Amoeblog

Pride Weekend Starts Early In The San Francisco Bay Area Including Mykki Blanco Concert Tonight

Posted by Billyjam, June 27, 2013 12:15pm | Post a Comment

Mykki Blanco "Wavvy" (2012)

The big San Francisco Pride Parade 2013 may still be a few days away - Sunday, June 30th - but in the San Francisco Bay Area - similarly to other major metropolitan areas like New York City - the Pride celebrations are all weekend long with the Pride Weekend kicking into gear Thursday, today June 27th, with a bunch of parties and events including the Flamboyant Specimens at the Project Lab, Faetopia - the Pop-Up Queer Arts Festival at Noe and Market in the old Tower Records space, plus the talented rapper Mykki Blanco (pic left, video above) at the Mezzanine in San Francisco all happening later today. In fact Bay Area Pride 2013 celebrations began last night (Wednesday) in Oakland's Uptown district where Telegraph Ave near 19th was blocked off to traffic for the Hella Oakland Street Party: Gay Marriage Rally & Celebration - organized by the promoters of the long running, popular, (and ingeniously titled) Hella Gay Oakland party at the Uptown club in that same block. Note that the same proud promoters of the award winning "Oakland queer dance party" will be throwing their big Hella Gay party at the Uptown on Saturday which they are billing as "Beat the BART" and the "Dyke March Afterparty."

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Music Videos of Ten Gay Club/Dance Classics

Posted by Billyjam, June 30, 2012 10:29pm | Post a Comment

As this year's LGBT Pride Month comes to a close here is one last installment in the series of Amoeblog specials celebrating the occasion It is ten music videos of gay disco/dancefloor favorites culled mostly from the 70's & 80's / disco/new wave eras (some 90's too) - and compiled from various lists and playlists drawn up by music fans and DJs.

Naturally it only scratches the surface and doesn't include a ton of great songs/videos. So feel free to post in comments any ones you think that should be added. But it does have some classic gay dancefloor staples in there including such ever popular ones such as the Village People's "In The Navy" and the Pet Shop Boys' later decade single/video cover of the Village People's "Go West."

Also included is Diana Ross' 1980 hit single "I'm Coming Out" which song producer Nile Rodgers reportedly got the idea for the track after noticing at some discos drag queens dressing like Ross. Of course the song, which was a disco and mainstream radio hit, was perceived on different levels by different people. For Ross herself it was her signature concert entrance opening theme as in the video below from her 1981 Great Western LA Forum show (note the clip also includes her doing "The Boss").

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The Roots of the Irish Disco/Dance Club Scene

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2011 06:10pm | Post a Comment
Paul Tarpey (Cheebah crew, Limerick, Ireland)
In keeping with the theme of Saint Patrick's Day for today's Amoeblog, I invited my good old friend, fellow Irishman and longtime fan of hip-hop and electronic music Paul Tarpey to be a guest Amoeblogger. For this post Paul, who is a Limerick-based DJ, photographer, & writer from that Irish city's Cheebah crew (who throw amazing parties and run the Cheebah and All That website), has sketched out a history of the Irish dance music club scene. Nowadays dance / electronic music and clubs are an integral part of the Irish music landscape. But it wasn't always that way; on the contrary. Long resistant to both hip-hop and electronic dance music, the homeland of U2 and countless other rock bands was for the longest time supportive of rock to the point of being discriminatory against disco and later dance/beat driven genres, something the guest Amoeblogger calls "rockist."

Tarpey said he felt compelled to research and write this piece when he "realised that the period before 1993 was overshadowed by the rockist history of the Irish music scene and that these early days merit some sort of record before memories fade and we forget about that scene’s pioneering activities." Here is what the Irish hip-hop/electronic music historian had to say:

Assemble any metropolitan club history, from the Paradise Garage in New York to The Hacienda in Manchester, and the same details are arrived at: innovative DJs within a specialised environment create their own rules to soundtrack a communal experience while being spurred on by a dedicated crowd. These classic night spots build slowly and peak after a few influential years, leaving behind them reputations and energy flashed memories. The Irish files to be dusted off from this period contain sections marked Flikkers and Sides. In remembering the history of these Dublin dance clubs, we consider the roots of an Irish dance movement that is as important in its own place as those overseas mythical dance palaces with their own associated cultural legacies.

