Jazz on Film at the American Cinematheque Aug. 20-23

Posted by Amoebite, August 7, 2015 04:49pm | Post a Comment

Jazz on Film at the Aero Theatre

American Cinematheque presents Jazz on Film, a weekend of classic jazz films Aug. 20-23 at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica.

The first three screenings will feature giveaways of jazz CDs, courtesy of Sony Legacy recordings, and Amoeba gift certificates. Each screening starts at 7:30 p.m.

The series begins with Diana Ross' electrifying performance as Billie Holiday in Lady Sings the Blues Thursday, with an appearance by jazz musician Corky Hale. It continues on Friday with the shorts program Jazz on a Spring Day and Stormy Weather, which features singing from Lena Horne, Fats Waller and Cab Calloway; film noirs Anatomy of a Murder and Odds Against Tomorrow on Saturday; and Latin jazz films Cachao...Como Su Ritmo No Hay Dos, directed by Andy Garcia (who will be there in person for a discussion, time permitting) about original mambo king Cachao, and performance film Calle 54.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Charles Bradley

Posted by Amoebite, October 23, 2013 05:40pm | Post a Comment

Charles Bradley

Many artists spend years paying their dues, honing their craft, grinding out tour after tour chasing the ultimate dream of being discovered and landing a record deal. For most, the dream never happens. That is, unless you are Charles Bradley. The ultimate "rags to riches" story, Bradley went from obscurity to international fame almost overnight, but that's not what's amazing about his story. The amazing part is Charles Bradley got his break at 62 years old and his newfound fame is relatively fresh.

Charles' life has been nothing short of burdensome. You can say he graduated top of his class from the school of hard knocks and was last in line when it came to catching a break in life. From growing up poor to contemplating suicide to the murder of his brother, his story is documented in the film Charles Bradley: Soul of AmericaBradley spent two decades criss-crossing the United States working odd jobs and singing in small dives. Struggling to keep his head above water, Bradley took to performing as a James Brown impersonator named "Black Velvet." His luck changed one night when he was discovered by Daptone Records co-founder Gabriel Roth.

Two full-length albums and a handful of singles later, Charles Bradley is a powerhouse in the current "retro soul" movement that has gained audiences all over the world. The James Brown influence in Bradley is clear and some critics have also compared him to the late great Otis Redding. Bradley is like a living time capsule. He's a window into an era that many generations of music lovers were not able to see. Charles Bradley is the modern day James Brown. Check out his debut album, No Time For Dreaming, and the newly released follow-up, Victim of Love, to hear for yourself.

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The Art Of The LP Cover- Who Is That?

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 14, 2012 02:55pm | Post a Comment

Today's feature is a collection of ill advised portrait covers. 
Some are worse than others, I think that the Frank Sinatra / Lena Horne pairing might be my favorite.

The Art of the LP Cover- Leather

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 19, 2012 05:05pm | Post a Comment

(Où l'on considère les chanteurs français.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 22, 2011 04:32pm | Post a Comment
french poster

When you work at Amoeba Music there’s certain questions you answer over and over again:

“Where’s the restroom?”

“Why’s this one this price and this one this price?”

“Where can I find Edith Piaf?”

That last question is occasionally (to my endless amusement) pronounced as, “Where can I find Edith Pilaf?” to which I always want (but never) answer:

“We file her in-between Condoleezza Rice and Tim Curry. They all go great together.”

My internalized snarkiness aside, I’m all for Edith Piaf. Who could hate La Môme Piaf (her French nickname, literally translated as “That short woman in the black dress with the amazing voice but tragic make-up which someone should seriously having a talking-to-her about”)?

But I think too many people stop with Piaf and don’t investigate the chanson française of her peers, which is a shame because there’s so much to love. Below I offer some performers I think are à l'opposé de terrible.


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