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Music History Monday: September 22

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 22, 2014 10:16am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: September 22, 1958 - Rock legend Joan Jett (born Joan Marie Larkin in Wynnewood, PA) of The Runaways and Joan Jett & The Blackhearts. Happy 56th Birthday, Joan!
 


On this day in music history: September 22, 1969 - Sly & The Family Stone appear on the debut episode of the short lived TV series The Music Scene on the ABC television network. The band will perform a medley of their hits including "Everyday People," "Dance To The Music," "Hot Fun In The Summertime," "Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey," and "I Want To Take You Higher." The weekly show (hosted mostly by comedian David Steinberg) will run for only 17 episodes until January 12, 1970 when it is canceled.
 



On this day in music history: September 22, 1969The Band, the second album by The Band, is released. Produced by John Simon, it is recorded at 8841 Evanview Drive in West Hollywood from early - mid 1969. Issued as the follow up to their acclaimed debut Music From Big Pink, The Band will decide on a dramatic change of scenery to work on their next release. The album is recorded in a rented home in the Hollywood Hills owned by entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr.. The home's pool cabana will be converted into a recording studio for the duration of the sessions. It will yield a number of the band's classics including "Up On Cripple Creek" and "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down." The LP cover, featuring a sepia photo of the band by photographer Elliot Landy, will become known as "The Brown Album" by fans for the brown colored border around the front and back of the album jacket. The Band will peak at number nine on the Billboard Top 200 and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

Continue reading...

(In which we consider the mystical & tragic Judee Sill.)

Posted by Job O Brother, July 29, 2008 12:25pm | Post a Comment
robber

Last night I was mugged at gunpoint. The perpetrator not only made off with the $560.00 in cash that I was carrying (which I had intended to deposit today) but he knocked me down to the ground and kicked me hard enough that he left a nasty bruise in my ribs before he made his getaway on a magic, chocolate-colored Pegasus.

None of which is true, but it is a rather exciting way to begin this week’s blog entry, isn’t it? Except that, by lying to you, I have now risked alienating you emotionally, because you will now think twice about trusting what I tell you, even if it’s about how much I like that top you’re wearing and how to sets off the flecks of color in your shimmering eyes.

Speaking of violence and the romantic visage of your enduring beauty, I know some of you haven’t yet heeded my advice and investigated one of my most favorite balladeers of all time: Judee Sill.
 
Judee Sill
Judee Sill conducts herself well.

Judee’s story is one of tragic darkness, from which sprung gorgeous and sage songwriting. She was the Billie Holiday of the “Laurel Canyon sound.”

Influenced more by Johann Sebastian Bach than her 1970’s rock ‘n’ blow contemporaries, methodical composition such as fugue-structure, and over-dubbing of her own voice into chorale-style, inform her heart-wrenched post-hymns.

Her father and brother both died when she was a child, and her mother re-married to Kenneth Muse, an animator for one of my least favorite cartoons of all time, Tom & Jerry. (I mean really, the way that mouse antagonizes that poor cat, who very naturally fights back – both by his nature as a felis catus and in defense of Jerry’s cruelty – only to be downtrodden every time. What kind of message does that send to children? BE A BULLY. That’s what it tells ‘em. And then poor, sensitive, fat kids like me get the brunt of it. And all I ever wanted was to love and be loved. Is that so wrong?!)

[Insert sound of Job sobbing here]
Judee Sill

Judee left her dysfunctional home (I imagine her stepfather probably lured her head into a mouse-hole and bopped her face with a mallet) and hit the road for a life of free-wheeling druggery and armed robbery. She developed an addiction to that precocious li’l drug we call heroin. In order to pay for the habit, she prostituted herself (which almost certainly prepared her for a life as a professional musician).