Amoeba Bay Area & Amoeba Hollywood Share Their Top 5 In-Stores of 2016 (So Far)

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, August 8, 2016 05:32pm | Post a Comment

We're a little past the half-way mark of 2016 already, so it seemed like a perfect time to reflect upon the fantastic in-store shows we've put on at all three of our Amoeba locations: San Francisco, Berkeley, and Hollywood. Each and every live performance we present at our stores is a unique and thrilling experience for the audience and staff, but some shows just have that extra bit of magic to make them stand out as our favorites. Enjoy our lists of top five in-store shows of 2016 (so far)!

Amoeba Bay Area: San Francisco & Berkeley

The Mystery Lights at Amoeba SF: July 31, 2016
Every so often we book a band right before or just as they explode onto the scene in a big way. Although The Mystery Lights has put out a couple of releases since 2009, the NY-by-way-of-Salinas, California band just released their self-titled debut on Daptone Records' new subsidiary Wick and it's gaining momentum. Their sound is sinister garage - the darker side of the '60s Nuggets, Pebbles, and Back From The Grave comps. Think the proto-punk of The Seeds, The Sonics, Jesters of Newport. Unlike many garage rock revivalists, The Mystery Lights don't just recreate the sound; these guys channel it spiritually, putting on a raucous show led by the howling, jumping, guitar-wielding Mike Brandon.

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New "What's in My Bag?" Episode with Band of Horses

Posted by Amoebite, July 25, 2016 06:26pm | Post a Comment

Band of Horses Ameoba Music What's In My Bag?

Let it be known that South Carolina rockers Band of Horses are a very well read bunch of guys. Before their recent performance at Amoeba Hollywood the group scoured the store for records, movies, and a healthy selection of books, including the think piece, Fuck That: An Honest Meditation. "You know, just stuff that you would read on the toilet," says bassist Bill Reynolds. Reynolds also picked up autobiographies by two of his favorite bassists, Lemmy Kilmister of Motorhead and Duff McKagen of Guns N' Roses. Drummer Creighton Barrett found a copy of Sounds Of Two Eyes Opening, a photo book of Southern California surf/skate/punk culture, and lead guitarist Tyler Ramsey grabbed The Record Store of the Mind by Tompkins Square Records owner Josh Rosenthal. But it wasn't all books (for the loo or otherwise) with the band. They also found an incredible collection of records and rock documentaries.

Band of Horses formed in 2004 after the dissolution of vocalist/guitarist Ben Bridwell's previous band, Carissa's Wierd. Early on in their career, the band opened for Iron & Wine in their then-hometown of Seattle, drawing the attention of Sub Pop, who would release Band of Horses' 2006 full-length debut, Band of Horses Why Are You OKEverything All the Time. For the band's follow-up, Cease to Begin, Bridwell and the others relocated to South Carolina. The group's international profile began to grow, with performances at the Roskilde, Glastonbury, and T in the Park festivals.

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27 Awesome Sub Pop Albums

Posted by Billy Gil, January 16, 2015 04:00pm | Post a Comment


We’re still a few years shy of the 30-year anniversary of legendary indie label Sub Pop, which started in 1988. But why wait? We’re calling out 27 of our favorite Sub Pop albums that you can download now on Browse all of Sub Pop’s catalog that we have available here.

Mudhoney Superfuzz Bigmuff [Deluxe Edition] (1988)

mudhoney superfuzz bigmuffTogether with Mudhoney’s early singles, this is one of the earliest and most potent statements of the grunge movement, including the eternal “Touch Me, I’m Sick.”


Nirvana Bleach [Deluxe Edition] (1989)

nirvana bleachObvi.

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Rock the Vote With Amoeba!

Posted by Billy Gil, September 27, 2012 02:59pm | Post a Comment
Amoeba is helping to sign voters up before the Oct. 22 deadline to register or change your address information. You can register here if you haven't yet registered to vote in the Nov. 6 election, or Amoeba has voter registration forms at the stores you can pick up and we’ll mail it for you. Visit Rock The Vote for more voter information.

