Noir City Film Festival Keeps It Reel in San Francisco, 1/25 - 2/3!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 3, 2013 11:55am | Post a Comment

Noir City, the most popular film noir festival in the world, is BACK! Defying media reports regarding the Noir city film festival audra wolfmann eddie mullerdemise of repertory cinema and 35 millimeter film, the 11th edition of the Noir City film festival (at the Castro Theatre from January 25th - February 3rd) will present its most expansive schedule yet! Over ten days, Noir City will screen 27 films, including three brand new 35mm restorations funded by the Film Noir Foundation and the noir-loving moviegoers of San Francisco!

This festival kicks off with a tribute to special guest star Peggy Cummins, legendary for her ferocious performance as carnival sharpshooter Annie Laurie Starr in Gun Crazy (1950). Ms. Cummins, traveling all the way from her home in London, will be interviewed onstage by host Eddie Muller following a screening of the film!

As always, NOIR CITY will present both celebrated classics and wonderful rarities: some newly rescued from extinction and presented in glorious new 35mm prints, others screening for the first time in gorgeous 4K digital restorations. Opening weekend will feature the world premiere of two of the Film Noir Foundation's latest film restoration projects Try and Get Me! (1950) and Repeat Performance (1949).

But that's not all! The hugely popular Noir City Nightclub returns on Saturday night, February 2, 2013. Partiers will time travel to 1949 for an extraordinary evening of scintillating music, sexy striptease, dancing, and drinking ($5 cocktails— beat that price!), all in a new vintage venue, the Regency Lodge (1290 Sutter Street at Van Ness). This year's show, emceed by "Czar of Noir" Eddie Muller, includes the sizzling jazz of the Dmitri Matheny Group (unveiling its "Crime Scenes Suite"), the sultry pop-noir stylings of Erin Brazill and the Brazillionaires ("The Hitchcock Suite"), the return of international striptease sensation Evie Lovelle, torch song temptress Laura Ellis, and the uniquely soulful and sinister serenades of El Radio Fantastique! Best of all, festival screenings are arranged so NOIR CITY attendees can attend the soiree without missing a single film!

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Noir City Xmas at SF's Castro Theater, December 19th

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 2, 2012 06:55pm | Post a Comment
noir city noir film foundation xmas lady in the lake holiday affair

The Film Noir Foundation, dedicated to preserving films in danger of being lost or irreparably damaged AND the organization behind the Noir City film festival, presents the third annual Noir City Xmas show on Wednesday, December 19th at San Francisco's majestic Castro Theatre! Get your tickets HERE!

The Yule-themed double bill pairs The Lady in the Lake (1947), a subjective camera adaption of Raymond Chandler's novel set during the holidays, and Holiday Affair (1949) with noir icon Robert Mitchum hot on the trail of nubile Janet Leigh.

The evening will also feature the unveiling of the full schedule for NOIR CITY 11 (1/25 - 2/3/13), the spectacular new NOIR CITY poster, and the latest Ms. NOIR CITY herself! Defying all the latest media death knells regarding repertory cinema and 35mm, NOIR CITY 11 will present its most expansive schedule yet with29 films, including three brand-new 35mm restorations funded by the Film Noir Foundation . . . and the noir lovers of San Francisco! 

But here's a little more about the films you will see at Noir City Xmas:

HOLIDAY AFFAIR 7:30pm (1949, RKO, dir. Don Hartman. 87 min.) Big bad Bob Mitchum is on the run from one of his RKO noir thrillers when he gets a job as house dick at a department store and busts adorable Janet Leigh, who's spying for the competition. Okay, it's not noir. It's a warm and witty romantic Christmas movie minus all the sappy sentiment. Hey, a little love never killed anybody!

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14th Annual Los Angeles Film Noir Festival- Final Weekend!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 4, 2012 11:00am | Post a Comment


This weekend brings the 14th Annual Los Angeles Film Festival to a close with a bang.  Nine screenings will be presented over 3 days, with a couple of interviews & a book signing thrown in for good measure!

