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Music History Monday: December 15

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 15, 2014 10:46am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: December 15, 1967The Who Sell Out, the third studio album by The Who, is released. Produced by Kit Lambert, it is recorded at Talentmasters Studios in New York City; IBC Studios, Pye Studios, De Lane Lea Studios, CBS Studios, and Kingsway Studios in London; and Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles from May - November of 1967. The band's third release is a concept album that includes songs interspersed with fake commercials and public service announcements, mimicking the British pirate radio station Radio London. The band will actually be sued by a number of companies whose real products are parodied on the album. It will spin off the classic "I Can See For Miles" (#10 UK, #9 US Pop). Original pressings of the album include a short instrumental cut in the runout groove. The first 1,000 copies of the original stereo and first 500 mono copies of the UK LP will come packaged with a psychedelic poster of a butterfly painted by artist Adrian George. The art had originally been intended for the album's cover, but is rejected. The rarity of these initial pressings have sold in recent years for more than $1,000 each or more on the collector's market. The album is reissued on CD in 1995 with ten additional bonus tracks including outtakes not included in the original release. It is reissued again in 2009 as a two CD Deluxe Edition featuring the original mono and stereo versions of the album, with 28 bonus tracks.The Who Sell Out will peak at number 13 on the UK album chart and number f48 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: December 8

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 8, 2014 10:57am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Remembering music icon John Lennon (born John Winston Lennon in Liverpool, UK) - October 9, 1940 - December 8, 1980.
 


Born on this day: December 8, 1925 - Entertainer extraordinaire Sammy Davis, Jr. (born Samuel George Davis, Jr. in Harlem, New York City, NY). Happy Birthday to this entertainment icon on what would have been his 89th Birthday. We love you, Sammy!
 


Born on this day: December 8, 1943 - The Doors lead vocalist, lyricist, and poet Jim Morrison (born James Douglas Morrison in Melbourne, FL). Happy Birthday to "The Lizard King" on what would have been his 71st Birthday.
 


On this day in music history: December 8, 1973 - “If You’re Ready (Come Go With Me)” by The Staple Singers hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for three weeks, also peaking at #9 on the Hot 100 on December 22, 1973. Written by Homer Banks, Raymond Jackson, and Carl Hampton, it is the second R&B chart-topper for the Chicago-based family group fronted by lead singer Mavis Staples. The song is inspired when Banks, Jackson, and Hampton are hanging out at Stax Studios in Memphis and they decide to go to lunch at a local restaurant. Before heading over, Raymond Jackson will blurt out the line “If you’re ready, come go with me.” Carl Hampton will hear him say it and then reply that it sounds like a potential song title. The trio will return to the studio and quickly write the song, recording a demo within a day of completing it. Issued as the first single from the group’s 17 album Be What You Are, the track features members of the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section including Jimmy Johnson (guitar), David Hood (bass), Roger Hawkins (drums), and Barry Beckett (keyboards). The group will record their vocals with the band live at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL in mid 1973. “If You’re Ready (Come Go With Me)” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: December 1

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 1, 2014 11:25am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: December 1, 1957 - Buddy Holly & The Crickets make their national television debut on the Ed Sullivan Show on the CBS television network. The band will perform their recent number one hit "That'll Be The Day." The band will also perform Holly's first solo release "Peggy Sue" on the show. Also appearing on the same program will be Sam Cooke (making his national TV debut) performing "You Send Me," which will hit number one the following day, and The Rays performing "Silhouettes."
 


On this day in music history: December 1, 1958 - "To Know Him Is To Love Him" by The Teddy Bears hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three  weeks. Written and produced by Phil Spector, it is the biggest hit for the Los Angeles-based pop vocal trio. Written by a then 17-year-old Phil Spector, the title is inspired by a quote on his father's epitaph. The group, consisting of Spector and high school friends Marshall Leib and Annette Kleinbard (aka songwriter Carol Connors), will record the song at Gold Star Studios in Hollywood in July of 1958 at a cost of only $75. Released on LA-based indie label Doré Records (distributed by Era Records), it will quickly become a smash locally before spreading across the country. Entering the Hot 100 at #88 on September 22, 1958, it will climb to the top of the chart ten weeks later. The group will not remain together for long. Uncomfortable as a performer, Spector will prefer to work behind the scenes, quickly establishing himself as a top notch songwriter and cementing his legendary work as a producer during the '60s and '70s. Kleinbard will be sidelined from the music industry when she is involved in a serious car accident, requiring several surgeries while she recovers. Changing her name to Carol Connors, she will also carve out a formitable career as a songwriter, co-writing such hits as the Oscar nominated "Gonna Fly Now" from Rocky, "With You I'm Born Again" (for Billy Preston and Syreeta), and the '60's hot rod classic "Hey Little Cobra" (for The Rip Chords). A rock & roll classic, "To Know Him" will be covered numerous times over the years including a version by Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris, and Dolly Parton that will hit number one on the Country chart in 1987. Singer Amy Winehouse will also cover the song, with her version appearing on the posthumously released compilation Amy Winehouse At The BBC in 2012. "To Know Him Is To Love Him" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: November 24

