Amoeblog

Cruise to Mexico: Part 4

Posted by Job O Brother, November 1, 2010 01:22pm | Post a Comment
Day 3

Tuesday. September 14, 2010

CABO SAN LUCAS

 

corey scholibo
The Glamorous Life

I woke up too full from the previous night’s dinner for breakfast.

Since the boyfriend likes to sleep-in until it’s time to go to bed for the night, I gathered up a few essentials: my book, spectacles, a Sharpie® brand felt tip marker, and my iPod; with these I made my escape from our darkened cabin and braved the outside world of the ship.

My goal was to find some nook, some cranny of the ship that wasn’t imbued with jolly, sunshine-soaked “good times” – a place where a second-generation Swede with deeply-rooted angst and a taste for Michael Gira side-projects could curl up and relax.

First and foremost, I was gonna need coffee, so I headed straight for the belly of the beast: the ship’s main mall. 

It really was a mall – a mall with upper stories that revealed people’s bedrooms; an odd combination of your local “galleria”, topped with layers of motel. You could sit outside the mock British pub next to the Ben & Jerry’s Scoop Shop and watch sun-burned, middle-aged people change into their fluorescent, flower-print swimwear. …If you’re into that sort of thing.

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BOUQUET OF ROSE

Posted by Charles Reece, August 23, 2009 04:06pm | Post a Comment
Sure, he interrupts too much to reiterate points that are already clear, but Charlie Rose has a solid track record for getting some pretty good interviews on the tube. All of his shows are archived online and can be watched for free. Here's what's been accompanying my suppers [click pic for the show]:

guillermo del toro

Guillermo del Toro talks about pain, being fat, vampires, The Hobbit, and what makes for good fantasy.

philip johnson

Rose is at his best when he's talking architecture. Here he talks to Philip Johnson about the architect's early days as a fascist and his homosexuality.

quentin tarantino

One of Rose's favorite guests is Quentin Tarantino who's appeared at least 9 times on the show. If there's a guy who likes to hear himself talk more than Rose, it's Tarantino. Thus, much boisterous conversation about film ensues. Also, it's interesting to compare the above interview with the director at the beginning of his superstardom to the way he sees himself now.

david foster wallace

Along with the Johnson interview, this one with writer David Foster Wallace is a favorite of mine. The man is just so genuine in his answers. He critiques the television interview while giving one and has a lot to say about film, particularly David Lynch. Speaking of whom:

david lynch eating panties

Here's Lynch being Lynch.

peter singer goat

Rose doesn't have philosophers on too much, but here's a recent interview with Peter Singer on moral obligation and poverty.

David Foster Wallace 1962 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, September 14, 2008 11:06am | Post a Comment

The novelist, essayist, humorist, and educator, David Foster Wallace, best known for his 1996 novel Infinite Jest, was found dead Friday night at his home in Claremont. His wife, Karen Green, discovered that Wallace had hanged himself when she returned home on Friday, September 12. He was 46.

Wallace won a cult following from the very start of his literary career with his darkly humorous and ironic wit. His first novel was published in 1987, The Broom of the System, but it was his 1996 novel, Infinite Jest, which shot him to the top of the literary world with its sprawling, complex and ambitious nonlinear plot that ran 1,079 pages.  

Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, Feb. 21, 1962, but was raised in Illinois, where his father taught philosophy at the University of Illinois and his mother taught English at the local community college.

He attended Amherst College, majoring in philosophy before switching his attention to creative writing. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1985, turning his senior thesis into the basis for The Broom of the System.

Since 2002, when he was named the first Roy E. Disney professor of creative writing, he had taught at Pomona College.