Amoeblog

Music History Monday: December 30

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 30, 2013 09:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: December 30, 1928 - Rhythm & Blues legend Bo Diddley (born Ellas Otha Bates in McComb, MS). Happy Birthday to Bo on what would have been his 85th Birthday.
 


Born on this day: December 30, 1939 - R&B vocalist Kim Weston (born Agatha Natalie Weston in Detroit, MI). Happy 74th Birthday to this Motown legend!


Born on this day: December 30, 1942 - Songwriter, musician, producer, music video pioneer, and former Monkee Michael Nesmith (born Robert Michael Nesmith in Houston, TX). Happy 71st Birthday, Nez!
 

Born on this day: December 30, 1945 - Former Monkees vocalist Davy Jones (born David Thomas Jones in Manchester, UK). Happy Birthday to this pop music icon on what would have been his 68th Birthday. We miss you, Davy!
 

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Amoeba Bloggers Answer: What Was Your First Album?

Posted by Billy Gil, March 6, 2012 07:09pm | Post a Comment
I recently was at Amoeba Hollywood and overheard a customer telling an employee Davy Jones had died. I hadn’t heard the news yet. She brought it up because she was buying Katy Perry records for her daughter. She said her daughter didn’t even have a record player — she just wanted every bit of Katy Perry merchandise she could get her hands on.
 
The only artist I can ever remember being that obsessive about was The Smashing Pumpkins, but that was in high school. But it got me thinking about those first tapes, records, singles etc. that everyone got as a kid.
 
ace of base the signFor me, the first album I ever bought on my own was Ace of Base’s The Sign on cassette. I had always liked music, but at 11, I had just started to pay attention to what songs were on the radio. A friend made me a tape from the radio and “The Sign” was on it. I loved it. In the coming weeks and months, albums by Nirvana, Guns N’ Roses, Stone Temple Pilots, Green Day, and my beloved Pumpkins would follow, but really it all started with Ace of Base for me. Though if I’m being technical, I had a cassette single of Paula Abdul’s “Promise of a New Day” that I listened to constantly when I was like 9, but I didn’t buy that — I won it at a cousin’s music-themed birthday party, at which my dad dressed himself and me as Simon & Garfunkel. I had no idea who they were. I think I was Paul Simon.
 
While I’m embarrassing myself, I thought I’d extend the question to the other Amoeba bloggers: What was your first album? Not kids’ music, but not just the cool stuff, either — the tapes we once listened to repeatedly and then put away in a drawer somewhere once we realized how lame they were, though I’m still on the hunt for The Sign on vinyl. Here are their answers:
 
Eric Brightwell
the cure kiss me kiss me kiss meMy first record was Luciano Pavarotti's My Own Story, a compilation of “musical highlights of his spectacular career.” They used to heavily advertise it on TV when I got home from school, and I was hooked. My first cassette was Peter Gabriel's So. I'd liked the singles from it, but when “Big Time” came out, I was obsessed. My first CD was The Cure’s Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me. I was introduced to it by a German exchange student named Ina. Before she left I rode my bike into town to a Wal-Mart to get a blank cassette to dub it. I loved it so much, I thought it warranted being purchased on CD. 
 


Monkees singer Davy Jones Dead at 66

Posted by Billyjam, February 29, 2012 10:27am | Post a Comment
        

According to the TMZ website The Monkees singer Davy Jones has died at the age of 66 in Martin County, Florida. So far no cause of death has been released for the singer who is survived by his wife Jessica and four daughters from previous marriages. Above is the English born Jones and the Monkees doing  lead vocals on their 1967 number one Billboard hit single "Daydream Believer." Mike Nesmith, fellow Monkee, made this announcement today upon learning the sad news of Jones' passing: "While it is jarring, and sometimes seems unjust, or strange, this transition we call dying and death is a constant in the mortal experience that we know almost nothing about. I am of the mind that it is a transition and I carry with me a certainty of the continuity of existence. While I don’t exactly know what happens in these times, there is an ongoing sense of life that reaches in my mind out far beyond the near horizons of mortality and into the reaches of infinity. That David has stepped beyond my view causes me the sadness that it does many of you. I will miss him, but I won’t abandon him to mortality. I will think of him as existing within the animating life that insures existence. I will think of him and his family with that gentle regard in spite of all the contrary appearances on the mortal plane. David’s spirit and soul live well in my heart, among all the lovely people, who remember with me the good times, and the healing times, that were created for so many, including us. I have fond memories. I wish him safe travels."