Amoeblog

Continued Anticipation Surrounding Lil Wayne's Rebirth Album

Posted by Billyjam, May 28, 2009 08:00am | Post a Comment
Lil Wayne Rebirth
With its release date having been postoned more than once already (April 7th, May 19th, and June 23 were each cancelled street dates), Lil Wayne's anticipated seventh studio album Rebirth (Cash Money Universal Motwon) is now slated to be released eight weeks from now, on July 21st. However, the promise by the rapper that it would be an all rock album is up for debate. Still, regardless of whatever music is on the new Southern rap artist's album, Rebirth is a guaranteed future hit.

Originally billed as a "rock album" by the artist, born Dwayne Michael Carter, Jr, who has cited Kurt Cobain in interviews as being among his major influences, Rebirth has caused controversy among rap fans who fear that their hero had deserted the genre he came to fame in. In fact, the first single off Rebirth, the rocking, guitar laced "Prom Queen" (video below), didn't chart nearly as well as some past Wayne hits. Some have speculated that this was part of the reason for the album's delay and its genre reformatting to more of a rap than a rock album.

"The influence of the new album is mainly rock...a little different than they [the fans] have been used to," offered Lil Wayne in his recent Soundcheck interview. "We just used the title rock cos we didn't want people to think I am too different so therefore we put the title on the music before they do. But really it's just more Lil Wayne maturing," he said in an interview on The View four weeks ago. Meanwhile Bryan "Baby" Williams (aka Birdman -- one half of BIg Tymers), Cash Money Records co-CEO and mentor to Lil Wayne, informed Vibe magazine that, “It’s not a rock record...That’s what I think people are getting misunderstood. When you speaking about a rock record, you think he’s got a guitar and everything, but it’s not that."

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GETTING DUMB WIT IT: SAT SCORES RELATED TO MUSIC LISTENED TO

Posted by Billyjam, February 28, 2009 11:09am | Post a Comment
The above image, courtesy of TMZ.com, pretty much sums up the overall results of the intriguing recent scientific study by young computer wiz Virgil Griffith which came to the conclusion that smart people listen to Ludwig Van Beethoven while dumb peeps bumped Lil Weezy, and average intelligence folks knew all the lyrics to "Mr Jones" by The Counting Crows.

This SAT scores related to music habits study, which it goes without saying should be taken with a grain of salt, was conducted by comparing SAT scores with music listened to by a sample of college students. The study utilized Facebook profiles' listing of favorite music/artists and correlated this with said students' SAT scores.

Lil Slim

Posted by Eric Brightwell, December 1, 2008 03:15pm | Post a Comment
Lil Slim

Lil Slim was one of the first artists to be signed to Cash Money Records. After a series of underground classics, he parted ways with the label. A couple of years later, CMR signed a multi-million dollar deal with Universal and the label's star, Juvenile, carried the new roster to success whilst Lil Slim receded into the shadows.

Hollygrove

Lil Slim lived way out in the 17th Ward on New Orleans's western edge in Hollygrove, a small, lower middle class neighborhood that also was home to Big Boy (and later, No Limit) artist, Fiend. Representing the Apple and Eagle intersection, he brought his raps to audiences at Club 49, where he performed alongside UNLV and Soulja Slim. One day, Ziggler the Wiggler introduced them to Mannie Fresh, a young DJ from the 7th Ward who'd gained a measurable degree of local fame with rapper Gregory D. Shortly after, Lil Slim was introduced to Baby and Slim, brothers and co-owners of the fledgling Cash Money Records label. They signed Lil Slim and recorded his first album in Baby's kitchen.
The Game Is Cold
The album was The Game is Cold (1993). One highlight is "Hoes I U's 2 Sweat." Another is "Bounce Slide Ride," a Bounce classic in the vein of DJ Jimi and Juvenile's "Bounce for the Juvenile" which name-checked Juvie and echoed his taste for Reeboks and Girbaud. Lil Slim's style was sing-songy, reggae-informed, repetitive and heavy on chants -- somewhat similar to Pimp Daddy, UNLV and early Juvenile. One thing that set him apart was his exaggerated Yat accent, in which the familiar interjection "Ya heard me?" sounded like "Ya hoidz me?" Cash Money was then primarily a Bounce label and a good deal of the lyrics amounted to little more than calling out wards and projects. Expecting lyrical complexity outPowder Shop of Bounce is missing the point, however, and the album is emphatically danceable. Its Intro and Outro tracks allowed Mannie Fresh to cut snippets of Slim's already sparse prose and make them almost completely abstract.

