Amoeblog

100 Famous Rock Guitar Riffs Offers Concise History of Rock N' Roll

Posted by Billyjam, July 17, 2012 10:00am | Post a Comment
      

Rock music has way too many incredibly memorable guitar riffs to limit a best of list to just one hundred, but the 100 riffs that guitarist Alex Chadwick of The Chicago Music Exchange came up with for the above video performance ain't half bad, and it is a nice informal overview of the history of rock n' roll. Sure it's a subjective selection that includes a lot of mega hits of the genre, and no doubt every rock fan could come up with their own unique list of a hundred best guitar riffs. But I like what Alex has done: from his playing to his choices of riffs, and from how he segues from song to song, to how he plays it on his 1958 Fender Strat all in chronological order. Below is that list of songs and artists in order with the artist names that are blue highlighted linking back to the Amoeba Online Store. where you can find their respective music (CDs, LPs, DVDs) including (in near all cases) the song played by Alex.

SONG/ARTIST PLAYLIST & AMOEBA SHOP LINK OF ALEX'S 100 GUITAR RIFFS (IN ORDER):


1 "Mr. Sandman"  Chet Atkins
2 "Folsom Prison Blues" Johnny Cash
3 "Words of Love"  Buddy Holly
4 "Johnny B Goode"  Chuck Berry
5 "Rumble"  Link Wray

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Mash-Up Of The Week: Wax Audio's Whole Lotta Sabbath, a Led Zeppelin vs Black Sabbath Mash-Up

Posted by Billyjam, September 14, 2010 04:04am | Post a Comment

Wax Audio "Whole Lotta Sabbath" Led Zeppelin vs Black Sabbath Mash-Up

This latest Mash-Up of the Week is a refreshing change from the usual mash-ups being produced these days. Typically mash up producers base their tracks off of either solely contemporary pop songs, or else Wax Audiocurrent pop hits mixed with an older era pop tune (such as Lady GaGa + Kei$ha with Michael Jackson). But "Whole Lotta Sabbath" works exclusively off of classic hard rock sources -- namely Zeppelin and Sabbath.

The audio/video mixer of this mash up is Wax Audio out of Australia, who has been creating mixes for the better part of the past decade. I first learned about him six years ago during the Bush administration when, like myself and the DJs of Mass Destruction crew (DJ Pone, Dawgisht, DJ ALF), he was also doing remixes of George W. Bush speeches. One of Wax Audio's greatest pieces was his remix of John Lennon's "Imagine;" retitling it "Imagine This," he chopped, word by word, Bush saying each lyric of the song and matched it over an instrumental.

I caught up with Wax Audio earlier today (later today in Australia), who told me that the "Whole Lotta Sabbath" video is indeed brand new but that the audio track has been done for a minute. "To be honest, my main motive to make the mix at the time was just to get a real classic rock/metal mash-up out there," he told the Amoeblog. "I'm a big fan of the old bands and there didn't seem to be too many mashes of them at the time. But once I started, I thought the concept was really cool. Sabbath singing about the evil of men and war and Zeppelin praising women and love. The track is entirely comprised of the original Zeppelin and Sabbath tracks ("War Pigs" and "Whole Lotta Love") but there's also plenty of other Zep samples in there too -- "Dazed & Confused" mostly, but a few other bits and pieces. The video shows footage from the Vietnam and Iraq wars and also shows Sabbath performing from both those eras, which is interesting. There's also stuff of the Hindenburg disaster, which relates to the Zeppelin name and a photo of a Celtic Cross I took in Scotland (relating to Sabbath and their penchant for crosses)."

