Amoeblog

New York State of Mind Amoeblog #56: 1970's New York City On Film

Posted by Billyjam, November 13, 2013 01:00pm | Post a Comment

Over the past week since the election win of distinctly left leaning liberal Democrat Bill de Blasio as New York City's next mayor with a landslide win of 73% of the vote, following 20 years / five consecutive terms of conservative Republican mayors Michael Bloomberg and Rudy Giuliani who brought sweeping changes to the Big Apple including sharp drop in crime statistics, there has been much talk of what actually lies ahead for the city of New York under the new liberal mayor elect whose "progress" themed campaign platform was run on the promise of bringing sweeping changes (particularly in areas of inequality, most notably the racial profiling of NYPD's 'stop and frisk' policies) to the citizens of New York City. 

One thing that both supporters and detractors of de Blasio seem to share is their uncertainty as to what exactly lies ahead for New York City once the new mayor of "change" takes office on January 1st. All agree that there will be sweeping changes to the running of NYC on a day to day basis particularly in that of the NYPD - but as to what those changes will ultimately mean for New York City is up for debate. Both sides seem to agree that de Blasio will return NYC to an earlier time, but just how much earlier is up for debate. Some have suggested that New York might return to how it was in the 1970's - a time of economic upheaval when Gotham was a dingy, disheveled, crime-ridden metropolis - albeit one romanticized by many in retrospect.

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LEMME GUESS: "I'M A CLIENT"

Posted by Charles Reece, August 16, 2009 09:34am | Post a Comment
The trailer for Martin Scorsese's new film reminds me of the "twist" contained in the one for Sixth Sense:


I hope he's just leading those of us who see too many movies down the garden path, but Goodfellas was a long time ago. Still, I can watch Mark Ruffalo in just about anything; he's the cat's pajamas!

mark ruffalo

No Direction Home: Dylan Was Always Bound for Glory

Posted by Miss Ess, February 11, 2009 07:05pm | Post a Comment
I rewatched Scorsese's No Direction Home, the documentary about Bob Dylan, last night for the first time since it aired on TV a few years back. The DVD is 3 and half hours long! But fabulous, through and through.

no direction home

The most interesting points in the movie for me were the moments where Dylan's self creation was discussed. He's long been known as something of a shape shifter and it was interesting to think about the concept of home through his eyes -- where it is and how one gets there. I still wouldn't call Dylan a straight bob dylan and joan baezshooter or anything after watching the documentary, but my interest was piqued by both his comments and those of his many friends and collegues who were interviewed for the project, among them: Dave Van Ronk, Joan Baez, Mark Spoelstra, Al Kooper, Liam Clancy, Allen Ginsberg, Pete Seeger, Mavis Staples and Suze Rotolo.

Dylan says he was "born a long way from where [he was] supposed to be" and that he's been looking for his home, forging his own version of it ever since -- and he definitely doesn't look back. He's been inventing his own truth, his own identity throughout his career, allowing no one to pin him down at any one moment. Even his last name is an invention, purely his way of creating an identity for himself.  Dylan believes he had no past, and totally seperated himself from his Hibbing, MN upbringing. He only looked to the present moment, and did what pleased him then. This goes a long way toward explaining his career and its diversity as well as the period in the mid-60s where he took a lot of heat for "going electric." The film covers this period with dynamic energy, interviewing those who were on the side of Dylan's "authentic" folk music/protest songs and those whose eyes were fixed on the future of rock in 1965. It's thrilling to watch the portion of the film where the audacio1965 newport folk festivalus 1965 Newport Folk Festival performance is discussed, but then again, I always seem to find this a thrilling moment in musical history.

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Tonight! RARE Scorsese Short Films at the New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, November 1, 2007 11:49am | Post a Comment
Nov. 1: Five by Scorsese:

Kino International is proud to release a program of five rarely-seen films by America's greatest living director, Martin Scorcese. In ITALIANAMERICAN (1974, 48 minutes, color) Scorcese invites the viewer into the home of his late parents, Catherin and Charles (who have appeared in Goodfellas, Mean Streets and Raging Bull). There they discuss everything from their immigrant heritage, on-camera behavior and the family's secret spaghetti sauce recipe. To the tune of Bunny Berigan's "I Can't Get Started," a morning shave turns into a musical bloodletting in THE BIG SHAVE (1968, 6 muntes, color), an early black comedy gem unavailable for years. In AMERICAN BOY (1978, 55 minutes, Color), Scorsese "interviews" Steven Prince, best remembered as the peripatetic gun salesman Easy Andy in Taxi Driver Prince's accounts of his tragicomic upbringing as an army brat, his travels as a rock band's road manager and subsequent heroin addiction are punctuated by Neil Young's "Time Fades Away"

WHAT'S A NICE GIRL LIKE YOU DOING IN A PLACE LIKE THIS? (1963, 9 minutes B/W) A young writer grows increasingly obsessed with a framed photograph hanging on his wall. IT'S NOT JUST YOU, MURRAY! (1964, 15 minutes, B/W) A small-time hoodlum named Murray thrives on his friendship with Joe, oblivious to the fact that he is being exploited by his longtime pal.

Please note: all 5 films will be screened in 16mm.

7165 West Beverly Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036
7:30 start time
$7 general admission
$6 student
$4 senior

http://www.newbevcinema.com/