One Album Wonders: Mad Season

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 2, 2015 02:31pm | Post a Comment
Mad Season

The Scientists were likely both grunge's inventors and the genre's first supergroup (members had previously played in Cheap Nasties, Slick City Boys, and Victims). However, if one hears “grunge supergroup” they more likely think of Temple of the Dog, a one album wonder the members of which had previously played in Seattle grunge bands including Soundgarden, Green River, and Skin Yard (as well as the not-really-grunge one album wonders Mother Love Bone and not-at-all Seattle - since they were from San Diego - Bad Radio). Mad Season, when they're remembered, are that other grunge supergroup. 
Mad Season's Above

Mad Season arrived pretty late on the scene, toward the end of 1994. In April of that year, Kurt Cobain had killed himself but alternative and music had by then long ceased to be anything remotely underground and was resolutely mainstream. In 1992, MTV had replaced 120 Minutes host Dave Kendall with, Lewis Largent and the program, which had previously showcased a host of bands playing diverse music became a parade of bands whose members dressed like Largent, in shorts, combat boots, flannel, and backwards baseball cap. If that wasn't mainstream enough, MTV also launched the ironically named Alternative Nation as a showcase for the manufactured corporate guitar rock favored by soulful dudebros (eg Candlebox and Stone Temple Pilots).

In 1993 Marc Jacobs had served up grunge realness on the catwalk for Perry Ellis -- five years after Martin Margiela had pretty much done the same thing, serving up a fantasy of homeless fashion for the one percent. By 1994 pre-ripped jeans and combat boots were part of a uniform adopted by the knavescene and celebrities like Brad Pitt, Johnny Depp, and Keanu Reeves. Their female counterparts, such as emaciated supermodel Kate Moss,  were used to promote heroin chic. After not having heard any interesting new American rock in what seemed like forever, I gave up on it. I would hear the names of new bands, including Toadies, Seven Mary Three, Sky Cries Mary, Jars of Clay, Primitive Radio Gods, Eels, DC Talk, Duncan Sheik, Sister Hazel, Local H, and more. All would have their champions but like every Steven Spielberg movie since Raiders of the Lost Ark, if I gave any a chance I'd almost certainly be underwhelmed. 

Mudhoney Doc "I’m Now" Premieres in San Francisco August 4th at The Vogue Theatre

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 18, 2012 04:20pm | Post a Comment
Head on out to The Vogue Theatre on August 4th for the San Francisco premier of I’m Now, a documentaryI'm Now Mudhoney about the seminal band Mudhoney, directed/edited/produced by Ryan Short and Adam Pease. 

Today Mudhoney stands as one of the only survivors of a musical movement that inspired a generation and changed Rock and Roll forever. The band’s seminal hit “Touch Me I’m Sick” is on the short list of songs that define Grunge, the early ‘90s rock renaissance and, let’s face it, is one of the best rock songs ever, regardless of genre niche or time period. Mudhoney’s music and attitude have inspired countless artists and continue to do so today.

This documentary tells the story of Mudhoney from their very beginnings, to following them on their recent world tour and everything in between. Complete with testimonials from friends, music industry veterans, and musicians such as Pearl Jam’s Stone Gossard and Jeff Ament, Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore and Kim Gordon, Soundgarden’s Kim Thayil, and Mudhoney themselves, this movie shows the true story of the founding fathers of Grunge (please do not describe Mudhoney as the founding fathers of Grunge).

Get your tickets HERE!
Follow @AmoebaSF on Twitter for a chance to win tickets to see I'm Now!

(In which we consider Vince Clarke.)

Posted by Job O Brother, July 22, 2008 10:49am | Post a Comment
Vince Clarke
Vince Clarke, worshiping in his own way.

Oh! Something I meant to tell you: The other day I was talking on the phone to Vince Clarke about Yazoo (or Yaz, for those few of you who live in the quaint li’l province of The United States of America). He’s on tour right now with the indomitable Alison Moyet. For those of us who discovered the two, flawless Yaz albums in youth and remained loyal to the duo long after they weren’t to each other, this reunion tour is nothing short of a miracle.

Corey and I saw them perform recently and I’m telling you now, kids – find out when they’re playing near you, buy your tickets fast and GO! I can’t remember the last time I enjoyed a concert more.

Because I signed away all legal rights (I wasn’t using them anyhow) I can’t post my chat with Mr. Clarke on the Amoeblog, but you can read it by clicking on the sentence below:

This sentence serves no purpose other than providing a convenient link upon which you may click with your (rather dirty and in need of cleaning) mouse.

In other news, a bunch of we Amoebites went to the Hollywood Bowl Sunday night to see Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings and Feist, but I’m not going to report on it until Logan sends me the [insert cuss word here] pictures.

So, what does this blog entry have to offer you besides promises of reports elsewhere available?


Posted by Billyjam, January 29, 2008 08:00am | Post a Comment

They may never have made as big a splash commercially as some of the other "grunge" (a genre they pioneered) acts out of the Great North West, but Tad (named after band leader & ex-butcher Tad Doyle), who formed in 1988, sure made their mark in other lasting ways.

They were banned by MTV, sued by Pepsi, dropped by their label and got into heavy drinking and drugging, not to mention heavy situations, it seemed, wherever they went-- including landing in legal trouble over the found picture of a couple that they utilized (without permission) as an album cover.

Now finally there is a film about the long-defunct band Tad.  Titled Busted Circuits and Ringing Ears and made by Ryan Short and Adam Pease for King of Hearts Productions, it's planned for release on DVD on February 19th. Check out the clip above and visit the film makers' MySpace for more info on this documentary which looks like it will be pretty damn good.

Exactly twenty years ago, in early '88, Tad was formed by singer/guitarist Tad Doyle and bassist Kurt Danielson who recruited both Gary Thorstensen as guitarist and Steve Wied (formerly of Skin Yard) as their drummer. That was the original lineup and the band signed to the then new label Sub Pop, who released their debut album God's Balls in early 1989. The album track "Wood Goblins" was released as a single and video but was reportedly banned by MTV over content (scroll down to see the video).

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