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Music History Monday: December 16

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 16, 2013 09:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Remembering dance music icon Sylvester (born Sylvester James in Los Angeles, CA) - September 6, 1947 - December 16, 1988.
 


On this day in music history: December 16, 1966 - "Hey Joe", the debut single by The Jimi Hendrix Experience is released (US release is on May 1, 1967). Written by Billy Roberts, the song tells the story of a man on the run after shooting his wife for her infidelity. A garage band standard, it is covered by numerous acts including The Leaves, The Byrds, Love, The Standells, and The Surfaris to name a few. Hendrix's version is recorded on October 23, 1966 at De Lane Lea Studios in London. The single is first offered to Decca Records in the UK who decline to release it. Polydor will pick it up for UK release (and Reprise in the US) and it will immediately hit the charts. "Hey Joe" will peak at #6 on the UK singles chart.
 


On this day in music history: December 16, 1972Across 110th Street - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack is released. Produced by Bobby Womack, it is recorded at American Sound Studios in Memphis, TN from Spring - Fall 1972. Issued as the soundtrack to the blaxploitation crime drama starring Anthony Quinn, Yaphet Kotto, and Antonio Fargas, it features a song score written and produced by Bobby Womack and is performed by Womack and his backing band Peace. It also features the instrumental score from the film written by J.J. Johnson. The title song will be issued as a single and will peak at #19 on the Billboard R&B singles chart and #56 on the Hot 100. It will also be featured in director Quentin Tarantino's film Jackie Brown in 1997 and in American Gangster in 2007. Across 110th Street - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack will peak at #6 on the Billboard R&B album chart and #50 on the Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: March 4

Posted by Jeff Harris, March 4, 2013 11:00am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: March 4, 1944 - Legendary R&B singer, songwriter, and musician Bobby Womack (born Robert Dwayne Womack in Cleveland, OH).

Happy 69th Birthday, Bobby!!

 


On this day in music history: March 4, 1967 - "Ruby Tuesday" by The Rolling Stones hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it is the fourth chart-topping single for the British rock band. Richards will come up with initial idea for the song, writing it in a Los Angeles hotel room in early 1966 while the band are in the city recording tracks for their album Aftermath. The song is based on a groupie Richards knows and his then girlfriend, Linda Keith. Jagger will write most of the lyrics including the songs' chorus. The Stones will record "Ruby Tuesday" at Olympic Studios in London on November 8, 1966 with additional overdubs recorded on December 3rd. Guitarist Brian Jones will also play the recorder on the song, giving it its distinctive baroque sound. "Ruby" is originally released as the B-side of "Let's Spend The Night Together" in January of 1967. When American radio stations feel that the former song is "too suggestive" for airplay, DJ's will flip the single over and play "Ruby Tuesday" instead. Entering the Hot 100 at #78 on January 21, 1967, it will speed to the top of the chart six weeks later. Certified Gold in the US by the RIAA, "Ruby Tuesday" will be added to US LP pressings of The Rolling Stones' next album Between The Buttons when it is released on February 11th.
 

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10 Records You May Have Missed in 2012

Posted by Billy Gil, January 11, 2013 01:39pm | Post a Comment

We’ve already done our fair share of end-of-the-year lists, but with all the hooplah about Kendrick Lamar this and Beach House that, we were bound to miss a few records that some of us really loved. Below are 10 you can download from Amoeba.com.

 

Iris Dement - Sing The Delta

Iris DeMent$9.98

Dement’s woozy voice and salt-of-the-earth lyrics have please roots country fans for years, and in 2012 she released one of her best collections yet, Sing the Delta. She can sing a blues ballad to break your heart (“Before the Colors Fade”) or a rollicking country rocker (“The Night I Learned How Not to Pray”) with equal ease, her voice carrying a remarkable tone that pierces through like a biting wind chill.

