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Music History Monday: June 4

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 4, 2012 04:50pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com

On this day in music history: June 4, 1942 - Capitol Records is established in Hollywood. Founded byCapitol Records songwriting legend Johnny Mercer ("You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby," "Autumn Leaves," "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)," "Hooray for Hollywood"), songwriter/film producer Buddy De Sylva, and music store owner Glenn Wallichs (Wallichs Music City), Mercer will propose the idea of starting a record label the year before to his friend Wallichs. A few months later, Mercer will propose the same idea to De Sylva who is an executive producer at Paramount Pictures. With the third partner aboard, the three get to work organizing their first releases and opening their first offices in a building south of Sunset Blvd. By July 1st, the label will release its first nine singles. The label will innovate new techniques in promoting the sales of records, including being the first to distribute free records to disc jockeys for promotional purposes. Capitol will quickly build up an impressive roster of artists that includes Les Baxter, Les Paul, Peggy Lee, Stan Kenton, Les Brown, and Nat King Cole. Over the years, that list of artists will grow to also include Frank Sinatra, Stan Kenton, Judy Garland, Stan Freberg, Gene Vincent, Dean Martin, The Four Freshmen, Al Martino, The Kingston Trio, Nancy Wilson, The Beach Boys, The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Linda Ronstadt, The Band, Steve Miller Band, Bob Seger, Natalie Cole, Tina Turner, George Clinton, Duran Duran, David Bowie, Queen, Heart, MC Hammer, Garth Brooks, Radiohead, Coldplay, Foo Fighters, and Katy Perry. Happy 70th Anniversary, Capitol Records!!!
 
On this day in music history: June 4, 1962 - The single "Surfin' Safari" by The Beach Boys is released. Written by Brian Wilson and Mike Love, it is the bands' debut release on Capitol Records. The released single is actually the second version of the song recorded, with the band previously cutting a version with engineer Hite Morgan at World Pacific Studios on February 8, 1962. The first recording also features guitarist Al Jardine who is replaced shortly afterward by David Marks (when Jardine drops out of the band for a year), and is not released until January of 1970. The second (and released) version is recorded at United/Western Recorders in Hollywood on April 19th with band manager and Wilson brothers father Murry Wilson credited as producer. Also recorded on the same session is the B-side "409," which will also chart (#76 Pop). "Surfin' Safari" will peak at #14 on the Billboard Hot 100 on October 13, 1962.



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The Art Of The LP Cover- Bandits, Outlaws & Gangsters

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, February 5, 2012 11:45pm | Post a Comment

The Art of the LP Cover- Wicker Men And Women, Pt. 2

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, November 27, 2011 05:40pm | Post a Comment

Check out last year's gallery for more wickery, click here.

The Track That Built Hip-Hop: James Brown Band's Clyde Stubblefield's Funky Drummer

Posted by Billyjam, June 14, 2010 01:45pm | Post a Comment

The PBS documentary that aired earlier this year, Copyright Criminals, was all about sampling in hip-hop and other contemporary music forms. There was a wonderful segment in which they focused on James Brown's drummer Clyde Stubblefield, who got little or no credit for one of his most influential & sampled pieces. The Chattanooga, Tennessee- born funk drummer was a member of James Brown's band during some of the most exciting years and, as such, he was responsible for the drumming on such classic Brown recordings as "Cold Sweat," "Say It Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud," "There Was A Time," "I Got The Feelin'," "Mother Popcorn," and "Ain't It Funky Now."

But it was Stubblefield's simple but funky and hypnotic drum pattern on the James Brown track "Funky Drummer" that would become the artist's greatest legacy, even though he didn't initially get the full credit for it. The song, which would go on to become the most sampled tracks in hip-hop music, was widely utilized by artists in the late 80's and early 90's (and beyond, too) who, generally speaking, did not give proper credit to the song's creators. In the documentary Stubblefield talks about the disappointment he felt for not getting credited for his work so many times. In fact  even when the "Funky Drummer" was credited, it was typically James Brown who was given credit for the original, not Stubblefield. But as time goes on, more and more people know who the "funky drummer" is and give the man his props.


"Funky Drummer"

Artists that have sampled "Funky Drummer" include Public Enemy, DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, Ultramagnetic MCs, Beastie Boys, De La Soul, Gang Starr, Geto Boys, NWA, Eric B & Rakim, Ice Cube, The Pharcyde, Run DMC, Above The Law, and Biz Markie.

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Remembering Tammi Terrell, Who Died 40 Years Ago Today

Posted by Whitmore, March 16, 2010 08:11pm | Post a Comment
Tammi Terrell
40 years ago today
, Thomasina Winifred Montgomery, better known as Tammi Terrell, died of a brain tumor just a month short of her 25th birthday. She was one of that incredible crop of 1960’s soul diva’s who knew how to seduce or belt out a song. Today she is best remembered for her Motown duets with Marvin Gaye with singles like “Ain't No Mountain High Enough”, “Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing”, “Your Precious Love” and “You're All I Need to Get By.”
 
Born in Philadelphia in 1945, as a teenager Tammi Terrell recorded for the Scepter/Wand label, releasing two solo discs under the name Tammy Montgomery. Both singles released in 1961, “If You See Bill,” and “Voice of Experience,” failed to chart. At about the same time, she also did session work doing backup vocals for the legendary Shirelles. In 1963 she was discovered by James Brown and joined his Revue. While under contract with Brown, Tammi released one single on his Try Me label, “I Cried.” At the time it was rumored that Terrell and Brown were romantically involved, Tammi Terrellsomething that didn’t quite fly with her parents, leading to her quick departure; she was replaced by Anna King. Next she signed with Checker Records' label, releasing one single, “If I Would Marry You.” Unfortunately her string of unsuccessful releases continued. In 1965 she signed with Motown, Barry Gordy changed her name to Tammi Terrell, and there she finally scored a couple of Top 30 singles on the R&B charts with 1966’s "I Can't Believe You Love Me" and "Come on and See Me." But it was when she was paired up with Marvin Gaye in 1967 that success finally came, fast and furious, with five top three R&B charting singles in just over a year. But all her success was short lived. On October 14, 1967, while in concert at Ogden Hall at the Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia, she collapsed on stage in Gaye's arms. She was rushed to the hospital, where she was later diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. She had complained of severe migraine headaches for some time.
 Tammi Terrell
For years now stories have circulated that Tammi was the victim of a physically abusive boyfriend who had not only thrown her down a flight of stairs, but had also hit her over the head with a steel chair. But no actual allegations were ever proved. Terrell would undergo eight separate operations over the next three years for cancer; suffering from memory loss, numbness and weakness, blindness, she become far too sick to work. Eventually she was confined to a wheelchair and her weight dropped to under 85 lbs.
 
Tammi Terrell died on March 16th, 1970. She’s buried in Mount Lawn Cemetery in Philadelphia.
 
Marvin Gaye was devastated by her death. He took a long hiatus from live performances. And in his period of self-isolation, amidst his depression he re-evaluated his whole concept of what music might say. The result was the classic 1971 album What's Going On, a meditative, low key work which dealt, in part, with Tammi Terrell's death and issues of the world around him -- injustice, suffering and hatred.



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