His sophomore release, Powder Shop (1994) moved a bit more into a more narrative, Gangsta territory, creating a Gangsta/Bounce hybrid made popular by his labelmates, UNLV. Some of the highlights include "Eagle St. Bounce," "True to the Game" and "Powder Shop," the latter about a heroin operation. Like a lot of early-'90s New Orleans rap, heroin is the drug most often referenced -- which is a bit unsettling, especially when the rest of the rap world was melloThug'n & Pluggin' lil slimwing with Indo, Chronic and gin 'n' juice. I guess all that dope in the Grunge scene had to come from somewhere. Listening to it now, it's shocking how much Lil Wayne and, even more so, (Young) Turk owe to his sound.

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AMOEBA MUSIC WEEKLY HIP-HOP ROUND UP 10:23:08

Posted by Billyjam, October 23, 2008 08:00am | Post a Comment
                                   Amoeba Music San Francisco Hip-Hop Top Five: 10:23:08

1) Jake One White Van Music (Rhymesayers)

2) Mighty Underdogs Droppin' Science Fiction (Definitive Jux)

3) MF Doom Operation Doomsday (Traffic)

4) Micheal Franti & Spearhead All Rebel Rockers (Anti)

5) Devin the Dude Landing Gear (Razor & Tie Music)

Thanks to Luis at Amoeba Music San Francisco for this week's top five, which includes super talented Seattle producer Jake One and his guest-heavy (over two dozen emcees!) album White Van Music on Rhymesayers in the number one slot. Also with many guest shots, but not near as many as Jake One's record, is the Bay Area supergroup the Mighty Underdogs (Lateef the Truth Speaker, Gift of Gab, & Headnodic) and their recent Def Jux release Droppin' Science Fiction which is the number two top selling hip-hop album at the Haight Street Amoeba this week. As is the case over at the Berkeley Amoeba, the Bay Area's much loved Michael Franti and Spearhead's new album All Rebel Rockers on Anti is also selling well in the San Francisco store. Others on the hip-hop top five include Devin the Dude's Landing Gear and the MF Doom album re-release of Operation Doomsday courtesy of Traffic Entertainment. 

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AMOEBA MUSIC WEEKLY HIP-HOP ROUND UP 10:17:08

Posted by Billyjam, October 17, 2008 08:40am | Post a Comment

murs  Amoeba Music Berkeley Hip-Hop Top Five: 10:17:08

1) Lil Wayne Tha Carter III (Cash Money/Universal)
2) Micheal Franti & Spearhead All Rebel Rockers (Anti)
3) Murs Murs for President (Warner)
4) People Under The Stairs Fun DMC (Gold Dust Media)
5) Jean Grae & 9th Wonder Jeanius (Blacksmith)
mccain tongue debate obama
Joe the Plumber vs. Joe the Butcher? All this recent talk of Joe the Plumber, including on David Letterman's great John "I screwed up" McCain interview last night, which was far more direct and revealing than the debate the previous night, got me thinking of another Joe-- late 80's/early 90's Philly hip-hop producer/remixer Joe "the Butcher" Nicolo. Joe produced such politically charged records as The Goats' "Typical American"/"Burn The Flag" record and the 1991 single/album track "Read My Lips" under the pseudonym A Thousand Points of Light, which heavily sampled and mocked then-president George H. Bush.

Joe the Butcher also produced and released the all original breaks album Butcher Beats And Breaks in 1988 on Atlantic Records (dig for it in the Amoeba crates where it shows up from time to time). Philly born producer/rbutcher beats and breaksecord executive Joe the Butcher became staff producer at Columbia Records in the 80's, doing work with the likes of the Rolling Stones and Billy Joel. But he made his real mark in hip-hop when he created the Columbia distributed Ruffhouse imprint, whose impressive roster included Cypress Hill, The Fugees, Kriss Kross, and the aforementioned (and totally slept on) hometown crew The Goats.

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