 

 

 

 

Bobby Womack - The Bravest Man In The Universe

Bobby Womack$9.98

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Milo Greene Set to Play Amoeba With Live Webcast As Debut Record Lands

Posted by Billy Gil, July 15, 2012 04:00pm | Post a Comment
Milo GreeneMilo Greene is British. He’s well-dressed — three-piece suit and the like. He’s incredibly confident and charming, he’s well-spoken, he’s an intellectual, but also a man’s man. He’s exactly six feet tall to the millimeter, and if he were a dad, he’d be the No. 1 dad.
 
Milo Greene the man also isn’t real — they are a band, not a dude. He’s a fictional character band member Robbie Arnett invented when forming the band with Andrew Heringer. When contacting venues, Milo Greene would send the requests, and Arnett and Heringer saw their fortunes rise accordingly, getting better shows.
 
Now a five-piece who’ve taken the moniker Milo Greene as their own, in a bit of Belle & Sebastian-style alluring bewilderment, is set to release its debut, self-titled record July 17. The band plays Amoeba Hollywood the same day, at 7 p.m. with a live webcast.
 
milo greene milo greeneThe L.A.-based band’s debut record, Milo Greene, offers the same sort of intimate harmonies and natural harmonies of a Fleet Foxes or, further back, Fleetwood Mac just as Stevie and Lindsay joined the band. Written in part in a cabin in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and recorded with co-producer Ryan Hadlock (Ra Ra Riot, Blonde Redhead, The Gossip, The Lumineers) at Bear Creek Studio, a converted early 1900s barn in the country outside of Seattle, it’s a beautifully crafted set of songs that makes the most the band’s five-person set-up. They offer lush harmonies on songs like “Don’t You Give Up On Me,” which sounds like a gorgeous gospel intervention. Lone girl Greener Marlana Sheetz in particular stands out on songs like “Perfectly Aligned,” in which Sheetz’s testimonial vocals are wrapped in just the right amount of gauzy reverb while the boys (who include Graham Fink and Curtis Marrero, in addition to Arnett and Heringer) back her up with swaying folk-rock, along with electric swells of sound and strident harmonies when necessary. The whole thing’s, you know, perfectly aligned.
 
I sat down to talk with Fink about what it’s like to be in a folk band in L.A. in 2012, and what records and songs are doing it for him these days (Hint: Lots of ’90s R&B).
 
Me: Truthfully it was a bit hard to find out more about you guys, and along with the whole “Milo Greene” concept, it seems to me sort of an early Belle & Sebastian situation where you want the music to stand for itself and not for any member of the collective to stand out. Is that fair to say?
 
Fink: Absolutely. This is a very collective group, and the music has always stood at the forefront. We liked the idea of just releasing some live videos early, so people could see the five of us in a room, making music. No lead singer, no gloss, music first and foremost. That being said, I'm really trying to get famous so I can be gifted courtside Clippers tickets.

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Bobby Womack Comes to Amoeba

Posted by Billy Gil, June 12, 2012 07:30pm | Post a Comment
Bobby WomackSoul legend Bobby Womack is appearing this Friday, June 15th at Amoeba Hollywood at 6 p.m. where he’ll be signing copies of his excellent new album, The Bravest Man in the Universe, which is out today.

Produced by former Gorillaz and Blur frontman Damon Albarn as well as XL Recordings founder Richard Russell, on Womack’s first album of new material since 1994’s Resurrection, to say he sounds reinvigorated would be an understatement. Albarn, and Russell’s careful but not overly cautious production work helps Womack stand front-and-center over trip-hoppy beats and beatific synths. Womack cries out on “Sweet Baby Mine” like a man reborn. The title track, meanwhile, begins elegiac, as Womack extols the virtue of forgiveness, before breaking into a steady, string-laden groove that lets Womack do his thing with minimal distraction. A duet with Lana del Rey, “Dayglo Reflection,” is a bit of young-meets-old fun, but it’s still classy, with del Rey’s sultry voice breaks nicely complementing Womack’s rough hues. The headturner here, though, is closer “Jubilee (Don’t Let Nobody Turn You Around).” Womack is on fire as he sings in terrifying ecstasy over a big, nasty synth groove. The album is an excellent restatement from one of rock’s great survivors, and gives Womack a brilliant new palette from which to paint.

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