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New 12"s @ Amoeba Hollywood 2/8 - Michael Whitehead, Pharoahs, 214, Versalife, Jeremy Greenspan, Daddub, Eddie C, and more

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, February 14, 2013 12:24pm | Post a Comment

Michael Whitehead

Danse Club 

Why release Jersey-inspired house when you can reissue the real thing? The “Meat Mixx” and “NYC Dub” of this Whitehead/Murk collaboration are compiled here, along with present-day remixes. The original NYC Dub is a transcendent example of American garage house - all vocal cutups, pristine piano, swung drums and organ steps.The Meat Mixx makes full-use of Whitehead’s powerhouse ( vocals. A1, the remix by Willie Graff and Tucillo provides an airier interpretation of the NYC Dub’s organ stabs and Whitehead’s soaring vocals, and adds a subtle acidic squelch. The Florian Kruse mix has a classic Strictly Rhythm vibe while Max Jacobson takes a deeper approach - looping a wordless sample of Whitehead’s vocal, but buoying the track with live-sounding bongos. Great release!

Purchase Under My Spell



Pharoahs
Island Time
ESP Institute

Their status as LA’s premier live dance/balaeric/kraut/? band cemented, the group of talented producers and music nerds (Pharoahs’ core consists of former Amoeba employee Sam Cooper, Dublab dude Ale Cooper and rising producer Suzanne Kraft) make the move to fellow diviner Lovefingers’ label for their most realized effort yet. “Ahumba” is named after surfer Cooper’s dream beach in Zanzibar - and the song reworks windswept digital beauty of the Innovative Communications label for the dancefloor. Sublime guitar arpeggiations color the tropical tracks. “If It Ever Feels Right” is a live staple that never comes out quite the same - a testament to the massive amount of improv that makes Pharaohs such an exciting group. The basis of the track is a descending Juno 60 arpeggio - delayed uptown sax, a far-off pad and varied percussion fill this out into perhaps the most floor-friendly track on the record. The insistent bassline eventually ends up scoring some light jacking and zonked sax-work worthy of Roland P. Young. Island Time successfully focuses on rhythm rather than the synth acrobats of the other tracks, bringing the tide back out for this great EP.

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Feel That BASS - Miami Bass Celebrated Tonight @ SOM Bar in San Francisco

Posted by Billyjam, April 5, 2012 04:20pm | Post a Comment
Tonight (Thursday April 5th) at SOM Bar in San Francisco, along with DJ Quest, Marc Stretch, & DJ Stef, I am going to be spinning an all Miami Bass booty-shaking DJ set as part of a one-off all Miami Bass night that should be a lot of fun. Free before 10pm. $5 thereafter at the Mission District club. All four of us DJs have a passion for this music that originated (as its name implies) in Miami, Florida in the latter half of the 80's and continued to proser into the 90's. An 808 drum machine driven music, with layers upon layers of booming bass (some records even carried "speaker warning" stickers), it was geared for both booty shaking (dancefloor) and bass booming speakers (the club and the trunk of the car - such as L'Trimm's "Cars That Goes Boom" off their 1988 album Grab It. )

Miami Bass or "booty bass" took hold in Miami Florida and was a direct continuation of NYC's early 80's electro funk hip-hop in much the same way as the 1980's LA electro hip-hop similarly took its cue from Afrika Bambaataa and the other New York City electro pioneers from earlier in that decade. But, as distinct from West Coast and the original NYC electro,  Miami Booty Bass music had its own unique identity. Rather than being political or Afro-Centric with tales of ancestry of Egypt, Egypt or even early gangsta rap - the music from Miami was more simple, chant along, and in many cases much more sexually explicit - as proven by the most popular of the Miami bass groups who became prominent nationally in the latter 80's - The 2 Live Crew. With explicit lyrics laced songs like "We Want Some Pussy," the 2 Live Crew had a major influence on this music - both lyrically and in choice of samples.  Most Miami Bass, a singles driven genre, was released on small indie labels with majors selectively picking up the songs that had proven to be regional hits and hence likely to become commercial national hits.

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