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Rest In Peace Soul Legend Bobby Womack

Posted by Billyjam, June 28, 2014 06:56am | Post a Comment

Bobby Womack "Across 100th Street" on Soul Train (1973)

 
Following several hours of unconfirmed online reports yesterday, it was finally confirmed in the early evening by his publicist that soul legend Bobby Womack had died Friday at the age of 70. What makes this news all the more shocking is that Womack had just performed two weeks ago at the Bonnaroo Music Festival. Although no exact cause of death was announced, the soul-singing great, who will be remembered for such hits as his own "Across 110th Street" and The Rolling Stones' hit "It's All Over Now" (which he wrote), had suffered numerous ailments in recent years including colon cancer, pneumonia, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease.

The Ohio-born Womack, who five years ago was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, had enjoyed a long career with a resurgence in popularity that began thanks in large part to fan Quentin Tarantino choosing the 1972 hit "Across 110th Street" as the opening theme song for his film Jackie Brown. For those who don't already have any Bobby Womack in their collections, recommended releases by the artist include the 2012 reissue release Across 110th Street-40th Anniv (CD) and the 11 track Icon series collection release Icon - The Best Of Bobby Womack (CD) that includes such gems as "Woman's Gotta Have It," "That's The Way I Feel About Cha," and "Across 100th Street."
 

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Music History Monday: December 16

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 16, 2013 09:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Remembering dance music icon Sylvester (born Sylvester James in Los Angeles, CA) - September 6, 1947 - December 16, 1988.
 


On this day in music history: December 16, 1966 - "Hey Joe", the debut single by The Jimi Hendrix Experience is released (US release is on May 1, 1967). Written by Billy Roberts, the song tells the story of a man on the run after shooting his wife for her infidelity. A garage band standard, it is covered by numerous acts including The Leaves, The Byrds, Love, The Standells, and The Surfaris to name a few. Hendrix's version is recorded on October 23, 1966 at De Lane Lea Studios in London. The single is first offered to Decca Records in the UK who decline to release it. Polydor will pick it up for UK release (and Reprise in the US) and it will immediately hit the charts. "Hey Joe" will peak at #6 on the UK singles chart.
 


On this day in music history: December 16, 1972Across 110th Street - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack is released. Produced by Bobby Womack, it is recorded at American Sound Studios in Memphis, TN from Spring - Fall 1972. Issued as the soundtrack to the blaxploitation crime drama starring Anthony Quinn, Yaphet Kotto, and Antonio Fargas, it features a song score written and produced by Bobby Womack and is performed by Womack and his backing band Peace. It also features the instrumental score from the film written by J.J. Johnson. The title song will be issued as a single and will peak at #19 on the Billboard R&B singles chart and #56 on the Hot 100. It will also be featured in director Quentin Tarantino's film Jackie Brown in 1997 and in American Gangster in 2007. Across 110th Street - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack will peak at #6 on the Billboard R&B album chart and #50 on the Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: March 4

Posted by Jeff Harris, March 4, 2013 11:00am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: March 4, 1944 - Legendary R&B singer, songwriter, and musician Bobby Womack (born Robert Dwayne Womack in Cleveland, OH).

Happy 69th Birthday, Bobby!!

 


On this day in music history: March 4, 1967 - "Ruby Tuesday" by The Rolling Stones hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it is the fourth chart-topping single for the British rock band. Richards will come up with initial idea for the song, writing it in a Los Angeles hotel room in early 1966 while the band are in the city recording tracks for their album Aftermath. The song is based on a groupie Richards knows and his then girlfriend, Linda Keith. Jagger will write most of the lyrics including the songs' chorus. The Stones will record "Ruby Tuesday" at Olympic Studios in London on November 8, 1966 with additional overdubs recorded on December 3rd. Guitarist Brian Jones will also play the recorder on the song, giving it its distinctive baroque sound. "Ruby" is originally released as the B-side of "Let's Spend The Night Together" in January of 1967. When American radio stations feel that the former song is "too suggestive" for airplay, DJ's will flip the single over and play "Ruby Tuesday" instead. Entering the Hot 100 at #78 on January 21, 1967, it will speed to the top of the chart six weeks later. Certified Gold in the US by the RIAA, "Ruby Tuesday" will be added to US LP pressings of The Rolling Stones' next album Between The Buttons when it is released on February 11th.
 

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Pan-American Blues -- Black Country

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 27, 2013 06:32pm | Post a Comment

If one listens to a “hillbilly” record like, say, Jimmie Rodgers’s “Blue Yodel” back-to-back with a “race” record like Lead Belly’s “Cow Cow Yiki” it should become immediately clear to the listener that often the distinction between these two genres has for many years been (and continues to be) more of an industry marketing rather than musicological one. After decades of segregation, one needn’t watch the CMT Music Awards to know that Country music has for a long time been almost totally dominated by white performers. However, there have always been black country musicians and more continue to emerge. Whether or not they're embraced by the Nashville industry or public is another question.



WHAT YOU KNOW ABOUT THE DIRTY SOUTH?

To Americans for whom there are only two coasts (the East and West), the South is with tiresome regularity portrayed and imagined to be a homogeneous region populated entirely by menacing, toothless, racist rednecks (whereas the North is totally free of racists, naturally). If these regionalist haters ever bothered to explore the South they’d likely be surprised by the physical and cultural variety of the Appalachians, the Delta, the Deep South, the Old South, the Ozarks, the Piedmont, the Upper South, the cities and countryside and so on. It would probably surprise many of them to learn that almost every single county in the country with a majority black population is located in the South since they imagine everyone there to be a white Republican.

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10 Records You May Have Missed in 2012

Posted by Billy Gil, January 11, 2013 01:39pm | Post a Comment

We’ve already done our fair share of end-of-the-year lists, but with all the hooplah about Kendrick Lamar this and Beach House that, we were bound to miss a few records that some of us really loved. Below are 10 you can download from Amoeba.com.

 

Iris Dement - Sing The Delta

Iris DeMent$9.98

Dement’s woozy voice and salt-of-the-earth lyrics have please roots country fans for years, and in 2012 she released one of her best collections yet, Sing the Delta. She can sing a blues ballad to break your heart (“Before the Colors Fade”) or a rollicking country rocker (“The Night I Learned How Not to Pray”) with equal ease, her voice carrying a remarkable tone that pierces through like a biting wind chill.

 

 

 

 

Bobby Womack - The Bravest Man In The Universe

Bobby Womack$9.98

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