Amoeblog

Music History Monday: December 31

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 31, 2012 11:20am | Post a Comment

Donna SummerTo read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day, December 31, 1948 - Singer/songwriter Donna Summer (born LaDonna Adrian Gaines in Boston, MA). Happy Birthday to this Disco and R&B legend on what would have been her 64th Birthday. We love and miss you, Donna!!

 


On this day in music history: December 31, 1966 - "I'm A Believer" by The Monkees hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for seven weeks. Written by Neil Diamond, it is the second chart topping single for "The Pre-Fab Four." Producer Jeff Barry will find the song while also working with Diamond. The track is recorded in New York City on October 15, 1966. The Monkees will record their vocals at RCA Victor, Studio B in Hollywood on October 23rd. Issued as the follow up to the group's first hit, "Last Train To Clarksville," it is an immediate smash. "I'm A Believer" will have an advanced order of 1,051,280 copies, the highest amount for any RCA recording artist since Elvis Presley. Entering the Hot 100 at #44 on December 10th, it will leap frog to the top just three weeks later, with the single going gold only two days after its release and becoming the biggest selling single of 1967. The B-side "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone" written and produced by Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart will also chart, peaking at #20 on the Hot 100 on January 14, 1967.
 

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Obi 2

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 31, 2008 11:25pm | Post a Comment
Main Entry:
obi 
Pronunciation:
ˈō-bē
Function:
noun
Etymology:
Japanese
Date:
1876
: a broad sash worn especially with a Japanese kimono

OK, part 2 of our trip through Obiland begins with a Boston classic, along with its promo sticker sheet...



A trio of 80's classics. I'm sorry, but Pete Burns was always scary...


 
This Al Kooper Obi was used in a series of albums related to him via production and such...

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Return to Casablanca

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 3, 2008 11:30pm | Post a Comment


Not sure if short lived subsidiary "American International Records" is the same as the "A.I.R." from the late 60's, but it's very likely.  The studio 54 comp had this custom jobber and the final image is a great example of the classic early Casablanca blue label design...



When studying the classic desert scene design, one will begin to notice many variations. Here's an interesting trio...A later period label, with mention of Polygram at the bottom.  Middle label bears the Fauves-Puma Records imprint, a pairing that was reported to have moved some 15 million units on this Santa Esmeralda hit!! Finally, the classic desert scene from the Village People's heyday, before "Can't Stop the Music" nearly did...



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Welcome to Casablanca Records

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, February 29, 2008 12:30pm | Post a Comment


1980 saw the Casablanca release of Tony Joe White's The Real Thang album, which contained the amazing track "I Get Off On It", in which he discusses various individuals and their predilections--  junk food, trannys, trenchcoat flashers, bondage. Combine with a couple of other album highlights "Disco Blues" & the disco-ized version of "Even Trolls Love Rock and Roll", add copious amounts of cocaine and you've pretty much 'crystallized' the Casablanca Records story. 1980 was also the year that Polygram final squeezed Casablanca's founder out of the picture.  Neil Bogart went on to put together Boardwalk Entertainment, signing Joan Jett.  He also signed Get Wet -- if anyone out there knows what the Lou Reed connection is with them, please chime in. Anyhow, Mr. Bogart's body gave out on him 2 years later.