SFJAZZ Presents Merle Haggard at Oakland's Paramount Theatre, 12/4

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 1, 2015 06:37pm | Post a Comment

SFJAZZ presents Merle Haggard, Paramount Theatre

Amoeba Music is a proud sponsor of SFJAZZ's concert with country music legend Merle Haggard on Friday, December 4th at Oakland's Paramount Theatre.

GRAMMY-winning guitarist, fiddler, and vocalist Merle Haggard has enjoyed a 50-year career as a giant of American songwriting and early originator of the California-bred take on country music called “the Bakersfield Sound.” It was the honky-tonk style of Lefty Frizzell and the Western swing of Bob Wills & his Texas Playboys that first reached the young Haggard when his brother gave his battered guitar to the twelve-year-old as a gift, and it remained a constant as the troubled youth bounced from juvenile detention to jail.

An inmate at San Quentin prison in 1958, Haggard attended Johnny Cash’s first-ever prison Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, Django and Jimmieperformance, which was the inspiration for Haggard to finally clean up his act for good and embrace music as a path to turn his life around. The momentous career that followed saw Haggard inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1977 and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1994. He has recorded 38 songs that have hit #1 on the Billboard country chart, including the classics “Mama Tried,” “Okie from Muskogee,” “The Fightin’ Side of Me,” and “Pancho and Lefty” with fellow country legend Willie Nelson. His songs have been recorded by the likes of the Grateful Dead, Dean Martin, Joan Baez, and Gram Parsons, and he was named a Kennedy Center honoree in 2010.

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I'm a little bit country...

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 29, 2012 06:30pm | Post a Comment
By Kaitlin

Growing up, I was never allowed to fiddle with the radio in the car. I listened to whatever my folks were listening to and that was that. I knew kids who would get in the car and change the music, turn it up, and I was a little jealous. In retrospect, I realize that I received a huge musical education in those car trips that I wouldn’t trade for a pile of gold. Seriously!

In my dad’s car was where I first heard the Carter Family, Johnny Cash, Loretta Lynn, Patsy Cline, Tammy Wynette, Bob Wills, Jimmie Rodgers, and so on and so on. In honor of Women’s History Month, I’d like to share some of my memories about hearing these legendary, moving, and talented women.Loretta Lynn

I believe I first heard of Loretta Lynn when watching Coal Miner’s Daughter, the film based upon her life starring Sissy Spacek. She grew up dirt poor and skyrocketed to fame with an amazing voice and moving storytelling in her songs. She was a strong woman and sang about issues that real, working women dealt and still deal with such as cheating men, being a single mother, birth control, and divorce, among other themes.

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Hula Time

Posted by Sherwin Dunner, December 15, 2011 03:40pm | Post a Comment
Sometimes you never know where the next batch of 78s will be coming from and it's often from unexpected places. Recently, we were contacted by San Francisco's Market Street Railway, an advocate for San Francisco's historic streetcars which run on the Market Street Line. One of their members bequeathed his books on trolley history to them, and included in the donation were the 78s bought by his Hawaiian wife back in the 1920s. Having no use for the records, they contacted us, and we were delighted to find a strong run of records by one of the great early Hawaiian bands that recorded in the late 1920s – Kalama's Quartet. Many other obscure Hawaiian 78s were part of the collection, but by far her favorite group was Kalama's Quartet, and for good reason. Along with steel guitars, ukelele, harp guitar and bass, they featured deeply moving four part harmony singing – raw and forceful, but delicate and beautiful at the same time.

Kalama's QuartetThe collectors of early Hawaiian 78s are mostly drawn to the steel guitar giants Sol Hoopii, King Benny Nawahi, and the rare as hen's teeth discs by Madame Riviera's Hawaiians featuring Tau Moe. In addtion to the traditional vocals, Kalama's Quartet features twin steel guitars, playing lead and harmony – more bang for your steel guitar buck, plus the exquisite Hawaiian falsetto singing of Mike Hanapi. Along with Hanapi (front) singing tenor and falsetto, their core personnel included the deep resonant bass voice of Bob Nawahini (left), the baritone of Dave Munson or Dan Pokipala (right) and the lead voice of Bill Kalama (behind Hanapi). They didn't bother to change their name to Quintet when somewhere along the way Bob Matsu was added as a second steel guitar.

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(In which Job hocks some shiny spit.)

Posted by Job O Brother, April 1, 2008 12:31pm | Post a Comment

I don’t have much time this week; I’m nipple-deep in spring cleaning. I won’t sleep until this apartment shines like the top of the Chrysler Building.

As with everything I do – from cleaning, to cooking, to not doing math homework, to faking my way through a treatment of complicated parapneumonic effusion and pleural empyema by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery – I do it with music.

Here then, are some of my favorite things to hear when I’m wielding a Swiffer or yanking my Toilet Duck:

While I was polishing my silver bullet collection, I couldn't help but notice that my fellow Amoeblogger, Billyjam, posted an interview with me, which you can read by pressing the word "perambulator" in this sentence. It's really too kind. My only complaint is that he neglected to include the scratch 'n' sniff portions.