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Acceptance of Gays in 2010: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back? Despite More Inclusion of Gays in the Media, Violence Against Gays Escalates

Posted by Billyjam, October 5, 2010 04:00pm | Post a Comment
The Stonewall Inn
On the surface it seems totally contradictory that within the span of the very same week GLAAD announced visibility of gays is at an all time high for the new 2010 / 2011 television season, that news of some of the most heinous attacks on the LGBT community also surfaced. These include the cyber attack on 18 year old Rutgers University student Tyler Clementi, who committed suicide after being humiliated by his roommate taping/streaming him online having sex with another man. They also include the gay bashing of three men in Chelsea, NY's predominantly gay neighborhood, over the weekend, and the even more shocking brutal gay-bashing attack on 34 year old Benjamin Carver on Sunday night inside the bathroom of Greenwich Village, NY bar The Stonewall Inn (yes the Stonewall, as in the birthplace of the gay rights movement) by two violent homophobic Staten Island men. Add to this list numerous other hate attacks on gays across the nation (whether violent, verbal, or cyber) in recent weeks and months and you begin to wonder if we are regressing or progressing as a society.

If the LGBT community is more visible than ever (and hence supposedly more accepted), why the seeming increase in hate crimes? Is there possibly a backlash to this increased exposure, seen as Michael Mustooverexposure by some, of gays in the media? Do such things as the billboards in every New York City subway station and other major metropolitan TV markets advertising Logo TV's new gay reality show The A List trigger repressed hatred in some? Earlier today via email I asked noted author/journalist/TV personality and longtime La Dolce Musto columnist Michael Musto (described by the NY Times as a journalist "who has chronicled the lives of drag queens, club kids, and an array of freaks and celebrities for The Village Voice for 25 years") if he thought there was a direct correlation between the results of this study and the recent attacks on gays. "I feel that every time there is forward motion on the part of the gay community, there's some backlash from the haters," replied Musto. "They get extra panicky and desperately try to seize control back. So it's quite possible that the upsurge in gay characters on TV (and gay visibility everywhere) has had something to do with the recent incidents."

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A Single Man - Definitely Singular

Posted by Miss Ess, December 30, 2009 04:22pm | Post a Comment
In many ways, it seems like a bad idea for someone who is a fashion designer to make a film, doesn't it? It seems so egotistical, so over the top, for someone with great success in one highly visible industry to attempt it in another. Sure, occasionally it works out, but for the most part, we've seen enough celebrities try their hands at creative endeavors in genres other than the one they've become popular in to great failure. Bruce Willis, anyone? Mariah Carey? Russell Crowe? Ethan Hawke?

But Tom Ford has, against the odds, done it well. A Single Man, his first feature film, is out now and it is fantastic.

a single man

See, for all the reasons that making a film when you are a highly accomplished fashion designer sounds a single man colin firthlike a potential disaster, there are other reasons that make sense if (big if) it is done right; after all, both film and fashion are visual mediums. And Tom Ford proves yet again that he has a gifted eye by beautifully and movingly capturing the anguish and lasting sorrow of an English professor living in Los Angeles in 1962. After about a year, George Falconer (played by Colin Firth) still can't get over the sudden death of his long term lover. Ford brings precision and artistry to the film, taking the viewer directly into the George's world, showing us how slowly time ticks by, how he feels like he is drowning, his total isolation and all-consuming grief. His world has literally faded to grey and we see its colors through his eyes. There are moments of brightness, but mostly it is dulled.

The film also portrays the suffocating feeling of being forced to stay clojulianne moore a single manseted in the early 60s. Julianne Moore is perfection as Charley, George's desperate, gilded best (only?) friend. Aside from Charley, George is kept from connecting to the vast majority of the world even if he wanted to, simply by his status as a gay man in an unaccepting society. This, along with his unspeakable sorrow, causes him to feel disconnected from pretty much everything and everyone, but the events of the single day in which the film takes place try to show him otherwise.
chris and don: a love story
Befitting a film made by someone who has spent his career in visual design, the film is awash in eye candy, from the sets to the clothing, of course. Being angsty, stereotype shattering and set in '62, of course it's Mad Men-esque, and Jon Hamm even has an appearance in the film, although it is just his recognizable voice over the phone.

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