Amoeblog

Jill Tracy Performs Original Score for Nosferatu at SF's Presidio Officers' Club, 2/18

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, February 7, 2016 05:51pm | Post a Comment

Jill Tracy's Nosferatu

San Francisco-based singer, pianist, storyteller, and one-time featured Amoeba Music Homegrown Artist Jill Tracy at Amoeba San Francisco, 2010Jill Tracy brings her mesmerizing score for F.W. Murnau's silent German Expressionist classic Nosferatu, A Symphony of Horrors back to San Francisco with a live performance at the Presidio Officers' Club on February 18th. As part of the venue's Presidio Dialogues series, Jill Tracy will perform the score live with The Malcontent Orchestra during the screening of the haunting 1922 vampire masterpiece, preceded by a short musical set.

Murnau’s Nosferatu was the first screen adaptation of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula, but it was unfortunately also unauthorized. The Stoker estate sued for copyright infringement and won, thus ordering for the incineration of all existing prints. Luckily for film history and fans of vampires everywhere, a few copies had already been distributed worldwide.

There is no other composer and performer better suited to musically evoke the eerie sensuality of Nosferatu than Jill Tracy. This event is one night only, FREE, and seats are limited, so make your reservations now HERE!

We just tell it how we see it, nothing more, nothing less -- Neue Sachlichkeit in film

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 26, 2014 06:12am | Post a Comment
Albert Renger-Patzsch, Hochofenwerk Herrenwyk, Lübeck, 1928
Albert Renger-Patzsch's Hochofenwerk Herrenwyk, Lübeck (1928)


Germany
's interwar Weimar Republic may've existed amidst political chaos but it was an incredibly fertile time for the arts. German Expressionism, although it first developed around 1900, only flowered on the screen during the interwar period. Emerging Fascists enjoyed the themes of  Arnold Fanck and Leni Riefenstahl's Mountain Movies. Less well-remembered today was the New Objectivity, an movements whose chief practitioner in film was G.W. Pabst, whose debut film, Der Schatz (The Treasure - 1923), opened in theaters on today (26 February) in 1923.

August Sander The Architect Hans Heinz Luttgen and his Wife Dora 1926
August Sander's The Architect Hans Heinz Luttgen and his Wife Dora (1926)

German Expressionism, the best known cinematic expression of the culture and era, first arose in poetry and painting but ultimately made its way to the screen, exemplified by excellent and still widely-enjoyed films like Der Student von Prag (The Student of Prague), Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari (The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari), Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam (The Golem), Der müde Tod (Destiny), Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (Nosferatu), Schatten, Eine nächtliche Halluzination (Warning Shadows), and Der letzte Mann (The Last Laugh). The Mountain Movies, or Bergfilm, are generally viewed less seriously as art and are undoubtedly interesting to modern audiences primarily for their fascist themes and frequent involvement of Leni Riefenstahl.

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[Insert wordless visual here.]

Posted by Job O Brother, March 30, 2009 03:55pm | Post a Comment
silent film

Not to lure you away from the safe and nurturing environment that is the Amoeblog, but, for those of you interested in reading it with your eyes, here is a link to a recent interview I had with one of my favorites, Marianne Faithfull.

Now then, on to a topic that is not oft spoke of; that is, silent films. Amoeba Music Hollywood has a small but rich silent film section which, at this writing, is located on the mezzanine. I’m taking this opportunity to advocate a greater appreciation and exploration of this antiquated genre.

For many people, silent films are a known but ignored craft, as though the technological progress that married sound to film rendered the silent precursors an inferior product. While I do hail “talkies” as a wonderful invention, I still feel there is much joy to be had in silent cinema. If nothing else, knowing a bit about it can be enough to get you laid by art-school chicks taking a break from experimenting with bisexuality.

louise brooks

The first silent I saw that rocked me was the tragic drama Pandora’s Box [original, German title: Die Büchse der Pandora]. Released in 1929 and directed by Austrian Georg Wilhelm Pabst, it stars the gorgeous and gifted Louise Brooks in the lead role.


Another gem I treasure is Wings, the first film to win an Academy Award for Best Picture (and the only silent film to do so). Released in 1927 and directed by William A. Wellman, it stars Clara Bow, the quintessential flapper icon, and has a cameo by not-yet-superstar Gary Cooper.

The TRON Aesthetic: The Atari Age of German Expressionism

Posted by Charles Reece, October 25, 2008 01:38pm | Post a Comment
The magnificent scenes of heroism, transcendence and man dominating his surroundings should please the most masculinist among us, including Ayn Rand and Leni Riefenstahl:

Jeff Bridges Flynn Tron
Bruce Boxleitner Tron
Jeff Bridges Flynn Clu Tron
Bruce Boxleitner Tron
Tron battle Jeff Bridges Clu

The close-ups all have that overly melodramatic silent-era quality to them. Note the way Flynn (Jeff Bridges) has Valentino eyes and Sark (David Warner) looks like a Conrad Veidt villain:

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