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New End of the World Music!

Posted by Billy Gil, December 21, 2012 01:33pm | Post a Comment

Are you as sick as I am of seeing “It’s the End of the World as We Know It” quoted on Facebook? Here are some newer tunes inspired by the end of the Mayan Calendar.

Dent MayDent May – “2099”

Just released this week, Mississippi indie pop great Dent May has released a dance-pop track inspired by the end of the world — which will take place in 87 years, apparently (actually that seems sort of plausible). “Are you afraid of what tomorrow’s gonna bring?” he asks before declaring “If we all die by a nuclear war/We’re gonna go out on the dancing floor.” Dent May’s Do Things was released this year on Animal Collective’s Paw Tracks label, it’s great and super underrated, check it out!

 

 

Hunter HuntedHunter Hunted – “End of the World”

L.A. band Hunter Hunted have released this video to their KCRW-touted track “End of the World.” Despite its Road Warrior look, they make the apocalypse seem like a lot of fun. They’re at the Troubador Feb. 12.

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Albums Out Nov. 19: Led Zeppelin, Tim Hecker/Daniel Lopatin, LA Vampires/Maria Minerva and More

Posted by Billy Gil, November 19, 2012 05:48pm | Post a Comment

Album Picks:

Tim Hecker, Daniel Lopatin - Instrumental Tourist

Tim HeckerCD $9.98

LP $19.98

Tim Hecker and Daniel Lopatin aka Oneohtrix Point Never’s Instrumental Tourist brings out the best in two major figures in electronic music, producing a musical endeavor that’s as interested in pleasing its audience as it is turning over new stones. “Uptown Psychedelia’s” mechanical noise ebbs in and out while an eastern-influenced synth line wriggles chaotically. While more glacially paced, “Scene From a French Zoo” eschews the notion that ambient music need be peaceful or serene; its foreboding tone indicates some unstated melancholy. “Vacation for Thomas Mann” grows more ethereal as the pair set their synths skyward. Appropriately titled “Intrusions” tracks back to themes introduced in “Uptown Psychedelia” with industrial noise bursts, though it retains the ethereal feel of “Vacation for Thomas Mann,” until it gradually gets nastier and disintegrates. “Whole Earth Tascam” builds tension with noise and synthesized vocals before breaking apart to the sound of birds chirping, but then it gets even tenser than before. The song’s intriguing push-and-pull makes it the most soundtracky song on the album and definitely a highlight. “GRM Blue II” makes for a quick, strangely melodic respite full of glassy tones, while the more aggressive “GRM Blue III” is full of squelching sounds like an alien response to earthling radio signals, challenging the listener as the song stretches to nearly six minutes. The albums final tracks continue pushing the album’s ethereal and unsettling qualities in seemingly equal measure, particularly on the Eastern touches and wind instruments of “Grey Geisha,” never losing listener attention, though Instrumental Tourist can be a demanding listen. By keeping things unfussy and not overly layered, Hecker and Lopatin create excitement in their interplay. Their union proves not to be a collective patting on the back but rather another notch in the post of excellence for both artists.

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Catching Fever at Los Globos

Posted by Billy Gil, June 26, 2012 11:21am | Post a Comment
Fever Los GlobosFor anyone lamenting the dearth of places to dance in L.A., Fever is your savior. LA Record’s Daiana Feuer recently started the monthly night at Los Globos in Silverlake, hosting a dance party for electronic music that doesn’t fit a specific genre, from psychedelic dance music to alien disco and any number of in betweens. This Tuesday sees performances from heralded local acts LA Vampires and High Places.
 
“Fever is about avant-garde disco, auditory illusions, garage dub tronica, theatrical, ethereal pop, just forward-thinking weird dance music that's almost unclassifiable,” she says.
 
Feuer is the executive editor of LA Record, which since 2005 has ably documented the LA music scene. Fever is just the latest bit of fun from the Cal Arts grad, who also runs The New L.A. Folk Festival, which puts on shows featuring new folk weirdness around the Los Angeles area, including The New LA Folk Fest, the latest of which takes place Aug. 4 at Zorthian Ranch in Altadena.
 
