Amoeblog

New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Phantogram

Posted by Amoebite, October 28, 2014 03:28pm | Post a Comment

Phantogram

The self-proclaimed "street beat, psych pop" duo known as Phantogram have been making some serious noise over the last few years. Now backed by major label Universal Records, Phantogram released Voices earlier this year, which many critics and fans said was their most cohessive and appealing album yet. Voices tastefully delivers well crafted catchy pop hooks with the gloss to rival any Rihanna or Beyonce smash hit.

PhantogramFormed in 2007 by childhood friends Josh Carter (vocals/guitars) and Sarah Barthel (vocals/keyboards), the band (originally called Charlie Everywhere) first signed with BBE in Europe and then signed with Barsuk Records in the U.S. To date, Phantogram has released two studio albums - Eyelid Movies (2009) and Voices (2014) - four EPs, and various singles. They have maintained a steady tour schedule, sharing stages with the likes of Zero 7, The xx, Ra Ra Riot, School of Seven Bells, Brazilian Girls, and opened for M83 at the iconic Hollywood Bowl. Phantogram has also been featured on several major North American festivals including Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, Coachella, Sasquatch, Bumbershoot, Treasure Island, Outside Lands, Firefly, and Summerfest. Needless to say, they've been very busy.

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Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: My Bloody Valentine

Posted by Amoebite, April 7, 2009 11:04pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth
Coachella Lineup     My Bloody Valentine

Day #22 - Artist #22 - My Bloody Valentine:
My Bloody Valentine
My Bloody Valentine formed in 1984 in Dublin, Ireland, and spent a few years of metamorphosis working out the kinks with lineup changes and varying musical output before developing their innovative sound. It wasn't until 1988 that the "caterpillar" became a "butterfly," with the band releasing a pair of EPs and their first album Isn't Anything on Creation Records (future home to Oasis). My Bloody Valentine became the torchbearers of the Shoegaze style of music popular in the late '80s/early '90s that sent sparks into the alternative revolution of the 1990s. Unfortunately, by 1993 the band would unravel into a "lost period" of scrapped recording sessions by songwriter Kevin Shields (similar to Brian Wilson/Beach Boys and Axl Rose/Guns N' Roses) that lasted until the band's reunion in 2008. 

Belong's October Language: 2006 treasure of static and buzz

Posted by J. Mark Beaver, March 13, 2009 02:07pm | Post a Comment
belong october language
I get a strange thrill out of stumbling upon albums that sound exactly like what their cover suggests -- in this case, the ancient decaying photo of a pioneer-era buiding, probably from Belong's hometown of New Orleans; the spaces where the color saturates and the many spots where all color and image have been wiped away by time and the elements. October Language is the aural equivalent.

Compared to electronic frontiersmen like Fennesz and William Basinski, Belong (composed, for this recording, of conspirators Turk Dietrich and Michael Jones) make sounds that seem to be in the process of disappearing even as they first appear. The opening track, "I Never Lose. Never Really." begins with a tone like hearing an orchestra muted through the walls of a building, as if the swelling adagio would come through crystal clear if someone would just open the right door. Then it all begins to descend beneath an increasing tide of swirling static.

I find the whole album to be, essentially, meditational. There is a profound silence at the center of it, not unlike modern classical compositions by the likes of Arvo Part, Toru Takemitsu or Henryk Gorecki. The focus on electronics and instruments more often associated with Rock makes October Language more immediately reminiscent of My Bloody Valentine's Loveless than anything within the Classical tradition.

There are very few vocal tones on the album, another factor that pulls it away from the Rock genre, and the pure focus on the build and wane of the sound and atmosphere places it among my favorite listens of the last few years.

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