Amoeblog

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 06/06/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, June 1, 2009 04:01pm | Post a Comment
 

New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:

Buraka Som Sistema  

IC19 (MAD DECENT RECENT REMIX)
12” MAD098

In your face bass jams straight from Mad Decent. Remixes from TOY SELECTAH, TOTALLY KROSSED OUT, and DJ SEGA will fill the floor with cabooses getting loose. 



Adam Mars
hall 
 

OWLS WON'T-S.TROXLER
12" SIMPLE0939

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 05/23/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 17, 2009 07:21pm | Post a Comment
 

New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:
 
Ghost - FREEDOM OF THOUGHT EP #1 12" BNB046
UK hip hop producer GHOST drops this dope as hell 5 track EP mixing 2 rap tracks and 3 beat driven instrumental head nodders that fans of NINJA TUNE, DJ SHADOW, RJD2 and the like will dig. One rap cut is a brand new remix of DJ IQ's "ELEVATE" feat JEHST on vocals. Don't sleep.
 
Tiga - SHOES 12" DIFB1216T 
First single from his forthcoming LP is a delicious slice of non conformist pop feat a mystery female guest and prod by SOULWAX! Killer mixes from MR OIZO and GREEN VELVET take this superstar DJ / fashion icon into the pop stratosphere. Not to be missed indeed.
 
Deborah Jordan - NOTHING LASTS 7" FM013
 
Future Beat Investigators - LOUDER 12" RAF048
 
Ghost - BASIC INSTINCT (NATURAL SELF) 12" BNB027
 
Ghost - LET EM KNOW 12" BNB017
 
Ghost - SELDOM SEEN OFTEN HEARD DLP BNB025LP
 
Kazahaya - REMEMBER HIP HOP 12" BNB047
 
Medusa Edits - REFLECTION SERIES #4 12" ME004
 
Linkwood - PRIME NUMBERS 3 12" PN03
 
Arcadion - FLY VISION 12" DC104
 
Castle Of Freaks - BEEN A LONG TIME 12" WMR004
 
Busta Rhymes Vs J Credible - REMIXES 12" WMR003 
 
Coolhurst - BAMBA GAS COIN 12" NANA001
 
Depeche Mode - WRONG - CASPA RMX 12" 12BONG40
 
Ebony Bones - THE MUZIK 7" SBESTSX72
 
Emperor Machine - KANANANA 12" DC96
 
Evil Nine - ICICLES 12" MAPA049
 
Exile - STAY TUNED EP 12" PLG81
 
Feature Cast - ONE STEP RE-EDIT 7" DP004
 
Friendly Fires - JUMP IN THE POOL RMX 12" XLT439
 
Jazzanova - I CAN SEE (TELEPATICOS) 12" WPBH001
 
Lily Allen - NOT FAIR (PIC DISC) 7" REG153
 
Little Dragon - TWICE REMIX EP 12" PFG123
 
Parallels - ULTRALIGHT EP 12" TINAE017
 
Phoenix - LISTZOMANIA 12" VVR703076
 
TV On The Radio - DANCING CHOOSE RMXS 12" BAD2837
 
Telonius - LIKE WHAT (GLIMMERS RMX) 12" GOMMADT001
 
Various - KUNG FU SUPER SOUNDS LP DWVR002
 
Acid Circus - V SNARES 12” TTT23

Joker's Wild, or Batman Degree Zero: The Dark Knight (2008)

Posted by Charles Reece, August 10, 2008 10:36pm | Post a Comment
The Joker


There is an old story about a worker suspected of stealing: every evening, as he leaves the factory, the wheel-barrow he rolls in front of him is carefully inspected. The guards can find nothing. It is always empty. Finally, the penny drops: what the worker is stealing are the wheelbarrows themselves ... -- Slavoj Zizek, p. 1, Violence

