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Amoeba Curates January Red Bull Sound Select Show With Rapper Dizzy Wright

Posted by Amoebite, December 28, 2015 01:42pm | Post a Comment

red bull sound select dizzy wrightAmoeba is curating the next L.A. Red Bull Sound Select show on Jan. 7 with rapper Dizzy Wright.

The show takes place at the Bootleg Theater, and it’s $3 with an RSVP or $12 at the door. The show is 21+, and doors are at 8 p.m. The first 50 fans in line will also receive $10 Amoeba gift certificates.

Dizzy Wright grew up in Las Vegas and released several mixtapes before being signed to independent label Funk Volume, which released his debut studio album, SmokeOut Conversations, in 2012. This year, he released his sophomore album, The Growing Process, which reached No. 47 on the U.S. Billboard Chart and featured an appearance by one of his inspirations, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony. Wright also has said that a project with rapper Logic is in the works.

Watch his video for “Floyd Money Mayweather” below:

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TECHNO IS BLACK!

Posted by Mike Battaglia, February 2, 2009 11:00am | Post a Comment
       Larry Levan at the Paradise Garage        Ron Hardy at the Music Box

Even five short years ago, many clubbers, ravers and dance music fans would be hard pressed to recognize the names Ron Hardy or Larry Levan (above, R-L), let alone acknowledge African American influence on the music they get freaky to on the weekends. Even in the black community, whole generations seem The legendary Paradise Garagecompletely oblivious to this part of their musical heritage. Thankfully, that's changing. With a renewed interest in disco, 80's uptempo R&B aka boogie, techno and early house music over the past few years, knowledge of dance music's history and the role blacks (and gays and latinos) played in its inception is growing. Nightclubs where the music was allowed to evolve, like Levan's Paradise Garage (right) in New York, Hardy's Music Box and Frankie Knuckles' Warehouse in Chicago (the latter being where the name House Music was coined) and Detroit's Music Institute remain legendary not because of the venues themselves or the people who owned them, but due to the DJ's who made those places immortal by performing an aural alchemy that transformed the American soundscape.

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