Amoeblog

Contemporary Irish Hip-Hop

Posted by Billyjam, September 21, 2013 07:03pm | Post a Comment
      
                    Rob Kelly "Jack The Ripper" (2013)

Since its humble beginnings in the 1980's Irish hip-hop has gradually grown and developed to its current vibrant state.  From starting out as a predominantly derivative genre hip-hop in Emerald Isle has, over the years, clearly found its own voice and distinctive style. And while this identity first took root in the 90's, with acts like Scary Eire showcasing a unique Irish take on the genre, it is really only in the past five or six years that Irish hip-hop has become a most distinctive sub-genre of the global hip-hop movement with more artists than any previous time in its short history contributing to the art form.

As an Irish born hip-hop fan, who left the country just as hip-hop was taking root there, upon each return visit I have been actively following hip-hop in Ireland and can report that it is currently enjoying its healthiest & most innovative state with a slew of excellent new songs and albums been released over the past twelve month period alone - many from artists who just arrived on the scene in the past half decade. Over the past few decades it has been interesting to watch this Irish strain of the American born musical genre go through its slow but steady development. For this Amoeblog I have selected a brief sampling of Irish hip-hop videos from the past year or so to give an overview of the scene over there.

Continue reading...

St. Patrick's Day Spotlight on Irish Hip-Hop & Rap Music

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2012 11:31am | Post a Comment

Sons Phonetic "Isolation (feat RíRá)"


Rob Kelly "Crazy"


Street Literature "Products of the Environment"


Lunitic "Stacy's Story"


Class A'z "Who Shot Ya"

In honor of St Patrick's Day today I have included a little sampling of Irish hip-hop (focusing on rap) care of the above videos that include Wexford's Rob Kelly with the song "Crazy." and the Waterford based hip-hop crew Sons Phonetic from their album Twelve Labours and featuring a cameo from Ireland's greatest emcee in its hip-hop history spanning past few decades - RíRá who in the years since his role in the pioneering Irish hip-hop group Scary Eire has built a strong solo career that includes collaborating with countless up-and-coming Irish hip-hop acts like Sons Phonetic, and the late great Dublin rapper Lunitic from his album Based on a True Story on the song "Celtic Funk."   Above is the video for another song off that same Lunitic album. It is for the song "Stacy's Story."Also above is the video from about 3 years ago for "Who Shot Ya" by Dublin super-rap group Class A'z featuring Nucentz, Redzer, Terawrizt, and Rawsoul.

Continue reading...

E40's Revenue Retrievin', Ice Cube's Raiders Movie, DonWill's Don Cusack in High Fidelity, Irish Hip-Hop Fests, Free Downloads and More: Amoeba Music Weekly Hip-Hop Round Up: 04:02:10

Posted by Billyjam, April 2, 2010 07:25am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music San Francisco Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 04:02:10


1) E40 Revenue Retrievin'- Day Shift (Heavy on the Grind Ent.)

2) E40 Revenue Retrievin'- Night Shift (Heavy on the Grind Ent.)

3) Madlib Medicine Show 3-Beat Konducta in Africa (Stones Throw)

4) Meth, Ghost & Rae Wu Massacre (Def Jam)

5) DonWill Don Cusack in High Fidelity (Interdependent Media)

In both the number 1 and 2 chart positions this week on the San Francisco Amoeba Music Hip-Hop Chart is longtime Bay Area rap artist E-40 with the his simultaneously released pair of CDs titled Revenue Retrievin' Day Shift  and Revenue Retrievin' Night Shift. Released this past Tuesday, both the Day Shift and Night Shift parts shot to the top of the chart partly in response to the well received lead off single/video "The Weed Man (feat. Stressmatic)" (see video below). Other guests who join the pioneering, "slanguage" making Vallejo wordsmith on the new two part CD series include such known names as Snoop Dogg, Too Short,  Mistah F.A.B., Ya Boy, Laroo, Dru Down, The DBz, Turf Talk, The Jacka, E40 MVPGucci Mane, B-Legit, Mike Marshall, Suga T, J. Valentine, Droop-E, Mac Shawn and Clyde Carson & Husalah of Mob Figaz, who appear together on the song ""Lightweight Jammin'" which is on the Day Shift volume of the two CDs. As usual, Forty Water keeps it true to the Bay with all of those local artists joining him throughout the two CDs, which total up 38 new tracks --19 on each CD.

Continue reading...

Irish Hip-Hop Overview

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2010 10:28pm | Post a Comment
Rob Kelly
Like many countries outside of the birthplace of hip-hop, the true beginnings of Irish hip-hop took hold a decade + after its birth Stateside. Today the European country boasts a healthy, albeit still somewhat underground, hip-hop scene with many talented MCs, DJs, b-boys, and graffiti artists.

In the latter half of the eighties several Irish artists embraced hip-hop, including Sinead O'Conner, who teamed up in 1988 with MC Lyte on the single remix of the track "I Want Your (Hands On Me)." Some years later in the early 1990's O'Conner would collaborate with the political UK based group Marxman, which included two Irish born members, on the song "Ship Ahoy." There were also many scratch DJs (including DJ Mek) and b-boys starting out in the late 80's, a time when hip-hop began to make inroads on Irish music.

Many longtime Irish hip-hop heads cite the late eighties and specifically the occasions when Schoolly D and Public Enemy each played gigs in the Irish capital as pivotal moments in hip-hop taking hold in the Emerald Isle -- kind of like how those in the UK a decade earlier went to see the Sex Pistols in concert and were so directly influenced that they then went out and formed their own punk groups. "That Public Enemy concert at McGonagles changed my life," old school Dublin hip-hop diehard Laz-E, a DJ and former b-boy, told me, adding that many others at that same 1988 PE concert were directly influenced, especially by Chuck D and company. But it took a few years before a real hip-hop scene with a distinctive Irish flavor while also staying true to hip-hop's Bronx roots would properly eScary Eiremerge in Ireland.