I just happened to start reading Slavoj Zizek's new book, Violence, shortly after I saw Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight and found both to serendipitously complement each other. Zizek begins his book with the little tale of theft quoted above, which he uses as a grounding metaphor in analyzing our approach to violence. Too often we're concerned with its subjective effects (who was hurt and by what, i.e., what's in the wheelbarrow), rather than its objective status (the symbolic order that gives form and definition to the violent act, i.e., the wheelbarrow itself). For example, an anti-semitic remark doesn't constitute hate speech -- isn't violent -- for a Nazi who exists in a context where "the Jew" is defined outside of humanity, and thus moral concern. It is the functioning symbolic order that allows everyday people to exist in a system perpetuating violence on others without seeing how their own normality is defined by what it violently excludes. This is what the Joker is getting at when he says to Harvey Dent:
 
Nobody panics when they expect people to get killed. Nobody panics when things go according to plan, even if the plans are horrifying. If I tell the press that tomorrow a gangbanger will get shot, or a truckload of soldiers will get blown up, nobody panics. But when I say one little old mayor will die, everyone loses their minds! Introduce a little anarchy, you upset the established order, and everything becomes chaos. I am an agent of chaos. And you know the thing about chaos, Harvey? It’s fair.
 
Sure, we (represented here as Gotham City residents) might see the gangbanger's death as violent, but always as subjective violence, an act by an individual on another individual, not as a sign that the cultural system itself is violent. The difference between the violence against a gangbanger and against the mayor is that only the latter is perceived to be a threat to the normal order of things, whereas the former is already written into the cultural bill as the price of doing business as usual. The Joker is an agent of chaos, because he's the embodiment of pure objective violence. That's why he assures Harvey that killing his girlfriend, Rachel (Bruce Wayne's love interest, as well), and leaving him horribly disfigured as Two-Face was "nothing personal." As such, the Joker's actions can only be read as chaotic, senseless, or just plain nuts. He doesn't put Gotham's citizens (including its criminals) through a series of terroristic spins on the prisoner's dilemma for personal gain, revenge or as the result of some childhood trauma -- he's an ascetic without a real history. Rather, his only goal and source of pleasure is in making his victims face up to the abstracted violent substructure around which their culture is configured. Sounding like Jack Nance and looking like he's spent time in A Clockwork Orange and Ichi the Killer with fashion tips from Malcolm McLaren, the Joker provides a scarred face to the invisible logic of capitalism, with cracking make-up and a forced smile. He's pure desire without an object, paradoxically making the impersonal personal and invisible visible. Regarding this invisible and "fundamental systemic violence of capitalism," Zizek writes:
 
[M]uch more uncanny than any direct pre-capitalist socio-ideological violence: this violence is no longer attributable to concrete individuals and their "evil" intentions, but is purely "objective," systemic, anonymous. [Some stuff about Lacan's Real versus reality that I will spare you.]  We can experience this gap [between the reality of people and what's being defined as reality by the logic of capitalism] in a palpable way when one visits a country where life is obviously in shambles. We see a lot of ecological decay and human misery. However, the economist's report that one reads afterwards informs us that the country's economic situation is "financially sound" -- reality doesn't matter, what matters is the situation of capital ... -- p. 12-3, ibid.

Stocks wouldn't keep rising for a corporation that exploits third-world misery if that repressed misery took on a subjective quality for the investors. For capital to keep growing, said misery has to remain purely objective, an abstract cost that's been symbolically excluded out of our day-to-day concerns. The Joker is the same unbounded desire that drives capitalism. Without any object or goal to satisfy him, he exists outside of our rational system and can only be stopped with violence. He can't be beat, however, only beaten, because the solution to the problem he presents is the problem itself: repression of systemic violence. (Batman once tried to reason with him -- understand him -- in Alan Moore's The Killing Joke with miserable results.) At best, Gotham City can return to the status quo by forgetting him -- define him out existence as insane and lock him away in its local Id repository, Arkham Asylum. Or they could kill him, but Gotham's local hero of repression has only one rule: he doesn't kill.
 
The Batman