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Music History Monday: August 18

Posted by Jeff Harris, August 18, 2014 10:42am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: August 18, 1956 - "Don't Be Cruel/Hound Dog" by Elvis Presley hits #1 on the Billboard Best Sellers chart for 11 weeks. It is third chart-topping single for Presley. Penned by songwriter Otis Blackwell ("Great Balls Of Fire," "All Shook Up," "Return To Sender"), the track is recorded at RCA Studios in New York on July 2, 1956, with the master version being the 28th take. The single is released 11 days later on July 13th and is an immediate smash. Technically the B-side of the single, it will be listed along with "Hound Dog" beginning the week of August 11,1956 when it reaches #2, then topping the chart the following week. The double A-sided single's run at the top of the charts is unprecedented in the era. The record will remain unbroken until 1992 when "End Of The Road" by Boyz II Men holds the number one spot for 13 weeks. "Don't Be Cruel" is certified 4x Platinum in the US by the RIAA and is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2002.
 


On this day in music history: August 18, 1978Who Are You, the eighth studio album by The Who is released. Produced by The Who, Jon Astley, and Glyn Johns, it is recorded at Rampart Studios in Battersea, London; Olympic Studios and RAK Studios in St. John's Wood, London; and Pete Townshend's home studio in Going-on-Thames, London from October 1977 - April 1978. Issued three years after their last studio album The Who By Numbers, it will be the final album to feature original drummer Keith Moon, who will die of an accidental drug overdose just three weeks after its release. It will spin off two singles including "Trick Of The Light" and the title track (#14 Pop). In 1996, the album will be remixed and remastered (by Jon Astley), with the reissue containing five bonus tracks. Who Are You will peak at number two on the Billboard Top 200, number six on the UK album chart, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: August 4

Posted by Jeff Harris, August 4, 2014 11:03am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: August 4, 1901 - Jazz music icon Louis Armstrong (born in New Orleans, LA). Happy Birthday to one of the greatest musicians that ever lived. Love you, Pops!
 



On this day in music history: August 4, 1958 - "Poor Little Fool" by Ricky Nelson hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks. Written by Sharon Sheeley, it is the first chart-topping single for the teenaged star of the hit television series The Adventures Of Ozzie And Harriet. Songwriter Sharon Sheeley (girlfriend of musician Eddie Cochran) will write "Fool" after the break up of her relationship with Don Everly of The Everly Brothers. The track is initially released as part of a four-song 7" EP when it begins to receive airplay. Imperial Records head Lew Chudd will have the song rush released as a single against Nelson's wishes. Since the singer has the right to approve of artwork used on his records, he will not grant permission for the single to be packaged with a picture sleeve (his only Imperial single released without a picture sleeve) to show his disapproval. The song will also be the first number one single on the newly dubbed "Hot 100" chart, previously known as the Best Sellers chart. "Poor Little Fool" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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Music History Monday: July 28

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 28, 2014 07:00am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: July 28, 1979 - “Good Times” by Chic hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for six weeks, also topping the Hot 100 for one week on August 18, 1979. Written and produced by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers, it is the second R&B and pop chart-topper for the seminal New York City-based R&B band led by musician and producers Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers. Like many of Chic's other hit singles, lyrically they will seem quite ambiguous on the surface, but in truth will often mask a much more profound and deeper meaning within the lyrics. The duo will refer to their songs having a "deep hidden meaning" behind them. Edwards and Rodgers will base "Good Times" conceptually on depression era pop songs like “Happy Days Are Here Again” and “About A Quarter To Nine,” juxtaposing them with the state of the late 70’s economy and the unbridled hedonism of the "Disco Era," making a veiled statement about people’s need to escape and to forget about their troubles. That concept will even extend to the packaging of the accompanying album Risque, which will feature the members of the band posed in a sepia toned black & white photograph depicting that bygone era. Released as a single on June 4, 1979, "Good Times" will be an immediate smash, both on the dance floor and on the radio. It will go on to become one of the most influential records of the late 20th century and beyond when it also becomes a cornerstone of Hip-Hop culture. Its innovative bassline will be used as the basis for the Sugarhill Gang’s “Rapper’s Delight,” as well as spawning numerous songs either directly copying or influenced by it. "Good Times" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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Music History Monday: July 14

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 14, 2014 08:05am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: July 14, 1967 - Bee Gees 1st, the US debut album by The Bee Gees, is released. Produced by Robert Stigwood and Ossie Byrne, it is recorded at IBC Studios in London from March 7 - April 14, 1967. Following their breakthrough success with their 12th single release "Spicks And Specks" (#3 AUS Pop) in Australia in late 1966, The brothers' father Hugh will send demo tapes of their work to Beatles manager Brian Epstein. Epstein will pass the tapes on to Robert Stigwood (Cream), who will invite the band to come to England in February of 1967 to audition for him. Impressed by what he hears, Stigwood will become the band's manager, with The Bee Gees moving to the UK. He will secure them recording contracts with Polydor Records in the UK and Atlantic Records subsidiary Atco in the US. The album is actually the third full-length release by the band, but is their first to be released internationally. It will spin off three singles including "New York Mining Disaster 1941" (#14 Pop) and "To Love Somebody" (#17 Pop), the latter of which is originally intended for Otis Redding. The album's cover is designed by artist/musician Klaus VoormanBee Gees 1st will peak at number seven on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: July 7

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 7, 2014 09:16am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 7, 1940 - Legendary Beatles drummer Ringo Starr (born Richard Starkey in Liverpool, UK). Happy 74th Birthday, Ringo!
 


On this day in music history: July 7, 1962 - "The Stripper" by David Rose And His Orchestra hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week. Written by David Rose, it is the biggest hit for the British-born bandleader and composer. In 1958, Rose will write music for a television series called Burlesque (starring Dan Dailey and Joan Blondell). Recorded during the last ten minutes of a recording session, the song will go unreleased as the rest of the tracks recorded are more string oriented and the brassy instrumental seems out of place. Four years later, Rose will record a version of the pop standard "Ebb Tide" to promote the Paul Newman film Sweet Bird Of Youth. Without any time to record a B-side, "The Stripper" is pulled out of the vault and issued as the single's flipside. A DJ in Los Angeles named Robert Q. Lewis will discover the obscure track and will play it over and over for 45 minutes on his show. The stunt will make the record a hit locally in L.A., eventually spreading to the rest of the country. Entering the Hot 100 at #90 on May 12, 1962, it will climb to the top of the chart eight weeks later. Rose will go on to write the music for the long-running TV series Little House On The Prairie and Highway To Heaven. "The Stripper" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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