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Editor of Eric & Charles DVD Review Show wins an ACE Eddie!

Posted by Charles Reece, February 24, 2012 11:52am | Post a Comment
eric kench eddie

The Eric & Charles DVD Review Show wouldn't be the favorite of spambots everywhere without the magical touch of Eric "Scissorhands" Kench. Above, he can be seen with his American Cinema Editor's award, the Eddie, and presenter Anne V. Coates, editor of Lawrence of Arabia (Kench's favorite film). Although not quite as illustrious as appearing on this blog, Kench breathed the same exalted air as Clint Eastwood for one night. While I wouldn't dismiss the importance of a good leather jacket, Alexander Payne explained the value of the art: "One, editing is the ongoing process of disguising how bad the film really is. Number two, every day we edit, we make the film suck less. And number three, editing is the natural state of man." Here's the Variety article.

WWTarkovskyD? Editing Reality

Posted by Charles Reece, March 31, 2008 11:54am | Post a Comment
This interview with Orson Welles by New Wave assistant director and Cahiers critic Charles Bitsch and film critic André Bazin reminded me of why The Bourne Ultimatum won the Oscar for editing this year:

For me, almost everything that is called mise en scène is a big joke. In the cinema, there are very few people who are really metteurs-en-scène; there are very few who have ever had the opportunity to direct. The only mise en scène of real importance is practiced in the editing. I needed nine months to edit Citizen Kane, six days a week. Yes, I edited [The Magnificent] Ambersons, despite the fact that there were scenes not by me, but my editing was modified. The basic editing is mine and, when a scene of the film holds together, it is because I edited it. In other words, everything happens as if a man painted a picture: he finishes it and someone comes to do the touch up, but he cannot of course add paint all over the surface of the canvas. I worked months and months on the editing of Ambersons before it was taken away from me: all this work is thus there, on the screen. But for my style, for my vision of cinema, the editing is not one aspect, it is the aspect. Directing is an invention of people like you; it is not an art, or at most an art for a minute a day. This minute is terribly crucial, but it happens only very rarely. The only moment where one can exercise any control over a film is in the editing. But in the editing room, I work very slowly, which always unleashes the temper of the producers who snatch the film from my hands. I don’t know why it takes me so much time: I could work forever on the editing of a film. For me, the strip of celluloid is put together like a musical score, and this execution is determined by the editing; just like a conductor interprets a piece of music in rubato, another will play it in a very dry and academic manner and a third will be very romantic, and so on. The images themselves are not sufficient: they are very important, but are only images. The essential is the length of each image, what follows each image: it is the very eloquence of the cinema that is constructed in the editing room.