Amoeblog

Week Two of The Film Noir Festival at The Egyptian Theatre

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, April 8, 2010 11:10am | Post a Comment


So it seems that the Film Noir Foundation folks have another great week of programming lined up for us! It starts off on Friday with an intense double featuring one of Robert Mitchum's rarely screened gems The Locket along with The Bodyguard, which happens to be Robert Altman's first big writing credit. Saturday brings a Broderick Crawford mid 50's double feature that includes a spectacular Gloria Grahame performance in yet another film based on Emile Zola's La Bete Humaine. Sunday brings a "crooked world" double that includes Mickey Rooney's great Drive A Crooked Road, a quick paced film written by Blake Edwards and featuring some great old arcade footage. I will definitely make it to this one, as it's paired with something I've never seen-- Walk A Crooked Mile, described as an anti-commie / atomic scare flick featuring Raymond Burr and Dennis O'Keefe set in San Francisco. Wednesday brings a Neo-Noir featuring an all mannequin cast entitled Eve's Necklace. Thursday rounds out the week with a Gothic Noir double from the early 40's featuring Albert Dekker, Susan Hayward, Francis Farmer & Elisha Cook Jr!

Film Noir Festival Returns To The Egyptian Theatre

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 31, 2010 11:15am | Post a Comment
April is just about the finest month of the year to be in Los Angeles. The weather usually remains mild with sunny days & cool nights. Rainy days and scattered showers still pop up and I tend to appreciate them much more than winter storms, as I can smell the impending triple digit heatwaves that are right around the corner. Daylight savings time has brought an extra hour to get things done, the smell of jasmine is in the air and new year resolutions have been broken so there's more room at the gym. But all of this pales in comparison to the real reason why April is so special in LA...



Oh yes, the film noir festival returns to the spectacular Egyptian Theatre for the 12th year in a row. Yes, I'll tolerate all that Hollywood Blvd. has become for this series of showings -- suburban crowds seeking companionship and/or a fight down at da clubs, the $20 parking spaces, the bluetoothed security goons shoulder checking pedestrians. I'll deal because there's always a couple of gems in the mix at this festival to make all these hassles worth while. Highlights of  the first week include William Castle & George Raft doubles, live appearances by Julie Adams & Rhonda Fleming and a brand new print of the classic Cry Danger
rhonda fleming lp cover
Egyptian Theatre

GRIPPING GRAFFITI DRAMA WHOLETRAIN SCREENS IN SF & LA

Posted by Billyjam, February 24, 2010 02:30pm | Post a Comment
Scene from the making of the film WHOLETRAIN, which was shot in Poland

Graffiti fans should make a point of attending the California screenings of the powerful new European graffiti themed feature film WHOLETRAIN that screens this evening (Feb 24) in San Francisco at the Goethe-Institut and on Monday (March 1st) at the same institution's center in Los Angeles. After the screenings in each city director Florian Gaag will be on hand for a Q&A session.

Gaag's first feature, WHOLETRAIN was shot in Poland, has English subtitles and has already been a film festival fave. It tells the story of a tight knit crew of graffiti writers, Tino, David, Elyas and Achim, who go through a lot of troubles (including run-ins with the law and a growing feud with a rival graf crew) in pursuit of their art.
WHOLETRAIN
WHOLETRAIN is full of wonderful, memorable scenes like the one where Tino (convincingly played by Florian Renner) is trying to persuade his friend and ever-frowning crew mate David (played by Mike Adler), who is on his last strike with the authorities, to go back out that night on an important train "bombing" mission in which they have a final opportunity to prove their worth against the rival graf crew.

If they miss this last chance, "We look like a finger painting group. Unless we do a wholetrain, we can battle housewives in the local drawing class," warns Tino. 

Continue reading...

(In which Job introduces the character Ryan.)

Posted by Job O Brother, February 21, 2010 06:56pm | Post a Comment

Ryan "Mouth-hole" Cassano

This weekend I played host to a friend of mine, Ryan “Mouth-hole” Cassano, who was visiting from my beloved home town of Nevada City, California. He had come to investigate 1980’s video arcade games and literature concerning it for some future enterprise that I’m not at liberty to divulge but involves alcohol, supermodels, and rooms of plastic balls.

He met me after my hard but spiritually fulfilling shift at Amoeba Music Hollywood, waiting out the last few minutes of my shift by browsing the clearance section of soundtracks, where he found two items that made him squeal like a flame-covered, 500 pound, chocolate gorilla who sounded like a happy little girl: the soundtrack to the film Kill the Moonlight (which features some very early work by Beck), and to the documentary King of Kong: Fistful of Quarters.

The latter was serendipitous, as it was related to his arcade quest. In fact, he was traveling with a copy of that very film and insisted I watch it with him. I told him he wasn’t the boss of me and I can do whatever I want and I hate I hate him I hate him, then we drove back to my place for a home-cooked dinner of gimlets.
Just like Ma used to make!

I introduced him to the refined art of Tom of Finland, who’s work is so lovingly collected in my Taschen art book. He found it deeply educational and oftentimes frightening. Imagine my embarrassment when, half way through flipping through the book, I realized it was a souvenir photo album of my trip to the Anne Frank House! A common mistake, sure, but no less silly.

Puzzler: Can you tell which one is which?

After half an hour of explaining to him the difference between gay sex and the methodical genocide of six million people, we decided to go to bed.

Night Of The Hunter / Cape Fear Double @ The Egyptian

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, October 27, 2009 12:05am | Post a Comment

I, for one, am very excited about this particular double feature; both films feature roles that are amongst  Robert Mitchum's finest and most intense. Night Of The Hunter took me a while to warm up to, as it carries such a massive reputation that I was a bit let down upon first viewing. A couple years later I caught it on late night TV and wondered what kind of funk I must have been in the first time. The film is a true oddity and quite beautifully directed by Charles Laughton. The original version of Cape Fear is pretty gripping from the get go and I'm sure that the swamp scenes will look gorgeous on the Egyptian's huge screen. Gregory Peck gives a great performance as the tortured father and the adaptation of John D. MacDonald's novel The Executioners is none too shabby. I'd say that no one does justice to the inherent menace of the swamplands like MacDonald. Also, author Preston Neal Jones will be on hand signing his book Heaven and Hell to Play With: The Filming of Night of the Hunter.

Wednesday October 28th
Night Of The Hunter / Cape Fear
Egyptian Theatre
6712 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028-4605
(323) 461-2020


Cape Fear
trailer


Night Of The Hunter
boat scene

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