Amoeblog

Amoeba Hollywood Carries New Selection of Modern Board Games

Posted by Amoebite, October 20, 2016 06:43pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music, Board Games- By Chris Curtis

A home entertainment considered completely outmoded or obsolete by the mainstream public re-emerges after years of neglect into newfound popularity. Sounds like the story of the vinyl LP, right? Well, it is, but it’s also the story of an even older recreation that may seem passé in today’s high-tech world. The board game, which dates back at least to Ancient Egypt, has made a dramatic comeback in recent years. But in most cases, it’s not old games being revived. Rather, hundreds of new titles are being produced annually by both established companies and upstart indies, many via crowdfunding. It’s been said we’re living through the Golden Age of Boardgames, and while other artforms may have had their best days behind them, it’s inspiring to see a craft refining itself and getting objectively better.

The ball got rolling for modern games in the mid-'90s with a German game called Settlers of Catan. It gained worldwide popularity, and impressed many with its ease of play and elegant and efficient game mechanics. For Americans, who had grown up on luck-based roll-the-dice-and-move games, Catan and other “Eurogames” showed that gameplay could be more strategic yet still light and casual. Interest was stoked by word-of-mouth and the internet, and by the early 2000s American game designers and manufacturers were taking note, and responding with strong titles of their own. Designers from around the world increasingly jumped into the creative arena, with Japan especially producing many outstanding games.

What specifically makes modern games (or “Designer” games - so-called because the creator’s name is Amoeba Music, Board Gamesusually on the box) different than games we’re accustomed to? Very few function like Monopoly, where the player is constant victim to the whims of the dice and board, landing on a space and following instructions. Many have no dice at all and some involve only cards or tiles. Usually, players will have at least one meaningful decision to make every time their turn comes up, so strategy plays a greater role. Themes are often fanciful or historical, which can make the game more immersive, especially with well-designed components and artwork. Designer games are often less cut-throat and confrontational than games like Sorry. They avoid player elimination (i.e., you go bankrupt and must sit out the remainder of the game) and typically keep the running time under an hour or so with less downtime. Many games can be played in 20 minutes or less, which make them easier to fit into contemporary schedules.

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Cruise to Mexico: Part 8

Posted by Job O Brother, December 13, 2010 02:09pm | Post a Comment
double fist drunk
(A lady raises her pinky.)


Day 5 (Part 1)

Friday. September 16, 2010

AT SEA




The best part of mornings on-board a cruise ship is waking up to the scent, sight, and sound of your ship at sea. The Pacific Ocean has a myriad of blues in her pallet, all of them are mesmerizing and crushable. For real. If the Pacific Ocean were a lady, I would totally marry her.

The worst part of mornings on-board a cruise ship are the breakfasts. It’s as though they were prepared by contestants on Top Chef who were given the challenge to “make as many things as possible using only white flour and remember – no fresh ingredients!”

By the episode’s end, my tummy loses. Bacon that remarkably resembles fried leather shoes, eggs that looked like they came from a chicken’s leukemia ward, fruit salads that seemed so depressed you’d think they should be sprinkled with Prozac, not sugar – and since I couldn’t bring myself to eat any of these aforementioned items, I was left with the option of pancakes covered in waffle cupcakes, drizzled in biscuits with a dash of bagel. One bite of this, and coffee became my only morning meal.

"I just feel like I'm never gonna accomplish anything that matters."

There are so many invalids on-board, trudging slowly, hunched over stainless-steel canes or walkers, oxygen tanks everywhere underfoot – you can easily forget you’re on a luxury liner, not a retirement home. The greatest danger is not that the ship will sink, but that you’ll get run-over by a Rascal Scooter.
transport
Faces of Death: Cruise Ship Edition

By lunchtime I was ravenous – the coffee that became my only breakfast was, in turn, making a meal of my stomach lining. By Day 5, I decided to try lunch in the main dining room. Up till then, most of my days were off-ship so I could eat from vendors at the ports. I was curious to see if formal lunch was as good as the formal dinners.

It wasn’t. I ordered a salad in which each separate ingredient somehow tasted like water. Put them all together and you get, well, a whole lot of water, but with texture. Despite this disappointment, there was a singular joy in my lunchtime: it was the first meal there where I didn’t have to hear the staff singing “Happy Birthday” to someone. Yay, God!

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Game Covers

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, June 6, 2010 09:20pm | Post a Comment