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Balboa Theatre's Thursday Night Rock Docs

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 14, 2014 07:19pm | Post a Comment

San Francisco’s historic Balboa Theatre continues their run of screenings of the most amazing The Last Waltzrockumentaries of all times this Fall with Thursday Night Rock Docs.

This Thursday, October 16th, don't miss Martin Scorsese’s The Last Waltz, which was shot on Thanksgiving Day of 1976 at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. Hailed as one of the greatest concert films of all time, this film commemorates The Band’s final performance (as a quintet) after 16 years on the road. Keep and eye out for Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Emmylou Harris, Van Morrison, Eric Clapton, Muddy Waters, and Neil Diamond. Shot with multiple 35mm cameras by the likes of Vilmos Zsigmond (The Deer Hunter), Laszlo Kovacs (Easy Rider), and Michael Chapman (Raging Bull).

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Joanna Newsom and the Magical Tour of 2004

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, March 21, 2014 04:20pm | Post a Comment
Joanna Newsom with Kevin Barker, Old Ironsides, Sacramento CA, July 10, 2004. Photo by Alissa Anderson. The Family Jams 2004 tour documentary devandra banhart vetiver new album 2014 harp freak folk nevada city california
Joanna Newsom with Kevin Barker at Old Ironsides, Sacramento CA, July 10, 2004. Photo by Alissa Anderson.

Once upon a time, or nearly ten years ago, a couple of bands combined their like-minded pursuit of music, travel, and kindred jamming and took to the road for what would later be known as the "Magical Tour of Two Thousand and Four" or The Family Jams, as revealed in Kevin Barker's tour documentary of the same name. Perhaps a more accurate description of the happening would be to say that it was an extended jaunt comprised of artists caught in Devendra Banhart's orbit at the time -- an Earthbound constellation of celestial talents that, for better or for worse, birthed the term Freak Folk. Though the documentary captures intimate performances and would-be private moments of many hearts and artists, the camera focuses mainly on Banhart, Vetiver, and Joanna Newsom.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Punk Band Death

Posted by Amoebite, November 20, 2013 12:50pm | Post a Comment

Death

Some music enthusiasts and critics alike believe the band Death to be the precursors to punk rock. Jack White is quoted as describing them as "ahead of punk and ahead of their time." Mos Def says, "These dudes were pre-Sex Pistols, pre-Bad Brains, pre-all that shit, and nobody knows about them. I don't understand how the world could forget them."

Death The story of Death is the stuff of legend. It's all documented in the film, A Band Called Death, a must see for all fans of music history and punk fans alike. After uncovering master tapes in an attic from sessions in the early '70s, Death's music was finally getting its chance. In 2009, Drag City Records released a 7-song LP entitled ...For The Whole World To See. Soon after, a reformed Death took to the stage, almost 30 years after they formed. Death was alive again!

Our What's In My Bag? crew caught up with the members of Death when they performed at Amoeba Hollywood in support of the documentary film, A Band Called Death.  These guys know good music and they love it all. They dig up a vinyl copy of Jamaican reggae singer Garnet Silk's Reggae Anthology. The guys keep it punk rock and pick up the Patti Smith classic, Horses, on vinyl. Of course they couldn't leave without taking back a little Motown. They manage to dig up Diana Ross & The Supremes Join The Temptations. Check out all their cool selections in this awesome What's In My Bag? episode.

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Stone Roses Profiled in New Doc

Posted by Billy Gil, October 23, 2013 06:24pm | Post a Comment

the stone rosesThe Stone Roses were one of the best and most beloved Britpop bands of the early ’90s, helping the dance-influenced Madchester sound of the late ’80s and early ’90s take the British charts by storm with their classic self-titled debut album. In the U.S. their immediate impact was smaller, yet their influence stretched from predecessors like Oasis to more recent bands including Jagwar Ma and Diiv. Their sound, a blend of jangly guitars not unlike those employed by Johnny Marr in The Smiths with dancier beats and psychedelic effects, helped make them NME cover stars at the time, as did the presence of cocky, charismatic frontman Ian Brown, who once declared the band would become “the biggest band ever.” The band's second album failed to take off, and the band broke up in 1996. They reunited in 2012, after 16 years, to headline the Coachella Music and Arts Festival and have even garnered the Twitter ire of one Azealia Banks, as sure a sign as any that the band’s relevance continues today.

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The Muscle Shoals Documentary: A Tale of Two Studios, One Sound

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, October 17, 2013 03:50pm | Post a Comment
fame studios muscle shoals alabama sheffield documentary music hit songs single sound soul country funk rock southern rick hall muscle shoals sound studio fame rick hall swampers 3614 jackson highway music soul documentary film southern rock funk country sheffield alabama recording hit singles songs

From Dave Grohl's Sound City to 20 Feet From Stardom there have been some really great music-related documentary films released recently, perhaps none so overwhelmingly transcendental as the story of a reliable hit-maker and an iconic sound rooted in a sleepy corner of Alabama called Muscle Shoals
muscle shoals welcome sign alabama soul music fame rick hall studios documentary

Between providing the most literal rendering of "I'll Take You There" and dabbling in discovering the metaphysical origins of what has come to be lauded as the "Muscle Shoals sound," Muscle Shoals blends reflective interviews of those who lived and tracked the music, bolstered by snippets and loops of the iconic sound itself, with layers of pastoral vistas and rustic rural vignettes of the surrounding countryside, playing like a gorgeous cinematographic back-mask. Combined with the fleeting highs and the tragic lows experienced by musician, songwriter and Fame Studios producer Rick Hall, his session players, The Swampers (who would later found a similarly nondescript recording studio across town in a former casket factory), among others still living in the glory of the Muscle Shoals nexus, the film also depicts the triumph of a phenomenon bigger than anyone can fully understand nowadays: the earthly crossroads of soul, country, funk and rock and roll at a time when "separate but equal" was the order of the day. 

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