Murs & Fashawn at Amoeba HollywoodAs part of Amoeba's Rock the Vote effort, Murs & Fashawn and Band of Horses turned out excellent live shows at Amoeba Hollywood and across the street at Space 15 Twenty. Murs & Fashawn's energetic live show, which was streamed live for a webcast on, drew a huge crowd, thanks to Living Legends member Murs’ loyal fanbase, Fashawn’s rising notoriety and their recently released collaborative album, the fine This Generation. The duo performed songs from the album, such as the uplifting “Heartbreaks & Handcuffs,” trading rhymes and pointing to one another and generally having a great time riling up an enthusiastic crowd. Murs picked up a baby at one point like a politician, remarking that there were a lot of babies in the audience, which there were, along with teenagers who shouted suggestions to Murs and clamored over one another to pick up free T-shirts they threw into the audience (one jumped on my head!). “If you’re smart, you’ll be registered to vote and to get married by the time you leave here,” Murs said at one point. “If a girl’s at our show, she’s probably pretty cool.” Later, Murs more pointedly said: “It doesn’t hurt to believe in something a little bit. Don’t be so apathetic.”
murs fashawn this generation“As I got older and evolved as a person, I realized there’s a point [to voting],” Fashawn chimed in. “Today, I’m gonna register to vote.”

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Album Picks: Grizzly Bear, James Iha, Allah-Las, How to Dress Well, Plus More Albums Out Today

Posted by Billy Gil, September 17, 2012 05:23pm | Post a Comment
Grizzly BearGrizzly Bear – Shields

One of the year’s finest rock albums comes with Grizzly Bear’s Shields, improbably even even more consistent album than 2009’s excellent Veckatimest. Beginning with the soft explosion of “Sleeping Ute,” in which Daniel Rossen sings of his “wanderings dreams” amid regal electric guitars, fluttering synths and acoustics, Chris Taylor’s grounding basslines and Chris Bear’s dynamic drumwork, Shields continues through a back-and-forth between the more immediate pop thrills of Veckatimest and more ambient feel of their older material. “Speak in Rounds” has the same sort of glorious harmonies we heard on “While You Wait for the Others” but with more rock propulsion than the band usually employs. Meanwhile, tracks like the wordless “Adelama” and slowly shuffling “The Hunt” highlight their placid side. But Shields is also a progression of their sound in addition to a refinement of it. “Yet Again” scales back the grabbiness of an older song like “Two Weeks” for a lushly expansive take on the rock single, perhaps showing some influence from Radiohead, with whom they toured a few years back in a dream bill. Similarly extended and confident, “A Simple Answer” is one of Daniel Rossen’s finest showcases to date, building on his typically mysterious melodies to a gratifying, grandiose chorus. An addictive listen, it’s easy to lose yourself in the layers of Shields and find something newly impressive each time.
james ihaJames Iha – Look to the Sky
Anyone who’s been a big Smashing Pumpkins fan knows the pleasures the Pumpkins’ “George Harrison” could bring with his subtle guitarwork and gorgeous songs like “Go,” “Blew Away” and “Take Me Down.” Fourteen years after his first solo album released while still in the Pumpkins, James Iha is back with a fuller sound that capitalizes both on his folky Neil Young-inspired leanings and his ability to create spectral space rock soundscapes. Both qualities are in full flair on the beautiful “To Who Knows Where,” which features a typically beautiful Iha chorus and an awesome space-folk breakdown in the middle. Classic Pumpkins fans can find plenty to sink their teeth into in songs like “Gemini,” which moves from eerie folk to swoony big-chord rock. Elsewhere, he breaks from his past more decisively, as on the ’60s by way of ’80s pop “Till Next Tuesday” and the addled blues of “Appetite,” moments that show Iha has more tricks up his sleep than at first appears. Some of his folkier tracks veer toward sappy, but Iha’s smart production, learned from the interim years of producing for acts like Cat Power and Isobel Campbell as well as various remixes, usually saves things with orchestral flourishes and surprises like the twinkling synths that pop up at the end of the Karen O duet “Waves.” It’s an assured work that speaks to the talents of Iha as a guitarist, producer and songwriter who knows how to paint wonders from a modest palette.

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