Amoeblog

Noir City 12 Goes International in San Francisco: 1/24 - 2/2

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 23, 2013 06:18pm | Post a Comment

The Film Noir Foundation's yearly festival Noir City returns to the historic Castro Theatre January 24 - noir city san franciscoFebruary 2, 2014. The 12th edition of the world's most popular film noir festival is going international, exploding the long-held belief that noir stories and style are a specifically American phenomenon.

"Our desire to expand the scope of the festival has resulted in our most ambitious program ever," says festival impresario and host Eddie Muller. "Its overall impact will, I suspect, change many people's long-standing ethnocentric preconceptions about film noir."

Focusing on the years immediately following World War II, the festival features classic noir films from France, Mexico, Japan, Argentina, Germany, Spain, Norway, and Britain, as well as a complementary sampling of homegrown Hollywood flicks. The 27 films in the series will conclusively prove that the cinematic movement known as "Noir" spanned the globe, and its style, sexiness, and cynicism crossed all international borders. Check out the full schedule HERE!

Get your tickets now and know that you are supporting a great cause; the dollars you spend at the festival go towards the Film Noir Foundation's year-round restoration efforts.

Stone Roses Profiled in New Doc

Posted by Billy Gil, October 23, 2013 06:24pm | Post a Comment

the stone rosesThe Stone Roses were one of the best and most beloved Britpop bands of the early ’90s, helping the dance-influenced Madchester sound of the late ’80s and early ’90s take the British charts by storm with their classic self-titled debut album. In the U.S. their immediate impact was smaller, yet their influence stretched from predecessors like Oasis to more recent bands including Jagwar Ma and Diiv. Their sound, a blend of jangly guitars not unlike those employed by Johnny Marr in The Smiths with dancier beats and psychedelic effects, helped make them NME cover stars at the time, as did the presence of cocky, charismatic frontman Ian Brown, who once declared the band would become “the biggest band ever.” The band's second album failed to take off, and the band broke up in 1996. They reunited in 2012, after 16 years, to headline the Coachella Music and Arts Festival and have even garnered the Twitter ire of one Azealia Banks, as sure a sign as any that the band’s relevance continues today.

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The Muscle Shoals Documentary: A Tale of Two Studios, One Sound

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, October 17, 2013 03:50pm | Post a Comment
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From Dave Grohl's Sound City to 20 Feet From Stardom there have been some really great music-related documentary films released recently, perhaps none so overwhelmingly transcendental as the story of a reliable hit-maker and an iconic sound rooted in a sleepy corner of Alabama called Muscle Shoals
muscle shoals welcome sign alabama soul music fame rick hall studios documentary

Between providing the most literal rendering of "I'll Take You There" and dabbling in discovering the metaphysical origins of what has come to be lauded as the "Muscle Shoals sound," Muscle Shoals blends reflective interviews of those who lived and tracked the music, bolstered by snippets and loops of the iconic sound itself, with layers of pastoral vistas and rustic rural vignettes of the surrounding countryside, playing like a gorgeous cinematographic back-mask. Combined with the fleeting highs and the tragic lows experienced by musician, songwriter and Fame Studios producer Rick Hall, his session players, The Swampers (who would later found a similarly nondescript recording studio across town in a former casket factory), among others still living in the glory of the Muscle Shoals nexus, the film also depicts the triumph of a phenomenon bigger than anyone can fully understand nowadays: the earthly crossroads of soul, country, funk and rock and roll at a time when "separate but equal" was the order of the day. 

Summer is Icumen In... Again: The Wicker Man: Final Cut now in theaters!

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, October 1, 2013 07:05pm | Post a Comment
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Not an Autumn goes by that I don't indulge in the ultimate cinematic sacrifice to the regenerative forces of Spring by viewing the most excellent British cult classic The Wicker Man (not to be confused with the poorly-honeyed and over-the-top misogynist romp of a remake starring Nicholas Cage). This year's viewing, however, will be an extra special treat in that the film is celebrating 40 years of horrific pagan pageantry with the theatrical release of The Wicker Man: The Final Cut wherein director Robin Hardy's original vision is finally restored.

the wicker man final cut robin hardy british cult horror comedy naked witch women stonehenge druid wicca new age fertility rite ritual flame beltane may day

For those who have never seen it, take warning. This film is unsettling in that it is a bit of a musical studded with weird sex scenes and even weirder segments debatably necessary nudity, often interrupted by non-violent horror elements and culturally-confused comedic spells all revolving around a central mystery thread: a child is reported missing from a remote Hebridean island and the stringent Sergeant Howie (Edward Woodward), come from the mainland, is determined to find out what happened. The result is a very revisitable cinematic delight, though it ultimately leaves disconcerting and, depending on your moral compass, a horrifically distressful aftertaste.

King Arthur lives (and procures a shrubbery) this Sunday at the Castro Theatre in SF!

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, September 21, 2013 03:48pm | Post a Comment
 castro theater doubel feature film movie excalibur month python and the holy grail king arthur legend comedy drama
This Sunday the dark sensuality and brutal magic of John Boorman's Excalibur collides with Monty Python's excessively silly, low-budget quest for the Holy Grail as San Francisco's own Castro Theatre hosts a double feature comprised of two of the best loved interpretations of Arthurian Legend ever committed to memory...I mean celluloid film. With two showings of each film, the latter offering free coconut shells while supplies last, this cinematic concurrence is just one of many Castro two-fers that has really got me feeling thrilled to go out to the movies again (not to mention that these double feeches are two movies for one low price, dig). If you happen make it out to either of the late showings beware of yours truly, the geek that chants entire spans of dialogue in hushed tones (especially the Charm of Making) or otherwise forgets that Monty Python and the Holy Grail is not the Rocky Horror Picture Show (cue coconuts). 

Below I honor those who share my enthusiasm for these films by sharing not original, but rather very lovingly recut, fan-made trailers for both Excalibur and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. [huzzah]
 
EXCALIBUR shows at 1:45, 6:30...




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