New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Organist Cameron Carpenter

Posted by Amoebite, February 4, 2015 11:14am | Post a Comment

Cameron Carpenter

Known for his vibrant flare in music and fashion, Cameron Carpenter is taking an ancient instrument to unconventional places. Praised and simultaneously criticized for his use of electronic organs, Carpenter is often referred to as a virtuoso for his unorthodox interpretations of standard organ arrangements.The classically trained organist earned two degrees from the prestigious Juilliard School in New York and he holds the distinction of being the first organist to be nominated for a GRAMMY award. His International Touring Organ show features a digital organ designed by Carpenter.

Cameron Carpenter visited Amoeba Hollywood recently to do a little shopping and to dispel some common misconceptions about Classical musicians. Cameron kicks off his What's In My Bag? episode with a copy of Wiz Khalifa's Deal Or No Deal and follows that up with Breakfast by Chiddy Bang. A huge fan of film scores and soundtrack composers, Cameron digs up a copy of Citizen Kane by Bernard Herrman. Watch the full episode below to hear Cameron explain why it's important for Classical musicians to know what's going on in popular music, from Hip Hop to Taylor Swift and everything in between.

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Dip Your Toes into Classical Music with Our Handy Conversion Chart

Posted by Amoebite, November 17, 2014 03:56pm | Post a Comment

Classical Music Conversion Chart

There is a type of customer at Amoeba Music that remains one of my favorites. Those brave souls who sheepishly make their way to the deepest, most remote area of the store: The Classical Section. They look vulnerable but hopeful, curious but intimidated. They come, knowing they want Classical music, but unsure how to find something they’ll like.

I’ve found the most efficient and fun way to lead folks is to learn about the other forms of music they love, and then use that to inspire selections. For every contemporary artist on the scene today, I assure you that there’s a composer in the Classical section with parallels. Beyond that, after working in record stores for over a decade, I’ve learned that people who enjoy certain acts – such as, let’s say, Black Sabbath – typically will also enjoy the string quartets of Dmitri Shostakovich.

It’s these interactions that led me to create the following "conversion chart." While no means infallible, think of it as a fun way to find a starting point in your adventure into the Classical music genre. But remember – no chart can replace a living, breathing, Amoeba Music employee. Don’t be afraid to come in and ask for suggestions. We love that!

The best time to come explore the Classical section will be November 28-30 when we're having a huge Classical blowout at our stores over Black Friday weekend. All red and green tag Classical CDs and vinyl will be 50% off! Sale details here.

4th of July Weekend Classical Blowout at All Amoeba Stores!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, June 22, 2014 05:40pm | Post a Comment

Looking for another reason to celebrate this coming 4th of July weekend? 

Classical Sale

Head down to any Amoeba store and partake in the 4th of July Weekend Classical Blowout! From Friday, July 4th to Sunday, July 6th, all three Amoeba locations will slash prices in half for all Classical Green and Red tag CDs and vinyl.

That's right! ALL Green and Red tag Classical CDs and LPs will be half off, all weekend long. Fresh bargains will be stocked and restocked often.

Can't make it to the stores? We always have amazing bargains available for purchase on, with Free Shipping in the US, so dig in HERE!

PLEASE NOTE: our stores are closing early for the July 4th holiday. Amoeba SF & Berkeley will close at 6pm, and Amoeba Hollywood closes at 9pm.

Classical Sale at Amoeba Stores

Download Classical Music's Greatest Hits

Posted by Rubin Meisel, March 6, 2014 04:43pm | Post a Comment

Explore Classical MusicOn the surface, Classical music and downloading is a bit of a mismatch. The chance of someone downloading Wagner’s four and a half hour opera, Parsifal, or Bach’s three hour choral masterpiece, St. Matthew Passion, to play on their iPad is rather remote. But there is a seemingly brisk business in downloading popular classical "Greatest Hits." The nomenclature of the potential buyer is different than that of a seasoned Classical aficionado (song versus composition piece for instance). Another challenge is the novice buyer may know what the piece (song) sounds like, but does not know the name of the composer. The novice buyer will probably know the piece from a movie, a commercial, video game or even a cartoon. Downloads generally give you the flexibility of sampling and then downloading the track you want or the entire piece. Explore our full catalog of Classical music downloads, which are 20% off in March with promo code DLSALE.

Here is a short list of some of the most popular Classical pieces being downloaded and some of the more accessible endeavors with which they are associated:

Bach Cello Suites

Divine Discs of the Electronic Continuum

Posted by Rick Frystak, September 13, 2012 02:28pm | Post a Comment

I am a searcher, never quite satisfied with music and sounds that already exist. There are many like myself out there. I am consistently persuing electronics-based records like these herein that testify to the pioneering spirit of those musicians, composers and scientists in search of the newest “musical “sounds available via technology of all levels of sophistication. Throughout history the primitive object or idea will lead the way to a monumentally sophisticated one, and visa-versa, as long as one is paying attention. Take thefuzzbox for example. That thing lead a revolution of little boxes that one plugs one’s instrument into to get big, wild (and conversely subtle) effects on said instrument ranging from fuzzy distortion to multiple octave voices to…God knows what now, huge racks of processing gear for a single riff.  At the same time in another part of the culture, Joel Chadabeguys and gals in long white lab coats were fiddling with room-sized computers to get a single tone that was not produced by a musical instrument, but alas, hallehlujah, a machine did it! And other folks were stringing audio tape across rooms and cutting inches of tape recordings to compose new recordings (Musique Concrete) to make other recordings to manipulate and, well, you get it.

The sense of experimentation and the ability to manifest those ideas has never left the true creative artist. There are sonic “searchers” among us that will never be satisfied with what already exists in the known sound worlds, and it is this motivation that fuels records like these. The daring ones, without concern of peer’s criticisms or naysayer’s pessimism, have forged ahead with whatever tools available to take these ideas and run with…no, FLY with them to the edges of reality.

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