Amoeblog

Jon Moritsugu Retrospective in Downtown Los Angeles plus his latest film, Pig Death Machine

Posted by Eric Brightwell, August 12, 2013 11:28am | Post a Comment
Pig Death Machine posterJon Moritsugu (click here to read an Amoebog interview) and Amy Davis's latest film, Pig Death Machine, is playing in Downtown Los Angeles for one week (9 August till 15 August).


For those that aren't familiar with him, Jon Moritsugu is an auteur in the proper sense of the word. From 1986's Mommy Mommy Where's My Brain till  to his latest, all films have all reflected a distinct, personal creative vision. He has his own section in Cult Cinema on the mezzanine of Amoeba Hollywood.


Here's a trailer and plot summary of his latest:


"Starring Davis as a nerdy, yet doornail-dumb hottie who eats undercooked, paraside-laden, pink piggy and is transformed into a dangerous genius, while across town, a punky-buxom-botanist eats the same meaty treat and ends up endowed with the supernatural ability to 'hear' her specimens."




"A sci-fi/psych-horror/screwball ride of chaotic, day-glo fever dreams and glitter-dusted nightmares, shot in the stunning wilds of New Mexico and featuring the music of Deerhoof, Dirty Beaches, Polvo, and industrial legend Monte Cazazza (Throbbing Gristle)."

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Asian-American Cinema Part VI - the 2000s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 27, 2009 04:00pm | Post a Comment
INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN-AMERICAN CINEMA

The first efforts to combat negative racial stereotypes of Asians and Asian-Americans in film began in the silent era, when a few empowered figures attempted to create an alternative Asian-American Silent Cinema. After their efforts faltered, Hollywood provided most cinematic images of Asians in the '30s, 40s, 50s, and '60s. With the birth of Asian-American theater, Asian-American cinema was revived in the 1970s and began to take off as a viable independent cinema in the 1980s. By the '90s, the scope of Asian-American Cinema broadened considerably, a trend that continued in the 2000s.

APAMERICA IN THE 2000s
In the 2000s, Asians became the fastest growing racial minority in the county. As of 2006, there were over thirteen million Americans of Asian descent (not counting Native people). Of the top ten languages spoken in American homes (English, Spanish, Chinese, French, German, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Korean, Italian and Russian), four are Asian.

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Asian-American Cinema Part V - the 1990s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 26, 2009 11:55am | Post a Comment

INTRO TO ASIAN-AMERICAN CINEMA

In the silent film era, a few Asian-Americans braved decidedly limited opportunities and even attempted to create a cinematic outlet for their voices. By the dawn of the sound era, Asian-American cinema disappeared and Hollywood once again controlled depictions and roles. In the post-war era, roles for Asian-American actors grew in number, if not diversity. As a result, Asian-American theater arose to fill the void, ultimately leading to the rebirth of an authentic Asian-American Cinema that grew slowly over the next two decades before expanding rapidly in the '90s and continuing in the 2000s.

APA DEMOGRAPHIC MILESTONES IN THE '90s

The 1990s were a time of tremendous growth in the Asian-American population, resulting in a notable demographic milestone when Monterey Park became the first Asian-American majority city on the US mainland. It was soon followed by several others, including Cerritos, Cupertino, Daly City, Milpitas and Rowland Heights in California as well as Millbourne in Pennsylvania.

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Asian-American Cinema Part IV - Asian-American Cinema - 1970s and 1980s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 25, 2009 04:16pm | Post a Comment
ASIAN-AMERICAN CINEMA

After short-lived attempts in the silent era to establish an Asian-American Cinema, for most of the in the first and second halves of the studio era, Hollywood single-handedly created and controlled almost all celluloid images of Asian-Americans. With the beginnings of Asian-American theater in the 1960s and its growth in the 1970s coinciding with the decline of the Hollywood studio system, all that began to change with the rebirth of Asia-American Cinema, albeit slowly at first. Only in the 1990s and 2000s has a large and diverse Asian-American cinema, Asian-American theater and Asian-American comedy scene truly flourished -- offering a viable alternative to Hollywood's continued stereotypes and ongoing homogeneity.

Orphaned Cambodian Children Vietnamese Boat People

THE CHANGING FACE OF ASIAN-AMERICA IN THE '70S

In the 1970s, more than 130,000 refugees arrived from Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, drastically changing the make-up of the Asian-American population. Broadly speaking, this wave of immigrants had more in common socio-economically speaking with most blacks, Latinos and Natives; therein challenging the mid '60s-born concept of Asians as "the model minority."

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Asian-American Cinema Part III - Asian-Americans in Hollywood - The 1950s & 1960s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 24, 2009 04:58pm | Post a Comment
Before the dominance of Hollywood, most Asian-American actors roles were limited to the background and in offensive roles. Two APA actors, Anna May Wong and Sessue Hayakawa, nonetheless became superstars. They and a few other pioneers attempted to produce a genuinely Asian-American Cinema in the silent era.

By the dawn of
the studio era, Hollywood was the dominant voice in American film and Asian-American actors were once again limited to stereotypical roles, often in supporting roles for white actors in yellowface. Largely due to the influence of Asian-American theater and the efforts of those APA players involved, an authentic Asian-American Cinema was reborn in the '70s and '80s, ultimately expanding and diversifying in the 1990s and 2000s.