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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: With Help from World's Famous Supreme Team & Others, Malcolm McLaren Created A Hip-Hop Classic

Posted by Billyjam, March 18, 2014 08:00am | Post a Comment

    


A true sign of any album qualifying as a classic in its respective genre is when, even 31 years after its initial malcolm mclarenrelease, it still packs the same punch it did upon first listen. Such is most definitely the case with Malcolm McLaren's hip-hop and world music 43:36 minute classic album Duck Rock that was originally released in January 1983 on Island Records in the US and on Charisma in the UK. Presenting divergent styles of music from round the globe, most notably hip-hop and African and all interspersed with NYC hip-hop radio show snippets from the World's Famous Supreme Team radio show,  Duck Rock featured such timeless hits as "Buffalo Gals" and "Double Dutch." And while British impresario Malcolm McLaren, who was perhaps best known then and now as the former manager of the Sex Pistols, is credited as the album's creator or main artist, that was not technically the case. The maverick McLaren was really more of a hands-on executive producer with a knack for unearthing new trends long before they broke and repackaging them for public consumption. And for this intuitive gift McLaren, who died four years ago, has been praised for discovering new artists/genres while alternately been criticized for exploitation. McLaren has also (rightfully) been accused of routinely giving himself more much credit than he may have deserved. In the case of Duck Rock he is listed as the artist on the record while there are numerous artists on there - with McLaren, who sings and kind of raps throughout Duck Rock (like when he does the talkover in "Double Dutch"), being just one contributing artist. McLaren is also credited as "producer" along with (post Buggles / pre The Art of Noise) Trevor Horn who actually did the majority of the music production; perfectly melding together divergent styles and sounds that included South American, Caribbean, and down home Americana roots. Thomas Dolby was also a musical contributor.

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Return Of The Wu, Saluting Malcolm McLaren, New Aloe Blacc: Amoeba Music Weekly Hip-Hop Round Up: 04:09:10

Posted by Billyjam, April 9, 2010 10:40am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Hollywood Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 04:09:10

Wu Massacre
1) Meth, Ghost, Rae Wu Massacre (Def Jam)

2) E40 Revenue Retrievin'- Night Shift (Heavy on the Grind Ent.)

3) Madlib Medicine Show 3-Beat Konducta in Africa (Stones Throw)

4) E40 Revenue Retrievin'- Day Shift (Heavy on the Grind Ent.)

5) Jedi Mind Tricks presents Army Of The Pharaohs: The Unholy Terror (DCide Records)

For those disappointed by the recent Return of the Wu album on Gold Dust Media that sounded, by its title, like it would have been an all new Wu-Tang Clan album but in actuality was really a collection of recycled (mostly previously available) Wu related material mixed by Mathematics, two recommended new releases on this week's Amoeba Music Hollywood Hip-Hop Top Five Chart should nicely ease that disappointment. While neither are officially Wu Tang Clan releases, one features three original members of the legendary Shaolin crew on an album that is like a throwback to their brilliant mid 90's sound, while the other new release is perhaps the closest thing to a current day collective carrying on the legacy of the great Wu-Tang that you will hear these days.

Method Man, Ghostface Killah and Raekwon (aka Meth, Ghost, Rae) have joined creative forces to unleash Wu Massacre which, with the album's many producers including the Wu's RZA and Mathematics plus cameos from such other Wu alums as Cappadona and Inspectah Deck, is essentially a new Wu-Tang album -- and a really good one too, serving up such bangers as "Pimpin' Chipp" and the soulful 70's infused single "Our Dreams" (below) which is the only RZA produced song on the twelve track album. Mathematics handles the majority of the album's production with further contributions from Scram Jones, Emile, BT, Ty Fyffe and Digem Tracks Productions. While there is certainly no filler on Wu Massacre, it is over too fast, with the total running time of a little under half an hour, which leaves you thirsting for more Wu or at least Wu styled music.

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Anarchy in the UK - Vivienne Westwood at the De Young

Posted by Miss Ess, June 3, 2007 08:48pm | Post a Comment
Spurred by the looming end of the exhibit, I grabbed my friends Brad and Josh and a few Bob's sex vivienne westwood london malcolm mclaren doughnuts (lemon jelly filled!) and ran to the Vivienne Westwood Exhibit at the De Young Museum.

Based on what I saw, one thing I learned was that Vivienne's clothing is still cutting edge: overwhelmingly so. The exhibit is a complete retrospective of her career, from her punk beginnings in the early 70s to now.  [An aside:  Anyone else wonder what her son with Malcolm McLaren is up to these days?  When you have parents like that, seems like the sky's the limit.]  It's also funny that the clothes Vivienne and Malcolm created together that were so shocking and offensive back in the 70s are now ripped off and mass marketed to every kid who wants some prepackaged rock'nroll edge at Hot Topics across America.  Weird.  Don't people realize what they are purchasing? The fact that every suburban kid these days hits the mall for their "edgy" faux punk gear makes it more difficult to remember that the clothes really were like nothing else when they were originally created, and that a lot of actual, intelligent thought went into the creations.

vivenne westwood sex
Here's Miss Vivienne.  They actually had this shirt at the exhibition.

Like my partners in crime for the day, I wished that the exhibit had more photographs of actual people (yes, even models count!) wearing the fashions instead of just faceless mannequins so we could picture them better, but nonetheless the clothing was for the most part gorgeous and incredibly detailed.  Vivienne moved on from punk rock clothing gracefully to play with the old and the new, the high and the low, with many styles including world fusion-y and pirate-y styles in the 80s:

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