that Aztec Camera's 1983 release High Land, Hard Rain was one of the best records of the '80s. This single statement eventually led to over 200 Amoebites ranking their top 10 favorite albums from the ‘80s. 

From the beginning we realized that it was impossible for most of us to condense our favorites from all genres into a tiny top ten list. So, we limited our lists to Rock/Pop and its sub-genres like punk, metal, goth, and new wave
Even so, it was a difficult selection process because not only are there hundreds of amazing records to consider, there is also the added dynamic of time. 

The '80s were a long time ago and the music has had many years to gestate. We have a deep sense of nostalgia and sentiment with these albums as our fondest memories are associated with them. These are albums we LOVE.

-  Henry Polk

P.S. We'll be posting new additions to the '80s list project from Amoeba staff members on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. See all entries in our ‘80s list series

P.P.S. The '80s List Book is available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood.


Alyssa Siegel
The ReplacementsTim (1985)
X –  More Fun In The New World (1983)
R.E.M. – Murmur (1983)
PixiesDoolittle (1989)
The FeeliesThe Good Earth (1985)
Rockpile - Seconds Of Pleasure (1980)
Nick HaeffnerThe Great Indoors (1987)
Chris StameyIt’s Alright (1987)
The Gun ClubFire Of Love (1981)
Tom Petty & The HeartbreakersHard Promises (1981)

SF DJ Dance Party Temptation Pays Tribute to Manchester's Rich Musical Legacy

Posted by Billyjam, December 18, 2010 11:23am | Post a Comment
"And God Created Manchester (Pt 1)" from Rock Family Trees

As the above excerpt from the the Rock Family Trees series about the history of the Manchester music scene (see Pt 2 and Pt 3) nicely outlines, and as most of us Smiths/Joy Division etc. fans already well know, Manchester, England has an incredibly rich musical legacy. It spans several decades with a seemingly never ending stream of talented bands and artists including (to name but a handful) New Morrissey, Manchester UnitedOrder, The Stone Roses, James, 808 State, The Durutti Column, The Happy Monday, The Inspiral Carpets, The Fall, Autechre, The Ting Tings, and Herman's Hermits.

Also well aware of this are the music loving folks who throw the ongoing Bay Area electro/80's/indie/goth themed Temptation party. So for tonight's (sure to be hella fun) Temptation party at Cat Club, the theme is Manchester and that's what the DJs will be spinning all night long. I caught up with Temptation DJ/promoter DJ Damon, who co-produces the Bay Area club night with Dangerous Dan and Skip, and who holds a special place in his heart for Manchester's rich musical history to ask him about tonight's party and Manchester music in general.

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out this week 6/29 & 7/6...thieves like us...scissor sisters...delphic...trash humpers...

Posted by Brad Schelden, July 9, 2010 11:55am | Post a Comment

It has been almost a year and a half since the release of the debut album by Thieves Like Us. I'm still in love with that first album, Play Music. It just doesn't get much better than that. Records tend to get overplayed and then you sort of move on and get over them. It might happen for some fans with just certain songs... you sort of wear them out and there is always a new song around the corner to catch your ear. But some songs never get old and you never tire of listening to them. There have been certain albums that I have liked so much but ended up taking an intentional break from -- I had to sort of cut them off because I knew I would wear them out! Itthieves like us play music is like too much of a good thing. Sometimes you have to take a break from your favorite things just to keep them your favorite things. Music is often like this for me. I really almost wore out the album by The Teenagers a couple of years ago. And I almost wore out my Thieves Like Us album. Luckily there have been some great albums this year to keep me busy! I am still not nearly done with the Wild Nothing album but I now listen to it about once a week instead of every day. I was so in love with Thieves Like Us last year that it ended up at the top of my favorite albums of 2009, so I was obviously excited about this new album that just came out this week. It did surprise me a bit a couple of weeks ago when I first heard that they had a new album coming out already -- I didn't know if I was ready yet. I really was not quite done with the first album -- but I quickly got myself ready. This involved listening to the first album one more time and then doing some cleansing. I had heard the new record was going to be a different type of album for them, which was good news. I didn't want the first album replicated or replaced. I was ready for a brand new album from one of my new favorite bands.

Much of my youth was spent exploring older albums by my favorites. I didn't start listening to The Smiths until after I had bought my first solo Morrissey album. It is always fun to go back and explore the older albums of your new favorite bands or artists because they usually get better when you go backwards in a discography. My first cassette by The Smiths was Louder Than Bombs. I then picked up a copy of Strangeways Here We Come. Then it was Queen Is Dead followed by Meat Is Murder and the self titled debut. I bought Rank on cassette I think next because I found it a a record store and realized it was the only album I didn't own by them. I think The cassettesSmiths were the first band that I owned the full catalog of on cassette -- at least everything that I could find at the record store. I of course later updated to CDs and LPs. The same thing happened with most of my other favorite bands. I think Blue Bell Knoll was my first Cocteau Twins album and Into the Labyrinth was my first Dead Can Dance album. Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me was my first album by The Cure. It just all depends how old you were when these albums first came out, how cool your older brothers or sisters or cousins were, what albums your best friends listened to, or even when your radio station decided to start playing certain bands. At this point in my life I have pretty much explored all the albums of the bands that I already like or am ever gonna like, but luckily I still do love new music, so it is exciting to find a new band that you can follow from the beginning. Sometimes though I wonder if it is better to go backwards. It does always seem like the albums get better when you go backwards. Early New Order is obviously better as ythieves like us posterou go backwards.

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