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John Lennon: Love Songs

Posted by Billyjam, February 14, 2013 10:20am | Post a Comment

John Lennon "Oh My Love"

When you think about it nearly every pop song is about love in some form or another. Most songs on the topic are either about celebrating being in love or alternately mourning falling out of love and wanting to get back there. Of the literally millions of songs on love I think John Lennon wrote and recorded some of the most touching and poignant ones - two of which I have included here on this Valentine's Day. Above is "Oh My Love" with Lennon on piano and George Harrison joining him on guitar. The song was written by John Lennon with Yoko Ono and first appeared in 1971 on Lennon's album Imagine on which George Harrison contributed to several songs in addition to this one. "Oh My Love" can also be found on Wonsaponatime: Selections from Lennon Anthology 

Then below is the simple but powerful Lennon song "Love" (with lyrics in the video) that was first released on the 1970 album John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band. As anyone who has that album knows the piano part at the beginning (and end) is really quiet but builds in volume. So you will notice that the version below is the later remix of the song with the sound levels more equalized on these two parts. The posthumous version of "Love" below appeared a dozen years after the initial release on the 1982 compilation The John Lennon Collection, and later appeared on such other collections as the John Lennon Anthology box set.

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Music History Monday: July 30

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 30, 2012 01:17pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 30, 1958 - Singer/Songwriter Kate Bush (born Catherine Bush in Bexleyheath, Kent, UK). Happy 54rd Birthday, Kate!!


On this day in music history: July 30, 1966 - "Wild Thing" by The Troggs hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks. Written by Chip Taylor (real name James Wesley Voight, brother of Oscar winning actor Jon Voight), it is the biggest hit for the UK rock band. The Troggs will record the song at Olympic Studios in London in early 1966 in just two takes. The record will break in the bands' native UK first following an appearance on the television program Thank Your Lucky Stars. When "Wild Thing" is released as a single in the US, it will be the subject of a dispute over its distribution rights. It will be released simultaneously on both Atco and Fontana Records, making it the only #1 single in Billboard chart history to appear on the chart on two different labels at the same time.


On this day in music history: July 30, 1968 - The Beatles begin recording "Hey Jude" at Abbey Road Studios in London, in Studio 2. Written by Paul McCartney, he is inspired to write the song (originally titled "Hey Jules") while driving over to visit bandmate John Lennon's five-year-old son Julian and former wife Cynthia. Paul begins writing the song to console Julian after his parents have separated and are in the process of getting divorced. McCartney will later state another inspiration for the song will be his recent break up with long term girlfriend actress Jane Asher. John Lennon will also feel that Paul is speaking (indirectly) to him in the song as he has begun his relationship with Yoko Ono at this time. The master take of the song will be recorded at Trident Studios in Soho the next day. It will become the bands' biggest single, spending nine weeks at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and selling over four million copies.

Pat Thomas signs "LISTEN, WHITEY! Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965 – 1975" at The Booksmith in SF, 4/10

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 15, 2012 04:46pm | Post a Comment
Listen Whitey Sounds of Black Power Pat Thomas Booksmith Amoeba San Francisco

On April 10, 2012 at 7:30pm, our friends at The Booksmith will host reissue producer/music scholar Pat Thomas for a signing of his new book LISTEN, WHITEY! Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965 – 1975 and the companion album (out now on Light in the Attic Records), which is being called the definitive Black Power aural document!

Over a five year period, Pat Thomas befriended key leaders of the seminal Black Power Movement,Elaine Brown Huey P Newton Black Forum Motown Records dug through Huey Newton’s archives at Stanford University, spent countless hours and thousands of dollars on eBay, and talked to rank and file Black Panther Party members, uncovering dozens of obscure albums, singles, and stray tapes. Along the way, he began to piece together a time period (1967-1974) when revolutionaries like Bobby Seale, Eldridge Cleaver, Angela Davis, and Stokely Carmichael were seen as pop culture icons and musicians like Gil Scott-Heron, The Last Poets, Bob Dylan, and John Lennon were seen as revolutionaries.

LISTEN, WHITEY! chronicles the forgotten history of Motown Records; from 1970 to 1973, Motown’sBlack Forum Motown Records Black Power subsidiary label, Black Forum, released politically charged albums by Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, Langston Hughes, Bill Cosby and Ossie Davis, and many others, and explores the musical connections between Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Graham Nash, the Partridge Family (!?!) and the Black Power movement. Obscure recordings produced by SNCC, Ron Karenga’s US, the Tribe and other African-American socio­political organizations of the late 1960s and early ’70s are examined along with the Isley Brothers, Nina Simone, Archie Shepp, Art Ensemble of Chicago, Clifford Thornton, Watts Prophets, The Last Poets, Gene McDaniels, Roland Black Forum Motown RecordsKirk, Horace Silver, Angela Davis, H. Rap Brown, Stanley Crouch, and others that spoke out against op­pression. Thomas further focuses on Black Consciousness poetry (from the likes of Jayne Cortez, wife of Ornette Coleman), inspired re­ligious recordings that infused god and Black Nationalism, and obscure regional and privately pressed Black Power 7-inch soul singles from across America. The text is ac­companied by over 200 large sized, full-color reproductions of album covers and 45 rpm sin­gles, most of which readers will have never seen before.

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Read John Lennon's Angry Letter to the McCartneys Circa 1971

Posted by Miss Ess, April 15, 2011 11:43am | Post a Comment

John Lennon wrote this blistering letter to the McCartneys in 1971, when tensions over The Beatles' breakup were still running very high. The letter goes up for auction soon, and thus it has hit the web and our eyes 40 years or so after it was written. The relationship between the two most famous songwriters ever is still fascinating, even after all this time...

john lennon letter

lennon letter

It's a little hard on the eyes; for the full transcript, head here.

Remembering December 8th, 1980: Rest in Peace, John Lennon

Posted by Billyjam, December 8, 2010 09:30am | Post a Comment
John Lennon "Give Me Some Truth" (HD version)

The videos above and below are both in honor of one of the true greats of our age, John Lennon, whose beautiful creative life was brought to a premature, screeching halt exactly thirty years ago today (December 8th, 1980) when he was senselessly gunned down outside his home in New York City.

John Lennon holds a special place in the hearts of so many people and those of us who were alive on this date 30 years ago have our own personal memory of that tragic night and of learning the news. For me, I had emigrated a year earlier to America from Ireland and was living in the Upper West Side, a couple of miles from where the murder took place.

Like most people I knew, I too was a big John Lennon (and Beatles) fan. And if you lived in NYC at the time, odds of a Lennon sighting were pretty good. He was always out and about. He and Yoko would sometimes come to the Japanese macrobiotic restaurant I worked at as a waiter at the time (Souen on Broadway near 91st - long gone location). The album Double Fantasy had been released a few months earlier but was still a "new album" by 1980 standards, back when the shelf life of music seemed much longer than these days. It was on my turntable at the time, although I must admit that it was not my favorite Lennon release. Anyway, none of that mattered once the tragic news hit that night, which I learned when one of my room mates came rushing into my room with the unbelievable announcement.

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