New Mac DeMarco Mini-LP Up For Preorder

Posted by Billy Gil, April 22, 2015 09:37am | Post a Comment

Our favorite songsmith in goofball’s clothing Mac DeMarco has announced a new, eight-song mini-LP called Another One. It’s due Aug. 7 on Captured Tracks, and you can preorder it on LP or CD now.

DeMarco’s extended tour includes a stop in S.F. for Outside Lands Aug. 8.

mac demarco another one lpHere’s the tracklist for Another One:

1 The Way You'd Love Her
2. Another One
3. No Other Heart
4. Just Put Me Down
5. A Heart Like Hers
6. I've Been Waiting For Her
7. Without Me
8. My House by the Water

He announced the new album through a silly home video filmed by his girlfriend, Kiera McNally. Watch below via Pitchfork.


Album Picks: Drake, Built to Spill, Wire, Girl Band, L'Orange, Peach Kelli Pop

Posted by Billy Gil, April 21, 2015 09:59am | Post a Comment

Drake If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late

drake if you're reading this it's too late cdDespite being labeled a “mixtape,” Drake’s fourth album, finally out physically, is yet another slice of excellence from the Toronto rapper. Opener “Legend” again details Drake’s meteoric rise along the lines of Nothing Was the Same’s “Started From the Bottom” (“If I die, I’m a legend,” he declares after detailing his successes) over a spare, ghostly beat. But it’s never all about braggadocio with Drake, as paranoid lyrics like “it’s so hard for me to let new people in” seep in. That continues onto single “Energy,” with its refrain “got a lotta enemies” and lines like “I got girls in real life tryin’ to fuck up my day/Fuck goin’ online, that ain’t part of my day.” Drake gets a lot of grief for complaining, but he’s also his own worst enemy and critic, calling himself out for “thinking about money and women 24/7” on “Know Myself” in a way that helps make him more compelling. Those other Drake complaints—that he’s not hard enough, that he’s not the best pure rapper—are routinely silenced by the pure quality of tracks like “Madonna,” a perfect example of how Drake’s unique cadences and lyrical candidness more than make for any perceived weaknesses. If You’re Reading This doesn’t have a crossover track with appeal approaching megahit “Hold On, We’re Going Home,” but Drake doesn’t really need that at this point to make a strong album, and the production across the album is stellar nonetheless, freeing Drake and his collaborators to focus in on what makes him sound great rather than individual tracks. No-nonsense beats by Boi-1da jibe well with PartyNextDoor’s codeine-fueled productions, among others who worked on the album. If You’re Reading This’ 17 tracks run long without the bigger production of a similarly long album like Take Care, but there aren’t really any weak songs, either. Latter-half tracks like his back-and-forth with Lil Wayne (who’s in fine form here) on “Used To,” the reflective raps on “Now & Forever” over Eric Dingus’ “Trap House 3 Remix” (no, that’s not Grimes) and suddenly animated closer “6PM in New York” all count as highlights. However much If You’re Reading This might be a smaller release between blockbusters, it feels as essential as anything Drake has done.

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Album Picks: Earl Sweatshirt, Calexico, Pale Blue

Posted by Billy Gil, April 14, 2015 09:10am | Post a Comment

Earl Sweatshirt - I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside

earl sweatshirt i don't like shit i don't like to go outside lpOdd Future cohort Earl Sweatshirt can be forgiven for his claustrophobic album title. At only 16, he was plucked from his budding rap career by his mother, responding to his drug use and poor grades, and sent to a reform school in Samoa. Since returning, he’s talked about having a tumultuous time partying on tour and struggling to get his life and health back. The result of all that back and forth is I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside, and album that doubles down on the grim paranoia set forth by his last album, the excellent Doris. Earl has a way of expressing his pain honestly while keeping his rhymes engaging instead of seeming like a diary pour—“ Picked the road that got twists/I'm holding my dick and playing cautious,” he says on “Mantra.” On the grim “Faucet,” he raps about not knowing where to call home and who to call a friend (“I feel like I'm the only one pressin' to grow upwards”). The stunning “Grief” offers imagery of Earl facing panic attacks, grabbing for the Xanax bottle and reminiscing about drugs and girls on tour over a murky beat but ultimately coming out of the haze, finishing off with the lines, “I just want my time and my mind intact/When they both gone, you can't buy ’em back.” I Don’t Go Outside is focused nearly to a fault, but in keeping the album as variations on a theme, it helps further establish Earl as a compelling character—the tortured wayward son, reveling in and revolted by his own hedonism—crafting a potent statement in the process. The distilled paranoia of I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go Outside easily makes for one of the most memorable hip-hop albums of the year.