Feuer says her roots are in dance music, having grown up in Florida, but acquired a taste for experimental, psychedelic music experiences while living in California. The aim of Fever is to create a space where the two can live simultaneously, finding a middle place between underground and above ground, she says.
 
“I like music that makes me want to shake my tailfeather but also stirs up my brain,” Feuer says. “I’m really interested in creating experiences. I want people to let loose like children yet also perceive this as conceptual art.”
 
The night involves not only music performances, but also art installations, performance and video art, DJs, confetti, souvenirs, party favors, costumes and toys. Thus far, Fever has involved local talent (musical and otherwise) such as Thelma Houston & Janitor, Busdriver, Pharaohs, Nite Jewel, Hecuba, Dreamers, Butchy Fuego, Moomaw, Young Adults, Diva, PDA, Mor Elian, Alia Penner, Future Eyes, Gifted & Blessed and Captain Ahab. Feuer hopes to open the night to travelling artists and more nights than just one Tuesday a month at Los Globos.
 
This particular evening is exciting for a number of reasons. First of all, LA Vampires put on an insane show. You can even read all about when they opened for Zola Jesus last year in my review of that show.  High Places I’ve also seen a number of times, and their shows and records just get more and more entrancing — can’t wait for their new record, Original Colors, which is set to come out in October on Thrill Jockey. I like the idea of this paring, the cerebral beats of High Places with LA Vampires’ visceral take. Plus, Sodapop from local underground hip-hop label Anticon will be DJing at 10, and I’ll be DJing with Feuer between sets. What could be better than that!

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Local Bits: Best Coast, Ty Segall & White Fence, Derde Verde

Posted by Billy Gil, April 27, 2012 12:09pm | Post a Comment
Best Coast The Only PlaceBest Coast Covers Fleetwood Mac’s “Storms”
 
From Pitchfork, dad-rock loving duo Best Coast has covered a song by their beloved Fleetwood Mac, “Storms,” from their underrated 1979 album Tusk. For now, you have to track to about 58:10 in this edition of BBC Radio 6’s Radcliffe & Maconie show
 
Here’s the cool part: You can get the cover on a 7” that comes with The Only Place at independent record stores. Preorder your copy of The Only Place here at Amoeba and you’ll get a copy of the 7” with the moody and beautiful “Storms,” which shows off Bethany Cosentino’s growing confidence as a singer of uncommon power.
 
Ty Segall & White Fence – “Time”
 
I interviewed Ty Segall a while back about his collaboration with White Fence, called Hair, a match made in garage-pop heaven that was released this week — pick it up here. Here’s a fun psychedelic video of their song “Time” recorded for Room 205.

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Show Report: Zola Jesus at the Echoplex

Posted by Billy Gil, November 1, 2011 06:06pm | Post a Comment
LA Vampires started this Halloween show at the Echoplex with a psych-dance set that perfectly set the stage for Zola Jesus. Amanda Brown’s post-Pocahaunted project, in which she collaborates with artists such as Matrix Metals and Zola Jesus (aka Nika Roza Danilova) to fashion dubbed out psych-tronica that belies its goth veneer by injecting with positive vibes and beats from early techno. Brown’s freaky dancing and faded vocals pull you into the trance created by her collaborators’ loops and synths. Her bleached-blonde mop perfectly matched that of Danilova, who came out during a sick cover of The Cardigans“Carnival” to dance and sing alongside Brown. In the dark venue, the two looked like tiny wraiths writhing around onstage intoxicatingly.

 



Danilova, meanwhile, dug into a gauzy set that relied heavily on her recently released Conatus. Songs like Conatus’ “Hikikomori” and “Seekir,” the poppier songs on the record, came through with as much or more power than on record, their hooks amplified to new extremes. The Echoplex tends to add a lot of natural reverb to shows, and this at times added to the already soaked songs to the point that it was a deluge, almost overpowering. I haven’t seen Zola Jesus play live before, but I’m willing to bet her shows are always this dreamy. The music just sort of pours over you, and Danilova swings her arms and dances in flowy garb. Everything feels the way Fleetwod Mac’s “Gyspy” video looks.

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