Amoeblog

Music History Monday: March 31

Posted by Jeff Harris, March 31, 2014 11:04am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: March 31, 1935 - Musician and co-founder of A&M Records, Herb Alpert (born Herbert Alpert in Los Angeles, CA). Happy 79th Birthday, Herb!
 


On this day in music history: March 31, 1949 - RCA Victor Records releases the first commercially available 45 RPM record available for domestic sale. That first single is "Tekarkana Baby" by country music legend Eddy Arnold. Written by Fred Rose, Arnold's version of the song will top the Billboard Best Selling Retail Folk Records chart (existing prior to the Country & Western chart) for one week. The label will press the initial run of the single on clear green vinyl. RCA will develop the new format in response to Columbia Records introducing the 33 1/3 RPM long playing LP the previous year. Pressed on vinyl (or styrene, which is developed by Columbia) rather than the fragile shellac discs that 78's were manufactured from, the 7" discs will grow in popularity, eventually overtaking the 78 in sales by the mid 1950's and becoming the dominant physical single format until the end of the 1980's. Happy 65th Birthday to the 45!
 


On this day in music history: March 31, 1958 - "Johnny B. Goode" by Chuck Berry is released. Written by Chuck Berry in 1955, the semi autobiographical song will be partially inspired by his longtime piano player Johnnie Johnson, though pianist Lafayette Leake will play on the single and not Johnson. "Goode's" opening riff will be lifted from R&B pioneer Louis Jordan's 1946 hit "Ain't That Just Like A Woman." The track is recorded at Chess Studios in Chicago on January 6, 1958 and features Berry backed by musicians Willie Dixon (bass), Lafayette Leake (piano), and Fred Below (drums). Chuck Berry's version will peak at #2 on the Billboard R&B Best Sellers chart and #8 on the Pop Best Sellers chart in June of 1958. Regarded as one of the quintessential rock & roll songs, it will be covered numerous times over the years by dozens of artists. Berry's original version is included on the Voyager Golden Record (a gold plated titanium disc with messages and music recorded on it) attached to the Voyager spacecraft in 1977 representing rock & roll music. The song will also be featured in the film Back To The Future in 1985, where in a humorous plot twist Berry's fictional cousin Marvin Berry overhears the song being performed by actor Michael J. Fox (actually sung by Mark Campbell of Jack Mack & The Heart Attack) who calls his cousin to tell him he's just heard the "new sound" he's been looking for. The original single of "Johnny B. Goode" is backed with the Berry-penned "Around And Around," which will also become a rock & roll standard that is also widely covered, most notably by The Rolling Stones, Grateful Dead, The Animals, and David Bowie. Chuck Berry's original recording of "Johnny B. Goode" is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999.
 

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12 Albums to Look for in Spring

Posted by Billy Gil, March 17, 2014 11:57am | Post a Comment

Here are 12 great albums that are coming out soon. Better save your pennies!

Black LipsUnderneath the Rainbow (LP, Limited Edition LP or CD)

black lips underneath the rainbow lpOut March 18

Atlanta’s finest, scuzziest garage rock band is back with its seventh album. It’s co-produced by The Black Keys’ Patrick Carney. The video for “Boys in the Wood” has all kinds of homoerotic and drug-fueled forest mayhem.

 

 

Perfect PussySay Yes to Love (LP or CD)

perfect pussy say yes to love lpOut March 18

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Chabot Space & Science Center's LASERIUM Extended

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, February 13, 2014 02:27pm | Post a Comment

An event so electrifying, the Bay Area couldn't bear to let it go! LASERIUM® The Cosmic Laser Concert laserium chabot space and scienceand the Chabot Space & Science Center in Oakland are extending the classic laser light show set to the beats of such rock icons as Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, and The Beatles! Visit the Chabot planetarium for a stunning light show that is music for your eyes.

Whether you are a fan from the past or new to the show, LASERIUM® draws you into the light. See it, hear it, experience it, again for the first time. Get your tickets HERE!

Happy 70th Birthday Jimmy Page

Posted by Billyjam, January 9, 2014 01:30pm | Post a Comment

Jimmy Page BBC Interview with Kirsty Lang (2012)


James Patrick Page, the man best known as rock guitar legend and Led Zeppelin main main Jimmy Page, celebrates his 70th birthday today. And for the occasion this Amoeblog celebrates with a live concert clip and two interviews from two eras four decades apart with the man who during a BBC1 television interview in 1957 when the then only 13 year old young Page, who was on as part of a group performing "Mama Don't Want to Skiffle Anymore" and "In Them Ol' Cottonfields Back Home," told the BBC interviewer that when he grew up he wanted not be a full-time musician but "to do biological research" in finding a cure for cancer. That classic early Page clip is included in the most recent (December 2012) BBC TV interview segment with Kirsty Lang. The other (much shorter) interview is with Page along with Led Zeppelin bandmate Robert Plant from a press conference back in New York City in September 1970 during the band's heyday. Meanwhile in the live concert clip, which is of Jimmy playing "Stairway To Heaven" double neck guitar solo, he appears to have been partying a bit before the show but still manages to nail it.

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Music History Monday: July 29

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 29, 2013 12:05pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 29, 1953 - Geddy Lee (born Gary Lee Weinrib in North York, Ontario, Canada), bassist and lead vocalist of Rush. Happy 60th Birthday, Geddy!
 


On this day in music history: July 29, 1967 - “Light My Fire” by The Doors hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks. Written by Robby Krieger, John Densmore, Ray Manzarek, and Jim Morrison, it is the biggest hit for the L.A.-based rock band.  Composed mainly by guitarist Krieger, it will be credited to the entire band when he brings the unfinished song into the studio for the other band members to expand upon. The nearly seven-minute-long track is edited down to under three minutes for single release when it receives heavy airplay as an LP cut. The edited mono single version will also present the song at its originally recorded speed. The more commonly heard stereo LP version was mixed at a slightly slower speed due to an error made during the mixing process. Released as the second single from the bands’ self-titled debut album, it will quickly become a radio staple. Entering the Hot 100 at #93 on June 3, 1967, it will reach the top of the chart eight weeks later. “Light My Fire” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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