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20 Essential Records You Need on Vinyl

Posted by Billy Gil, April 10, 2013 09:21am | Post a Comment

Use the promo code vinyl10 to get 10% off any new and used vinyl on Amoeba.com.


In honor of the upcoming Record Store Day 2013, I decided to make a list of 20 records I think everyone should own on vinyl. Take this Record Store Day to build a nice foundation for your record collection. I picked this list based on pretty arbitrary criteria, including what critics generally think are great, what I think is great, what I think particularly sounds good on analog-warm vinyl, and what you won’t have to pay $100 for or scour for (e.g. no hard-to-find ’90s vinyl or things out of print). I also left it to one album per artist. These aren't in any particular order. Send any omissions to this list to idontcare@makeyourownlist.com. Or just leave a comment!

 

The BeatlesRevolver

The Beatles RevolverIn my mind, The White Album is the greatest Beatles album, but you can’t beat the utterly perfect one-disc punch of Revolver. It should go without saying that every Beatles album is essential and is worth owning on vinyl yadda yadda, but if you have to start somewhere, do it here. Their catalog was recently reissued on vinyl in stereo mix, so you should have no trouble finding them if you’re just starting out — and you should have no trouble finding quality replacements, if your old Beatles LPs are worn out.

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New York State of Mind Amoeblog #18: Jamie McCormick @ Abraco Espresso, Former Mayor Ed Koch, Transit Exhibit & other Events/Shows

Posted by Billyjam, January 23, 2013 09:30am | Post a Comment
     

For this week's installment of the New York State of Mind Amoeblog I interview East Bay to NY transplant and old friend of Amoeba Music Jamie McCormick of renowned East Village coffee mecca Abraço Espresso (including some of Jamie's top five music lists and picks), discuss the new documentary Koch on former NYC mayor Ed Koch, take a look at a transit themed exhibit inside Grand Central Terminal which turns 100 years old in two weeks, and a quick rundown of some of the shows and events in the week ahead in the city of New York. These include the free, all ages NYC Parks Winter Jam this Saturday, Jan 26th from 11am to 3pm in the Bandshell area of Central Park. More info here.

Although her track record for concerts has  been sketchy to put it nicely Cat Power has left all that erratic behavior behind her nowadays reportedly. And the artist born Chan Marshall plays Terminal 5 at 610 W 56th St. next Tuesday (1/29), in support of her current highly recommended album Sun. Angel Haze is the opening act. 8pm show. All ages. Tickets $25. More info.

Meanwhile on 125th Street in the heart of Harlem the Studio Museum, always offers some wonderfully engaging exhibits with an emphasis on art and artists of African descent,  currently on exhibit is the excellent photo show: Gordon Parks: A Harlem Family 1967 that follows one family around on their daily grind and features such shots as the one below. Note that Sundays is free day at the Studio Museum.

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Music History Monday: July 30

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 30, 2012 01:17pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 30, 1958 - Singer/Songwriter Kate Bush (born Catherine Bush in Bexleyheath, Kent, UK). Happy 54rd Birthday, Kate!!


On this day in music history: July 30, 1966 - "Wild Thing" by The Troggs hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks. Written by Chip Taylor (real name James Wesley Voight, brother of Oscar winning actor Jon Voight), it is the biggest hit for the UK rock band. The Troggs will record the song at Olympic Studios in London in early 1966 in just two takes. The record will break in the bands' native UK first following an appearance on the television program Thank Your Lucky Stars. When "Wild Thing" is released as a single in the US, it will be the subject of a dispute over its distribution rights. It will be released simultaneously on both Atco and Fontana Records, making it the only #1 single in Billboard chart history to appear on the chart on two different labels at the same time.


On this day in music history: July 30, 1968 - The Beatles begin recording "Hey Jude" at Abbey Road Studios in London, in Studio 2. Written by Paul McCartney, he is inspired to write the song (originally titled "Hey Jules") while driving over to visit bandmate John Lennon's five-year-old son Julian and former wife Cynthia. Paul begins writing the song to console Julian after his parents have separated and are in the process of getting divorced. McCartney will later state another inspiration for the song will be his recent break up with long term girlfriend actress Jane Asher. John Lennon will also feel that Paul is speaking (indirectly) to him in the song as he has begun his relationship with Yoko Ono at this time. The master take of the song will be recorded at Trident Studios in Soho the next day. It will become the bands' biggest single, spending nine weeks at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and selling over four million copies.

Teddy Charles RIP

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, April 18, 2012 11:00pm | Post a Comment


The Influence Of African-American Culture On A Non African-American: Four Examples

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, February 19, 2012 11:31pm | Post a Comment
Malcolm XI grew up on black culture. For most Mexican-Americans like myself growing up in the seventies and eighties, we didn’t feel a part of dominant society nor of our Mexican heritage. Schools were devoid of Latin American studies and English as a second language courses were frowned upon. As a kid I was lost; I didn’t know anything about my own culture but felt distant from American or European culture. For many of us, African-American culture was our alternative. I believed our struggles were the same. We were occupied people. We were once a part of progressive society and then we were conquered and made slaves. Although we received some basic human rights over the years we were always looked as second-class citizens here in the U.S. We were looked as something to fear and exclude. As years went on, some blacks and Latinos started to feel that they were part of mainstream society. Perhaps wanting to forget the past, some blacks and Latinos forgot the oppression they once shared. We separated, made our own history and often competed against each other to get out of the racial cellar.  

Even after becoming aware of my own cultural heritage, I never forgot the influence that African-American culture had on me. I find it strange to meet Mexican-Americans that have many European influences but no black cultural influences. I find it even stranger that many of them have the same fears of blacks as other members of dominant society. 

I cannot shake the influence of the many African-American musicians, activists, athletes and artists had on me, even after discovering the many great Chicano/Latin American icons that influence me today. For that reason, I would like to pay tribute to some African American icons that have influenced my life in some way or another.

Malcolm X

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