Amoeblog

Tickets for Jimmy Page in Conversation with Chris Cornell Available Now at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Amoebite, October 12, 2014 02:50pm | Post a Comment

Jimmy Page book

On November 12, Jimmy Page and Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell will explore the Led Zeppelin guitarist's personal archives in a special event at the beautifully restored Theatre at the Ace Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. Titled -- appropriately enough -- An Evening with Jimmy Page in Conversation with Chris Cornell, not only will the event serve as a publication party for Page's new photographic autobiography, it's also about as close as fans will get to sitting on a cozy old threadbare sofa with Page himself, drinking tea and looking through old photos together. In fact, it'll be even better than that because eventgoers will be able to view Page's personal collection of iconic photos, unseen memorabilia, and every single one of his passports all from the comfort of the plush theatre seating of the glamourous and historic Ace Hotel. Plus, everyone who purchases a ticket to the event will receive a copy of the book Jimmy Page by Jimmy Page (Genesis Publications).

Jimmy Page by Jimmy Page is the first ever autobiography by a member of Led Zeppelin. As the official photgraphic autobiography of Mr. Page, the book contains 600 photographs chosen by the man himself to tell the story of his remarkable life.

'I've been asked on a number of occasions to do a written book and I thought of the other side of the coin. I thought it would be unique to have an autobiography in photographs.' - Jimmy Page

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Happy 70th Birthday Jimmy Page

Posted by Billyjam, January 9, 2014 01:30pm | Post a Comment

Jimmy Page BBC Interview with Kirsty Lang (2012)


James Patrick Page, the man best known as rock guitar legend and Led Zeppelin main main Jimmy Page, celebrates his 70th birthday today. And for the occasion this Amoeblog celebrates with a live concert clip and two interviews from two eras four decades apart with the man who during a BBC1 television interview in 1957 when the then only 13 year old young Page, who was on as part of a group performing "Mama Don't Want to Skiffle Anymore" and "In Them Ol' Cottonfields Back Home," told the BBC interviewer that when he grew up he wanted not be a full-time musician but "to do biological research" in finding a cure for cancer. That classic early Page clip is included in the most recent (December 2012) BBC TV interview segment with Kirsty Lang. The other (much shorter) interview is with Page along with Led Zeppelin bandmate Robert Plant from a press conference back in New York City in September 1970 during the band's heyday. Meanwhile in the live concert clip, which is of Jimmy playing "Stairway To Heaven" double neck guitar solo, he appears to have been partying a bit before the show but still manages to nail it.

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Davey Graham 1940 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, December 16, 2008 05:51pm | Post a Comment

The legendary English guitarist and a major influence on practically every fingerstyle acoustic guitarist for the past 50 years, Davey Graham, passed away on Monday of lung cancer which was detected only a few weeks ago. He was 68.

Born November 22nd, 1940 in Hinckley, Leicestershire, England, he took up the guitar at the age of 12. By the age of 19 Graham composed what would probably be his most famous piece, “Anji,” released on his debut 1962 EP, 3/4 AD, and later covered by the likes of Pentangle and Simon & Garfunkel.

Here in the United States, Graham perhaps wasn’t as well known as some of his contemporaries but he has been credited with single-handedly inventing the concept of the folk guitar instrumental in the U.K.-- simultaneous honors in the U.S would go to John Fahey, who was making similar innovations. Graham influenced a who’s who of British guitarists from Bert Jansch, John Renbourn, Richard Thompson, John Martyn, Nick Drake, Martin Carthy, and Jimmy Page -- Page’s instrumental "White Summer" was heavily based on Graham's "She Moved Thru the Bazaar/Blue Raga."

In 1959 Graham first made headlines with his attention grabbing performance of “Cry Me a River’ in the BBC television documentary Hound Dogs and Bach Addicts: The Guitar Craze, produced by Ken Russell. During the 1960s he played a major role in the British folk revival, releasing a series of eclectic solo albums that touched on a wide range of music, from jazz and blues to Indian and Arabic and gypsy. He introduced to many an aspiring young guitarist the DADGAD guitar tuning, whose chief appeal is the ability to improvise freely, yet maintain a solid underlying rhythm and harmony. But Graham's career was somewhat unpredictable; his concerts were often hit or miss. Much of his reputation was based on a couple of brilliant albums, both released in the same week of 1965, Folk Routes, New Routes in a duet with the folk singer Shirley Collins and Folk, Blues and Beyond, a mostly instrumental album that combined all his world music styles. His live playing was best captured and recorded in 1967 on an incredible album entitled After Hours, which was recorded in a student's dorm room on the campus of Hull University in front of an audience of about eight people. Nonetheless, and in many ways, even as impulsive as he may have been, Davey Graham was the first guitar hero … and certainly one of mine.

There will be a private funeral held for Davey Graham later this week. A public memorial service is being planned for January.


IN CELEBRATION OF THE DRUM: PART THREE, JOHN BONHAM

Posted by Billyjam, January 10, 2008 07:25am | Post a Comment

John Bonham of Led Zeppelin's "Moby Dicjohn bonhamk" drum solo off the 1969 album Led Zeppelin II is considered by many to be the best rock drum solo of all time The track is featured both above and below in two very different versions.

The above clip, taken from The Song Remains The Same DVD, captures the late, great artist (tragically dead at the young age of 32) at his best live -- only problem with the film clip is that it keeps cutting away to non music footage when all you want to see/hear is the drumming.

Meanwhile, below is an audio only (just one still image) YouTube clip of the song but in a completely different, raw version. It is the drum solo as it was originally recorded -- isolated from all other sounds. Reportedly recorded in May 1969 in Los Angeles, this earlier solo (only the drums for whole track) was originally titled "Pat's Delight" and the solo here, as you'll hear, is much longer than the one that later appeared as part of the Led Zep Moby Dick track.

Revisiting this drum solo now -- at a time when Led Zeppelin have surprised the world and reformed after not playing a full concert together as Led Zeppelin since Bonham died in 1980 -- makes it all thled zeppelin iie more fitting and profound, not to mention sad. One can't help but wonder what if John Bonham hadn't died so young in life? What if he were alive and able to join Robert Plant and the newly re-banded Led Zeppelin?

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