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Hip-Hop Rap-Up, Week Ending 03.09.12: Too $hort, Madlib, WZRD, Malik Work, Timbo King, Dregs One, Notoriois B.I.G., Illmaculate, Cash Money & Marvelous + more

Posted by Billyjam, March 9, 2012 06:08pm | Post a Comment
Amoeba San Francisco Hip-Hop Top Five Week Ending 03:09:12

1) WZRD wzrd (Universal Republic)

2) Drake Take Care (Cash Money)

3 Tyga  Careless World: Rise Of The La (Cash Money)

4) Too $hort No Trespassing (Dangerous Music)

5) Madlib Medicine Show No. 13: Black Tape (Madlib Medicine Show)

Thanks to Michelle at the San Francisco Amoeba Music store for this week's new hip-hop chart which, with the exception of Drake's steadily selling sophomore album Take Care which was released four months ago, is packed with all brand new releases that dropped last week on Feb 28th. These include the number album of the week at the Haight Street store and the number 3 Billboard albums chart across the country this week: the self titled album from WZRD which is the highly anticipated and slightly overdue new new rock project from Kid Cudi along with producer Dot da Genius which draws inspiration from Pink Floyd and The Pixies.  and featuring songs like "The Upper Room " and "The Dream Time Machine" - both of which are below. Note this is technically not hip-hop music but rather more alternative/prog/rock music made by a rapper. I stress that because there's already been a lot of Cudi fans (ones used to his genre-bending) who are not feeling this album. But even if you are not you are not into the music you gotta give the guy props for always trying new things.

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Black History Month Leap Year Review: the Good, the Sad & the Bizarre

Posted by Billyjam, March 2, 2012 11:40am | Post a Comment

Among the "good" of this year's Black History Month was Robert Glasper's excellent
Black Radio album on Blue Note released Feb 28th, 2012


Maybe it's because this is a leap year that Black History Month 2012, which ended two days ago, seemed a little out of whack. Or maybe it was because it was a Black History Month that started on a really bad note when, on the morning of Feb 1st, the tragic news that Don Cornelius of Soul Train fame had taken his own life was the first thing we were to read about. That was bad enough but this tragic news came hot on the heels of the world losing a string of other black music/cultural icons, including in just the preceding two weeks both Etta James and JImmy Castor.  And then, of course, ten days later, on the eve of the Grammys, the whole world was taken aback with the shocking news that Whitney Houston had died at age 48. Not exactly a great time to joyously celebrate black history!

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RIP, Magnolia Shorty

Posted by Eric Brightwell, December 22, 2010 06:10pm | Post a Comment

Magnolia Shorty
was a bounce rapper from New Orleans who was the first female MC to record with Cash Money Records. She was murdered along with Jerome “Man Man” Hampton on the morning of December 20th, 2010 in Little Woods, New Orleans East. After being hit with a rumored 26 gun shots, their vehicle crashed on the 6300 block of Bridgehampton around 12:30 p.m. She was 28, Hampton was 25.
Renetta Lowe wanted to rap since she was six years old. She was nicknamed Magnolia Shorty by Magnolia Slim (aka Solja Slim) due to her diminutive stature and roots in Uptown’s notorious Magnolia Projects, which also produced rappers Juvenile, Mr. Marcello, 6-Shot and others.

She began rapping publicly when she was twelve, performing at block parties and recording mixtapes. When she signed with Cash Money, she was the first female rapper (and second female, following singer Ms. Tee) to join the label’s ranks. Her sole album for the label, recorded in 1996, is also notable for being the first Cash Money release to feature Juvenile. Not only was Monkey on the D$ck (Cash Money), released in February, 1997, Magnolia Shorty’s last album for the label, but sadly, it was her last album ever. In an era and scene known for bizarre album covers, Monkey on the D$ck’s image of to be-thonged girls with bullet braces and war helmets facing a large, irradiating, disembodied chimpanzee visage is on a level of bizarreness all by itself. Befitting the rapper’s stature, the album is itself incredibly short – just 21 minutes long and, as with many of Cash Money’s independent-era records, sounds like it was recorded in a single, lazy afternoon. The album's opener, “Manny Fresh (Cash Money Style)” doesn’t even feature her. There’s also a radio version of  “Monkey on the D$ck,” another bounce classic, “Charlie Whop!!,”  the wordless “Soldier Chant,” and “Magnolia $horty” (featuring BG and Juvenile).

Cash Money Records - The Independent Years (1991-1998)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 31, 2009 11:25pm | Post a Comment

Check out our selection of Cash Money Records titles on Amoeba.com!

By now, anyone that reads this blog and is a fan of the many, great New Orleans labels that sprouted in the fertile hip-hop delta back in the '90s may've wondered why no Cash Money thusfar. Well, I've been working on it but the greatest of labels required a lot of work.
Cash Money Records Independent Logo Hope you enjoy... wodie.

Back in the 1980s, the New Orleans Rap scene began to take root with early rappers like Tim Smooth, Warren Mayes, Ninja Crew and New York Incorporated all making noise. The latter act featured Mia X, Denny D, DJ Wop and Mannie Fresh and was probably the first rap group in the city. After their dissolution, Fresh hooked up with former Ninja Crew member Gregory D and they released a handful of influential, if not very widely promoted records.

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Big Boy Records

Posted by Eric Brightwell, June 16, 2009 08:53pm | Post a Comment
For several years in the '90s, before Master P moved to New Orleans and gobbled up most of the talent Big Boy Records logoof the legendary Parkway Pumpin, Big Boy Records was one of the main creative and commercial rivals to uptown's fledgling Cash Money. Over the course of the next few years, they released some of New Orleans' indisputably finest (and under-recognized) bounce and rap music. They also got caught up in all-consuming rivalry with Cash Money that raged in tit-for-tat diss songs while at the same time many of their stars departed for bigger labels. When Cash Money and No Limit signed multi-million dollar deals with major labels, Big Boy floundered, only to be reborn years later on a smaller scale,

Big Boy Records
was founded by Charles "Big Boy" Temple and the talented producer, Leroy "Precise" Edwards, who was responsible for most of the varied but always warm, solid and organic sounds. Others involved in the production were " David "D-Funk" Faulk and Brian "Big Bass" Gardner.

1993
Big Boy's first signee was pioneering New Orleans raper Sporty T (Terence Vine). The Gentilly resident had previously been a founding member of The Ninja Crew -- New Orleans's first rap group to record. In the early '90s, inspired by hits by Juvenile and Everlasting Hitman's bounce hits, he moved in that  direction as well. The label's first single was "Sporty Talkin' Sporty." Though bounce, it had an uncharacteristically heavy sound for the genre. After it sold 4,000 copies, Big Boy sought out more talent.

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