Chabot Space & Science Center's LASERIUM Extended

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, February 13, 2014 02:27pm | Post a Comment

An event so electrifying, the Bay Area couldn't bear to let it go! LASERIUM® The Cosmic Laser Concert laserium chabot space and scienceand the Chabot Space & Science Center in Oakland are extending the classic laser light show set to the beats of such rock icons as Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, and The Beatles! Visit the Chabot planetarium for a stunning light show that is music for your eyes.

Whether you are a fan from the past or new to the show, LASERIUM® draws you into the light. See it, hear it, experience it, again for the first time. Get your tickets HERE!

Happy 70th Birthday Jimmy Page

Posted by Billyjam, January 9, 2014 01:30pm | Post a Comment

Jimmy Page BBC Interview with Kirsty Lang (2012)

James Patrick Page, the man best known as rock guitar legend and Led Zeppelin main main Jimmy Page, celebrates his 70th birthday today. And for the occasion this Amoeblog celebrates with a live concert clip and two interviews from two eras four decades apart with the man who during a BBC1 television interview in 1957 when the then only 13 year old young Page, who was on as part of a group performing "Mama Don't Want to Skiffle Anymore" and "In Them Ol' Cottonfields Back Home," told the BBC interviewer that when he grew up he wanted not be a full-time musician but "to do biological research" in finding a cure for cancer. That classic early Page clip is included in the most recent (December 2012) BBC TV interview segment with Kirsty Lang. The other (much shorter) interview is with Page along with Led Zeppelin bandmate Robert Plant from a press conference back in New York City in September 1970 during the band's heyday. Meanwhile in the live concert clip, which is of Jimmy playing "Stairway To Heaven" double neck guitar solo, he appears to have been partying a bit before the show but still manages to nail it.

Continue reading...

20 Essential Records You Need on Vinyl

Posted by Billy Gil, April 10, 2013 09:21am | Post a Comment

20 Essential Records You Need on Vinyl

Use the promo code vinyl10 to get 10% off any new and used vinyl on

In honor of the upcoming Record Store Day, I decided to make a list of 20 records I think everyone should own on vinyl. Take this Record Store Day to build a nice foundation for your record collection. I picked this list based on pretty arbitrary criteria, including what critics generally think are great, what I think is great, what I think particularly sounds good on analog-warm vinyl, and what you won’t have to pay $100 for or scour for (e.g. no hard-to-find ’90s vinyl or things out of print). I also left it to one album per artist. These aren't in any particular order. Send any omissions to this list to Or just leave a comment!

The Beatles Revolver

The Beatles – Revolver

In my mind, The White Album is the greatest Beatles album, but you can’t beat the utterly perfect one-disc punch of Revolver. It should go without saying that every Beatles album is essential and is worth owning on vinyl yadda yadda, but if you have to start somewhere, do it here. Their catalog was recently reissued on vinyl in stereo mix, so you should have no trouble finding them if you’re just starting out — and you should have no trouble finding quality replacements, if your old Beatles LPs are worn out.

Concerning Hobbit Rock: Exploring A Beloved Micro-Genre

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, January 25, 2013 06:41pm | Post a Comment
Given all the hubbub this past holiday season surrounding the opening of Peter Jackson's newest venture into J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle Earth The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, I think it's time to shift the spotlight onto a little known sub-subgenre tucked away, much like a hobbit hole snugly abutting a hillside, within Amoeba Music's extensive Rock Various Artists section: Hobbit Rock.

amoeba music genre subgenre rock various artists compilations fringe cult hobbit rock tolkien lost seventies classic mediaeval mediaval english j r r tolkein lord of the rings frodo bilbo baggins

Now, I have to admit the first time I clocked the Hobbit Rock bin card I was taken aback, gagging on the  question: what the heck is this? Browsing though the titles it began to make sense. Much like unfolding a map of Middle Earth to explore a visual representation of the diverse cultures and histories that Tolkien invented to people his fictional universe, browsing Hobbit Rock is to peruse a Led Zeppelin hobbit rock lord of the rings lyrics robert plant hippy hippie rock collection of music that either inspires sincere impressions of Middle Earth or is unequivocally informed by Tolkein's fantasy writings.

In other words, if an artist makes blatant Tolkien-esque references in lyric  (apparently Led Zeppelin couldn't resist slipping more than a little Middle Earthliness into practically every album) or otherwise artistic content (see my list below) then that, friends, is pure, gem mint ten Hobbit Rock.

Albums Out Nov. 19: Led Zeppelin, Tim Hecker/Daniel Lopatin, LA Vampires/Maria Minerva and More

Posted by Billy Gil, November 19, 2012 05:48pm | Post a Comment

Album Picks:

Tim Hecker, Daniel Lopatin - Instrumental Tourist

Tim HeckerCD $9.98

LP $19.98

Tim Hecker and Daniel Lopatin aka Oneohtrix Point Never’s Instrumental Tourist brings out the best in two major figures in electronic music, producing a musical endeavor that’s as interested in pleasing its audience as it is turning over new stones. “Uptown Psychedelia’s” mechanical noise ebbs in and out while an eastern-influenced synth line wriggles chaotically. While more glacially paced, “Scene From a French Zoo” eschews the notion that ambient music need be peaceful or serene; its foreboding tone indicates some unstated melancholy. “Vacation for Thomas Mann” grows more ethereal as the pair set their synths skyward. Appropriately titled “Intrusions” tracks back to themes introduced in “Uptown Psychedelia” with industrial noise bursts, though it retains the ethereal feel of “Vacation for Thomas Mann,” until it gradually gets nastier and disintegrates. “Whole Earth Tascam” builds tension with noise and synthesized vocals before breaking apart to the sound of birds chirping, but then it gets even tenser than before. The song’s intriguing push-and-pull makes it the most soundtracky song on the album and definitely a highlight. “GRM Blue II” makes for a quick, strangely melodic respite full of glassy tones, while the more aggressive “GRM Blue III” is full of squelching sounds like an alien response to earthling radio signals, challenging the listener as the song stretches to nearly six minutes. The albums final tracks continue pushing the album’s ethereal and unsettling qualities in seemingly equal measure, particularly on the Eastern touches and wind instruments of “Grey Geisha,” never losing listener attention, though Instrumental Tourist can be a demanding listen. By keeping things unfussy and not overly layered, Hecker and Lopatin create excitement in their interplay. Their union proves not to be a collective patting on the back but rather another notch in the post of excellence for both artists.

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  1  2  3  4  5  >>  NEXT