Friday May 4th brings a great Dashiel Hammett double in The Maltese Falcon (1931) / City Streets. This pairing continues with Thursday's pre-code, proto-noir theme, City Streets is a newly restored print courtesy of UCLA and is a must see for Gary Cooper fans.

Saturday offers up two separate events.  A special 3:00 matinee showing of The Postman Always Rings Twice featuring a discussion with award winning noir novelist Denise Hamilton.  The evening presents a Geraldine Fitzgerald double Three Strangers / Nobody Lives Forever.  Fitzgerald's son, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, will be discussing the films and signing his book Luck & Circumstance:  A Coming Of Age In Hollywood, New York & Beyond.  

Rounding out the weekend, Circumstantial Evidence / Sign Of The Ram has the Sunday matinee slot & Mary Ryan, Detective / Kid Glove Killer will finish off the evening.  Leading lady Marsha Hunt will be on hand to discuss her roles in these not-on-DVD rarities.

14th Annual Los Angeles Film Noir Festival Continues!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, April 27, 2012 12:30pm | Post a Comment

This Friday, April 20th was the kick off for the 14th annual Los Angeles Film Noir Festival @ the Egyptian Theatre. Opening night's Alad Ladd double played to a full house and for good reason!  The newly restored print of the long lost Great Gatsby was a delight as was seeing the classic This Gun For Hire.  Night number two , Naked Alibi / Suddenly, was given an interesting analysis by Charles Reece in his most recent posting, click here to check it out.  Sunday's triple, featuring Cornell Woolrich based films, topped off one of the best weekends of film that I've had in many years.  There was a bonus showing of Suddenly on Sunday for those who had been disappointed with the lousy digital projection the night before.  

Week number 2 starts off with a Arlene Dahl pairing in Scene Of The Crime / Reign Of TerrorNorman Lloyd will be on hand to discuss his part in Scene of the Crime.  A Mid 50's take on the trials and tribulations of life on the Manhattan docks is offered on Saturday. Actress Julie Adams will be on hand to discuss her adventures in making Slaughter on 10th Ave.  Sunday offers a gangster double featuring Dick Powell & George Raft, Wednesday brings us a great "corrupt cop" double and Thursday packs a pre-code punch with a couple of "proto-noir" gems.

Police Power: Naked Alibi (1953) & Suddenly (1954)

Posted by Charles Reece, April 23, 2012 01:51am | Post a Comment
It's film noir festival time again at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood. First up for me was a Sterling Hayden double-feature. 

naked alibi poster

Hayden plays a totalitarian-minded chief detective whose brutal methods are currently being investigated by bureaucrats intent on making crime easier and policing harder. Dwelling in the loopholes of law and order, these hobgoblins are always the real villains in films with the ultimate goal of undermining what namby-pamby liberal types call checks and balances that are supposed to keep our country from being a police state: elected officials, lawyers and, of course, the press. Against the knee-jerks, the film suggests that the chief's mind is like a vast differential engine, intuiting the deterministic equations in the chaos of criminality where a wavering eyebrow inevitably leads to multiple homicides -- imagine a cross between Harry Callahan and the precogs from Philip K. Dick's The Minority Report. When he tries to explain how he knows that a church-going, family-oriented baker is a copkiller despite having solid character witnesses, airtight alibis and no priors, a fellow detective looks about as comprehending as a neanderthal hearing the obelisk play Ligeti for the first time. Rational deduction becomes mystical, a voodoo conjuring best left to the professional witchdoctors. The audience is assured of the chief's preternatural acumen when Gloria Grahame shows up as the baker's girlfriend in a border town. Anyone who's watched enough film noir knows that dating her means you're guilty of something and will soon die for what you've done. Had this film been made today, it most likely would've been about police brutality and the dangers of trusting those in power, but because it has Joseph Breen's stamp of approval, the "criminals" had to be punished and "cop" was mutually exclusive to "evil." Which means that'll you'll enjoy the film if you tend to wax nostalgic for 1930s Italy or lean left with a masochistic sense of humor.

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