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 24, 2014 10:40am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: November 24, 1966 - The Beatles will begin recording "Strawberry Fields Forever" at Abbey Road Studios in London. After a three month vacation, the band will return to the studio to begin work on the follow up to "Revolver." The first song recorded is a new composition of John Lennon's titled "Strawberry Fields Forever." Lennon will write the song in Almeria, Spain while filming How I Won The War with director Richard Lester in the early Fall of 1966. One take of the song will be recorded that evening, though it'll change dramatically and grow more complex over the month that it takes to complete the track. The song will mark the beginning of a new era in the band's creativity that will change the face of popular music yet again. The song is named for a Salvation Army orphanage around the corner from Lennon's childhood home in Liverpool where he would attend garden parties in the summer. Once in the studio, the song will evolve from a gentle, sparsely arranged ballad to a heavily scored piece with horns and strings complimenting the basic track. The finished version of the song will consist of two separate versions. Lennon will like the first half of the first remake and the second half of another. He will suggest to producer George Martin that the two be edited together, which at first seems to not be possible since they are recorded in different keys and tempos. Martin will discover that by increasing the speed of one and slowing down the other recording, that they will match. Originally intended to be part of the band's next album (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band), "Strawberry Fields Forever" will instead be issued as one half of a double A-sided single in February 1967 (w/ "Penny Lane"). It will peak at #2 on the UK singles chart and #8 on the Billboard Hot 100.
 

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Music History Monday: November 17

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 17, 2014 10:14am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: November 17, 1962 - "Big Girls Don't Cry" by The Four Seasons hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for five weeks, also topping the R&B singles chart for three weeks on the same date. Written by Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio, it is the second consecutive chart-topping single for the New Jersey-based quartet fronted by singer Frankie Valli. The song's title is inspired by a line in the 1955 western Tennessee's Partner in which the actor John Payne slaps actress Rhonda Fleming in the face, and she replies, "Big girls don't cry." Like its predecessor "Sherry," it will storm the charts quickly. Entering the Hot 100 at #66 on October 20, 1962, it will zoom to the top of the chart just four weeks later. Twenty five years after its original release, the song will also be heard in the film and featured on the soundtrack to Dirty Dancing. "Big Girls Don't Cry" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 


On this day in music history: November 17, 1971 - Live-Evil, the 38th album by Miles Davis, is released. Produced by Teo Macero, it is recorded at The Cellar Door in Washington DC on December 19, 1970, and at Columbia Studio B from February - June 1970. The half live/half in-studio recorded double LP set consists of eight extended electric based jams featuring Davis supported by musicians such as Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, John McLaughlin, Michael Henderson, Jack DeJohnette, Billy Cobham, Wayne Shorter, Dave Holland, Airto Moreira, and Keith Jarrett. Originally conceived as a continuation of the landmark Bitches Brew, it will differ greatly from its predecessor by incorporating more rock and funk elements. It will be well received upon its release and is considered a pioneering jazz/funk recording, as well as one of the cornerstones of Davis's "Electric Period." The album's distinctive cover art was created by artist Mati Klarwein, best known for cover art on Bitches Brew and Santana's Abraxas. Davis will tell Klarwein that he wants something representing "life" on the front cover, and something representing "evil" on the back. The front will feature a painting of a pregnant African woman, while the back features a grotesque looking amphibian like creature in a powered wig clutching its belly. The latter painting is inspired by a picture that the artist sees of infamous FBI director J. Edgar Hoover on the cover of Time Magazine. "Live-Evil" will peak at number 125 on the Billboard Top 200 and number four on the Jazz chart.
 

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