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Music History Monday: January 5

Posted by Jeff Harris, January 5, 2015 10:44am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: January 5, 1969Bayou Country, the second album by Creedence Clearwater Revival, is released. Produced by John Fogerty, it is recorded at RCA Studios in Hollywood in Late 1968. Sharp and fine tuned from heavy touring in support of their self-titled debut album, CCR will re-enter the studio in the Fall of 1968 to record their second LP. It will mark the start of an impressive run of hits for the El Cerrito-based band, spinning off the hit single "Proud Mary" (#2 Pop for 3 weeks), as well as the rock radio staple "Born On The Bayou" (the B-side of "Proud Mary"). The album is remastered on CD for its 40th anniversary in 2008, featuring four bonus tracks. Bayou Country will peak at number seven on the Billboard Top 200, number 41 on the R&B album chart, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.


 

On this day in music history: January 5, 1974The Singles 1969-1973 by The Carpenters hits #1 on the Billboard Top 200 for one week. Produced by Jack Daughtery and Richard & Karen Carpenter, it is recorded at A&M Studios in Hollywood from January 1969 - April 1973. Their first greatest hits album, the 12-track compilation features hit singles from The Carpenters first four years on A&M Records. The album's unique sequencing includes musical introductions and segues between the tracks. Original vinyl LP pressings were packaged in a gatefold sleeve with a 12-page booklet featuring photos and song lyrics. It will become the brother and sister duos' biggest-selling album worldwide (also topping the UK album chart for 17 weeks). The Singles 1969-1973 is certified 7x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Fools In Love Songs

Posted by Billyjam, April 1, 2013 01:31pm | Post a Comment
There are a lot of songs on the topic of fools and even more songs on being in love. But for today, April Fool's Day, I have assembled some random songs about both - about fools in love or people falling foolishly into love. We've all been there and done that and hence can relate, no doubt, to the selection of songs I've assembled below (via YouTube) about fools in love.

Included is the song "Fools In Love" by Joe Jackson - the single off his great album Look Sharp in which he cynically muses, albeit from first hand experience, on: "Fools in love, are there any creatures more pathetic? Fools in love, never knowing when they've lost the game." Other songs about fools in love include the 1956 #1 hit from the very young Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers "Why Do Fools Fall In Love" (a live TV rendition from 1956 from WNEW's The Frankie Lane Show with a funny interview beforehand). The song, which has been covered by folks such as Diana Ross and Joe Ely, poses that eternal question: "Why do fools fall in love?"  Also below is Journey-man Steve Perry's 80's pop rock ballad mega-hit "Foolish Heart" (off his Street Talk LP) and Rod Stewart's version of Elvin Bishop's hit "Fooled Around And Fell In Love."

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Album Picks: Ty Segall Band, Diiv, Flaming Lips, A Place to Bury Strangers

Posted by Billy Gil, June 26, 2012 06:09pm | Post a Comment
ty segall band slaughterhouseSo much great stuff was released today. First of all, Ty Segall Band's Slaughterhouse is blowing my mind right now. When I talked to Ty Segall earlier this year, he said he’d be releasing an album with his backing band that would sound like “totally heavy, fuzzed-out Sabbath, Blue Cheer-like noise rock kinda stuff.” Turns out that was no bullshit; Slaughterhouse, the second of three planned releases this year from Segall, is a pure blast, and might be his best record yet. Opener “Death” starts out with squealing feedback like Nirvana’s “Radio Friendly Unit Shifter” or The Vaselines’ “Son of a Gun” before tearing into a yes, very Nirvana-esque blast of heavy, melodic guitar pop. You’re just going to want to track back and listen again the second it’s over. It’s just so much fun to listen to because Segall knows just when to unleash, firing furious riffery at the very end of “I Bought My Eyes.” His keen sense of what works and what does extends past the concepts of hooks and choruses, as the minute-and-a-half screamery of the title track is one of the most memorable pieces on the album. But you’ll still be humming the weird melodies of songs like “Tell Me What’s Inside Your Heart” and “Muscle Man” because they find something fresh within seemingly well-worn territory. (The CD is out now; preorder the LP, due July 17, here.)

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AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 10:30:09

Posted by Billyjam, October 30, 2009 06:57am | Post a Comment
 World Series Game 2 Jay-Z & Alicia Keys "Empire State of Mind"

Amoeba Music Berkeley Hip-Hop Top Five: 10:30:09
sean price
1) Jay-Z Blueprint 3 (Roc Nation/Atlantic)

2) Fashawn Boy Meets World (Loud)

3) Sean Price Kimbo Price (Vision Mktg)

4) Del the Funky Homosapien & Tame One Parallel Uni-Verses (Gold Dust Media)

5) Sene & Blu A Day Late & A Dollar Short (Shaman Work)

Clearly Jay-Z is the king of the world, or at least of hip-hop right now. Not only is the phenomenally successful and popular artist number one (still) on the Amoeba Music chart with Blueprint 3, an album that came out almost two full months ago, and one that is doing equally well elsewhere, but last night Jay-Z along with Alicia Keys wowed the baseball world with a moving four minute performance of "Empire State Of Mind" (video above) during the World Series at Yankee Stadium. As a diehard, decades long fan & supporter of hip-hop music and culture from back when the genre was still being dismissed as a "passing fad," I found last night's well received performance another wonderful bit of validation and endorsement of a music form that I love and respect so much. In fact, so moving was last night's performance that it no doubt inspired the Yankees achieve their 3-1 win against the Phillies, which puts them at a tie, in this second game of the Series, which shifts to Philadelphia over the next three games, starting tomorrow, Saturday.

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Freedy Johnston's 'Perfect' Pop Gem: I'll Buy THAT for a dollar!

Posted by Mark Beaver, July 20, 2009 09:25pm | Post a Comment
freedy johnston this perfect world
Freedy Johnston
came out of Kansas and played around New York until he got signed by Bar/None Records, who released his debut, Trouble Tree in 1990. Trouble Tree was well received, but it was 1992's Can You Fly that got Johnston's name and songs bouncing all around college radio.

I've always thought of Freedy Johnston as the lost member of the Db's. He has a pristine pop quality to his voice and the stories he writes have the same almost-too-clever and slightly melancholic take on relationships that made the Db's' Amplifier the deservedly huge college rock classic that it became.

In 1994 I was working at SF's Reckless Records of London, an arguably cool and decidedly tiny record store on upper Haight St. As always, I was listening to anything I could get my hands on. Johnston's This Perfect World happened across the counter and stopped me in my tracks just by the power of its sheer completeness.

Produced by Butch Vig (Garbage) and featuring contributions from Graham Maby (Joe Jackson Band), Kevin Salem (Dumptruck), Marshall Crenshaw, Marc Ribot, Mark Spencer (Blood Oranges) and David Schramm, who worked repeatedly with the Db's' Chris Stamey and Peter Holsapple, This Perfect World is a perfect pop record. Most of it is deeply written, deeply produced and played rock-pop, though in places ("Gone Like the Water") it reveals Johnston's beloved folk-country roots. I've heard the criticism that Butch Vig sucked the edge out of it in the production, but I wasn't noticing that in 1994 and don't really notice it today, 15 years later, listening to it (still) from beginning to end.

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