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Album Picks: Waxahatchee, Toro y Moi, Kelela

Posted by Billy Gil, April 7, 2015 10:32am | Post a Comment

Waxahatchee - Ivy Tripp

waxahatchee ivy tripp lpKatie Crutchfield’s Waxahatchee project has grown from the home recordings of a promising young singer/songwriter to the full-bodied sound we hear on Ivy Tripp. Over a river of fuzz and organ drone, Crutchfield sings more warmly and confidently than ever on opener “Breathless.” Lyrically she can be oblique on songs like “Poison” (“Your birthday party tongue dripping/You'll summarize/Travel the world ivy tripping”), but the scenes she paints are evocative nonetheless. She pushes her sound further into brightly hued Pavement-style indie rock on tracks like “Under a Rock” and ’80s college rock on “The Dirt” while expanding it with a simple electronic beat and catchy backup vocals on “La Loose.” But some of the most stirring moments on Ivy Tripp are its sparest, as she turns staring at the ceiling midday and turning over love and life choices into Ivy Tripp’s best track, “Stale By Noon,” singing over a simple organ lick. I wasn’t sold when I heard her last album, Cerulean Salt, but Ivy Tripp feels whittled down to perfection. It’s an impressive songwriting showcase for Crutchfield and a significant leap forward.

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Album Picks: Sufjan Stevens, Lower Dens, Death Grips, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, The Soft Moon, Male Gaze

Posted by Billy Gil, March 31, 2015 11:30am | Post a Comment

Sufjan Stevens - Carrie & Lowell

sufjan stevens carrie lowell lp“Death With Dignity” opens Carrie & Lowell as a touching elegy to Sufjan Stevens’ mother, yet it also could describe his relationship to his own music. “I don’t know where to begin,” he sings, and “I’ve got nothing to prove” over a familiar bed of bluegrass-inspired folk. Stevens was like the A-plus student of indie pop, turning out album after album of perfectly manicured orchestral folk-pop, but I felt like he lost his way a bit with The BQE, an album and project that felt unwieldy, as well the hectic electro-folk of The Age of Adz. Carrie & Lowell, by comparison, is one of his most stripped-down albums to date. That’s not to say it doesn’t have his trademark fixation on detail— songs shift halfway through, like “Should Have Known Better’s” turn into stuttering, laptoppy acoustics and choral touches, or “Drawn to the Blood’s” extended string finale; “you checked your text while I masturbated,” he sings casually, telling a girl she looks like Poseidon in the sexually turbulent “All of Me Wants All of You.” Lyrically and musically, Stevens remains a curious tinkerer, but Carrie & Lowell never feels busy in the slightest. It’s an intensely focused work, one that places Stevens’ voice and songcraft over bells and whistles. Whereas locations and history seemed to hold Stevens’ interest in the past, here he’s death-obsessed (and still spiritual as ever). “Fourth of July” feels romantically morbid and carries the happy refrain “we’re all gonna die,” and on “The Only Thing,” he sounds stricken with grief to the point of barely being able to keep going on. Stevens’ way with language, drawing on mythology and Christian imagery, and ascendant voice keeps the songs from wallowing too deeply, even as they describe an immense sense of loss, allowing those moments when he does break—“No Shade in the Shadow of the Cross’” “Fuck me, I’m falling apart”—to land all the more effectively. Without the filter of a state’s history or the heavy religiosity of Seven Swans, Carrie & Lowell finds Stevens turning his studious eye inward to fully explore his own grief, and the results are never short of breathtaking.

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