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The Second Weekend in August, 1969 ... Part One

Posted by Whitmore, August 10, 2009 11:38am | Post a Comment
I wonder if anything significant about this past weekend will be remembered in 40 years time, other then Sonia Sotomayor being sworn in as a U.S. Supreme Court Justice and maybe Tiger Woods’ unbelievable play at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. This weekend back in 1969 is definitely remembered for a variety of odd and groovy and trivial and horrifying reasons.
zager and evans 
In the summer of 1969 I was living carefree at 4200 Franklin Avenue in Los Angeles near Griffith Park, with my parents, grandmother, two sisters, and of course our Siamese cat Pandora and a Great Dane named Dijo who would eventually, later in the year, attack me without provocation. She was a nutty and twisted beast. And typical of August in LA, it was annoyingly hot and smoggy. If you didn’t live here back then you just don’t know smog-- lung scorching air under a sky colored golden toasty brown to the apex. Now that’s pollution! This was also the first summer I really started noticing music. I culled some change from my mom’s purse to buy my first single, which also happened to be #1 on the Billboard charts this weekend in 1969, and would be for six consecutive weeks -- "In the Year 2525 (Exordium and Terminus)" by Zager and Evans. In the UK the #1 song was "Honky Tonk Women" by the Rolling Stones, which has noticeably survived the tastes of time better then “2525.” The #1 album in the US was the self-titled second album by Blood, Sweat & Tears. Earlier in the year in March it was briefly at the top of the charts, but with three successive Top 5 singles, it returned once again to the number one position. In 1970 it would win the Grammy Award for Album of the Year.  
 
Also this weekend 40 years ago, the Beatles posed for one of their most iconic images-- the Abbey Road album cover shot of the George, Paul, Ringo and John at the zebra crossing on Abbey Road. They were mostly done working on their newest album and, having applied the last overdubs that morning to the longest track, "I Want You (She's So Heavy)," photographer Iain Macmillan was given ten minutes to get the cover photo done. At 11:35 am on Friday, August 8, 1969, the image was shot. Of course, when the album was released in September, the cover art only fueled the rumors and speculation that Paul McCartney had indeed died in a car crash in 1966 and all the symbolic references only confirmed the sad fact.

Heavenly Bodies 2

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, February 28, 2009 01:35pm | Post a Comment
led zeppelin record label
la nueva reunion luna records labelblackouts men in motion engram records labelkay gardner emerging
scorpions lonesome crow heavy metal world wide record labellord az gotsta be buck wild mass appeal records labelsue saad and the next planet records label
lakeside untouchables solar records labelmoody blues every good boy deserves favour threshold records labelportrait of carrie lucase solar records label
jefferson starship earth record labelearth news record labelrock brigade records label
juan cavero dolores century records labelleon and mary russell wedding album paradise records labeljefferson starship winds of change record label

Books on Film: J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, December 30, 2008 12:07pm | Post a Comment
Elijah Wood as Frodo Baggins in Lord of the Rings
At the end of every year the urge to take in several hours of epic cinema storytelling never fails at filling my darkest mid-winter nights with adventure. What better way is there to spend all that spare "holiday season" time than enjoying a bit of movie magic? Ever since my childhood I've been romanced by the otherworldly wiles of fantasy films, being always at my most vulnerable around Christmas with an easy schedule and a heightened desire to escape into the imagination I possessed as a little girl where I could be as Grace Jones-crazy (Conan the Destroyer), Tanya Roberts-sexy (Sheena), Nigel Terry-valiant, Nicol Willamson-wise (King Arthur and Merlin, respectively, in John Boorman's Excalibur) and Brigitte Neilsen fierce (Red Sonja.) Surely I needn't mention how easily I took to playing Dungeons and Dragons in my teens or how largely Led Zeppelin figured into my lifelong playlist -- anyone who can claim the feeling of being partially raised by fantasy and sci fi flicks takes to rock 'n' role-play like a good sword to a well-oiled sheath. However, I would like to point out how deeply one Englishman, who was recently voted the 92nd "greatest Briton," John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, has irreversibly influenced contemporary popular culture foFrodo lives buttonrever by writing faerie stories to entertain his children. Being a big Tolkien nerd myself, I count him in the topmost of my top ten "greatest Britons," after a handful of musicians, writers and and that Arturus Rex guy.

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