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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Unknown Mortal Orchestra

Posted by Amoebite, November 19, 2014 01:16pm | Post a Comment

Unknown Mortal Orchestra What's in My Bag

Unknown Mortal Orchestra is the brainchild of New Zealander Ruban Nielson (formerly of the Mint Chicks). After relocating to Portland, Oregon, Nielson met future bandmates Jacob Portrait (bass) and Riley Geare (drums). In 2010, Nielson released a self-produced home recording of the track "Ffunny Ffriends" on the music site Bandcamp. With virtually no info on the band or music, bloggers and digital music diggers started sharing the song and word of the band started to spread. In the summer of 2011, the band released a self-titled album on Fat Possum Records. Check out what Lou Barlow (Dinosaur Jr, Sebadoh) had to say about UMO's debut album in his "What's In My Bag?" episode here. In 2013, Unknown Mortal Orchestra signed with the Jagjaguwar label and released the album II . 

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Music History Monday: November 17

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 17, 2014 10:14am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: November 17, 1962 - "Big Girls Don't Cry" by The Four Seasons hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for five weeks, also topping the R&B singles chart for three weeks on the same date. Written by Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio, it is the second consecutive chart-topping single for the New Jersey-based quartet fronted by singer Frankie Valli. The song's title is inspired by a line in the 1955 western Tennessee's Partner in which the actor John Payne slaps actress Rhonda Fleming in the face, and she replies, "Big girls don't cry." Like its predecessor "Sherry," it will storm the charts quickly. Entering the Hot 100 at #66 on October 20, 1962, it will zoom to the top of the chart just four weeks later. Twenty five years after its original release, the song will also be heard in the film and featured on the soundtrack to Dirty Dancing. "Big Girls Don't Cry" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 


On this day in music history: November 17, 1971 - Live-Evil, the 38th album by Miles Davis, is released. Produced by Teo Macero, it is recorded at The Cellar Door in Washington DC on December 19, 1970, and at Columbia Studio B from February - June 1970. The half live/half in-studio recorded double LP set consists of eight extended electric based jams featuring Davis supported by musicians such as Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, John McLaughlin, Michael Henderson, Jack DeJohnette, Billy Cobham, Wayne Shorter, Dave Holland, Airto Moreira, and Keith Jarrett. Originally conceived as a continuation of the landmark Bitches Brew, it will differ greatly from its predecessor by incorporating more rock and funk elements. It will be well received upon its release and is considered a pioneering jazz/funk recording, as well as one of the cornerstones of Davis's "Electric Period." The album's distinctive cover art was created by artist Mati Klarwein, best known for cover art on Bitches Brew and Santana's Abraxas. Davis will tell Klarwein that he wants something representing "life" on the front cover, and something representing "evil" on the back. The front will feature a painting of a pregnant African woman, while the back features a grotesque looking amphibian like creature in a powered wig clutching its belly. The latter painting is inspired by a picture that the artist sees of infamous FBI director J. Edgar Hoover on the cover of Time Magazine. "Live-Evil" will peak at number 125 on the Billboard Top 200 and number four on the Jazz chart.
 

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Music History Monday: May 26

Posted by Jeff Harris, May 26, 2014 08:16am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: May 26, 1926 - Trumpeter and jazz music icon Miles Davis (Born Miles Dewey Davis III in Alton, IL). Happy Birthday to one of the most innovative musicians of the 20th century on what would have been his 88th birthday. We love you, Miles!
 


On this day in music history: May 26, 1973 - "Frankenstein" by The Edgar Winter Group hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week. Written by Edgar Winter, it is the biggest hit for the blues/rock band fronted by Texas born Winter. The song originates as an extended in studio jam. The rock instrumental derives its title from an in joke between band members, due to the number of splices made in the final master version of the song, and also to describe the song's heavy, lumbering beat. It is the last track recorded for Winter's They Only Come Out At Night album, and is initially released as the B-side to "Hangin' Around." After DJ's begin playing the flipside and due to enthusiastic public response, Epic Records will re-issue the single with the sides reversed. Entering the Hot 100 at #98 on March 10, 1973, it will climb to the top of the chart eleven weeks later. "Frankenstein" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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A Fantastic New Pressing of a Miles Davis Masterstroke

Posted by Rick Frystak, January 15, 2014 01:51pm | Post a Comment

Miles Dewey Davis may have been many things, but he was certainly a forward-thinking artist with an eye out for what was happening at any given time in the musical landscape, and an urge to not repeat himself in his journey toward a newer, “hipper “style, like it or not. Some, myself included, would argue this point vigorously towards various stages of his career output, especially later. This week, the formidable Impex Record company releases one of Miles’ most contemporary and timeless albums of music and cultural relevance: 1965’s “ESP”.  

 

Miles Davis Quintet

E.S.P.

Impex Records IMP 6018

180 gram LP (2014) 

 

So… Miles Davis in 1965? ‘Trane releases “A Love Supreme”, “Rubber Soul” comes out, Horowitz plays Carnagie Hall, Otis Redding , The Byrds and Bob Dylan release classic, timeless music, and new Miles Davis Quintet members Wayne  Shorter and Herbie Hancock had just presented “Speak No Evil” and “Maiden Voyage” to the universe. Miles' previous band had already left, but he had the next great quintet already assembled, Wayne being the final glorious recruit. "E.S.P." would be their first studio recording together, and what a record it turns out to be, produced by Columbia Records' A&R man Irving Townsend, he of “Kind Of Blue”, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, etc. fame. The cover features a bewildered Miles and an adorable Frances Davis, with Miles sporting quite the flummoxed facial expression. "Man, does she have 'E.S.P.'?" 

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20 Essential Records You Need on Vinyl

Posted by Billy Gil, April 10, 2013 09:21am | Post a Comment

Use the promo code vinyl10 to get 10% off any new and used vinyl on Amoeba.com.


In honor of the upcoming Record Store Day 2013, I decided to make a list of 20 records I think everyone should own on vinyl. Take this Record Store Day to build a nice foundation for your record collection. I picked this list based on pretty arbitrary criteria, including what critics generally think are great, what I think is great, what I think particularly sounds good on analog-warm vinyl, and what you won’t have to pay $100 for or scour for (e.g. no hard-to-find ’90s vinyl or things out of print). I also left it to one album per artist. These aren't in any particular order. Send any omissions to this list to idontcare@makeyourownlist.com. Or just leave a comment!

 

The BeatlesRevolver

The Beatles RevolverIn my mind, The White Album is the greatest Beatles album, but you can’t beat the utterly perfect one-disc punch of Revolver. It should go without saying that every Beatles album is essential and is worth owning on vinyl yadda yadda, but if you have to start somewhere, do it here. Their catalog was recently reissued on vinyl in stereo mix, so you should have no trouble finding them if you’re just starting out — and you should have no trouble finding quality replacements, if your old Beatles LPs are worn out.

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