Curtis Harrington's Night Tide Screens at SF's Balboa Theatre

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 10, 2016 06:16pm | Post a Comment

Night Tide

By Brett Stillo

The early 1960s were a great time for nightmares. This was an era of surreal psycho-thrillers filmed in Night Tideeerie contrasts of black and white. One Step Beyond, Boris Karloff’s Thriller, and the one and only Twilight Zone flickered on TV screens while neighborhood movie theaters and drive-ins were haunted by low-budget creep-outs like Carnival of Souls, The Mask, Confessions of an Opium Eater, and Curtis Harrington’s eerie Night Tide.

Night Tide, which will play at San Francisco’s Balboa Theatre on Wednesday, January 13th, is less of a horror movie and more like a weird dream. Harrington, a colleague of Kenneth Anger who directed several '50s avant-garde short films, orchestrates a gothic beatnik fable set amid the crumbling ruins of a dreamland known as Venice, California. The shadows of Film Noir drape over this desolate landscape. You can almost picture the film's "hero" Dennis Hopper turning a corner and running into a haggard Tom Neal from Detour. The destinies of these two downbeat characters may be different, but they seem to be on similar paths.

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NOIR CITY 14: The Art of Darkness, 1/22 - 1/31

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 5, 2016 03:41pm | Post a Comment

Noir City 14

The Film Noir Foundation's world-famous yearly film festival NOIR CITY returns to San Francisco's majestic Peeping TomCastro Theatre for its 14th edition January 22-31. This year's theme is "The Art of Darkness," delivering 25 noir-stained films exploring the pressures, pitfalls, paranoia, and pain of being an artist in an indifferent and cruel world. This time the tortured protagonists aren't felons or fall guys, they're writers, painters, dancers, photographers, and musicians. I think we can all relate.

The festival features a fascinating line-up of films, including noir must-sees like Nicholas Ray's In A Lonely Place (1950, with Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame), Fritz Lang's Scarlet Street (1945, Edward G. Robinson, Dan Duryea, Joan Bennett), and Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window (1954, James Stewart) to several welcomed surprises like Michael Powell's Peeping Tom (1960, Carl Boehm), Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow-Up (1966, David Hemmings), and Howard Franklin's The Public Eye (1992, Joe Pesci).

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Noir City Xmas Returns to San Francisco's Castro Theatre, Dec. 16

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 6, 2015 06:37pm | Post a Comment

Noir City Xmas

Noir City once again offers the dark gift of film noir for the holidays. Our friends at the Film Noir Foundation present Noir City Xmas, their 6th annual holiday double feature, on Wednesday, December 16 at San Francisco's historic Castro Theatre. This year's dark holiday greetings come in the form of a double dose of Noir Noel: Max Ophuls' The Reckless Moment (1949) at 7:30 and Henry Hathaway's Kiss of Death (1947) at 9:30. Both films will screen in 35mm. Tickets for this exceptional event are only $12 for the double bill (that's less than the cost of a single holiday eggnog at any bar in town).

The Reckless Moment
The Reckless Moment
Kiss of Death
Kiss of Death

In addition to a seasonally themed double bill of vintage noir films, host Eddie Muller will be revealing the complete schedule (and scorching new poster!) for the eagerly anticipated NOIR CITY 14. They will also sell NOIR CITY 14 Passports (full series passes) at the theatre along with some brand new official Film Noir Foundation merchandise, so you can catch up on holiday gift shopping.

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OOFJ Bring Their Electro-Pop Noir to Amoeba July 23

Posted by Billy Gil, July 10, 2015 09:15am | Post a Comment

oofjListening to OOFJ feels like watching a film noir from the future. Melodramatic strings, bubbling electronic beats and Katherine Mills-Rymer’s desperately breathy vocals come together for a sound that wouldn’t feel out of place in a new David Lynch or Roman Polanski film. That’s not accidental—while you could draw comparisons to bands like Portishead and Goldfrapp, the band’s composer, Jenno Bjornkjaer, has worked on film scores like Lars Von Trier’s Melancholia, during which he met his musical and romantic partner in Mills-Rymer. The debut album from OOFJ (which stands for “orchestra of Jenno”) pulls heavily from filmic inspiration but manages to put that into four-minute electro-pop songs that are heady and addictively catchy in equal doses.

I took a minute to speak with the duo before their performances at Amoeba Hollywood July 23 at 6 p.m. and their slot playing Amoeba Music’s curated Red Bull Sound Select show July 30 at the Echoplex with Baths and Wrestlers (click here to RSVP).

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Noir City 13: 'Til Death Do Us Part

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 22, 2014 05:41pm | Post a Comment
Noir City

The 13th edition of the Film Noir Foundation's yearly film festival Noir City returns to the Castro Theatre in San Francisco, January 16–25, 2015. This year's schedule is overflowing with 25 extraordinary titles depicting the darker side of marriage. See characters who crave a perfect and permanent union, those who'll stop at nothing to preserve it, and those who will do anything to escape it.

The program runs the gamut from revered cinema masterpieces such as Luchino Visconti's les diaboliquesOssessione and H. G. Clouzot's Les Diaboliques to daffy delights such as Doris Day's absurdly entertaining Julie and Douglas Sirk's sensational (and silly) Sleep, My Love. The shadows are shed briefly to present the most perfect marriage: William Powell and Myrna Loy as Nick and Nora Charles in a holiday double bill of The Thin Man and After the Thin Man. Several subsets of films will be presented, honoring the work of creative talents such as Joan Fontaine, Robert Ryan, Barbara Stanwyck, Douglas Sirk, and 1950's husband and wife filmmakers Virginia and Andrew Stone.

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