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Music History Monday: March 10

Posted by Jeff Harris, March 10, 2014 09:15am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: March 10, 1903 - Jazz music icon Bix Beiderbecke (born Leon Bismark Beiderbecke in Davenport, IA). Happy Birthday to this legendary jazz cornetist, and one of the greatest musicians of the 20th century, born 111 years ago today, and taken far too young at the age of 28 on August 6, 1931.
 


On this day in music history: March 10, 1967I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You, the eleventh album by Aretha Franklin is released. Produced by Jerry Wexler, it is recorded at Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL and Atlantic Studios in New York City from January - February 1967. Following the immediate breakout success of the single "I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)," producer Jerry Wexler will call Franklin and the musicians she recorded with in Alabama to New York City in early February to quickly record an album to accompany it. Racing through a week's worth of  recording sessions, the album will be completed and prepared for release. A huge critical and commercial success upon its release, the album will provide Franklin with her long awaited commercial breakthrough, and will also establish her as a major force in the music industry. It will spin off two singles including "Respect" (#1 R&B and Pop) and the title track (#1 R&B, #9 Pop). I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You will spend 14 weeks at #1 (non-consecutive) on the Billboard R&B album chart, three weeks at #2 on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: January 20

Posted by Jeff Harris, January 20, 2014 10:40am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: January 20, 1964Meet The Beatles!, the second US album by The Beatles is released. Produced by George Martin, it is recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London from February 11 - October 23, 1963. Just after release of "I Want To Hold Your Hand," Capitol Records will quickly leap into action, rushing out the band's second US full-length LP, just ten days after Vee Jay Records releases Introducing... The Beatles. The twelve-track album consists nine songs from the band's second UK LP With The Beatles with "You Really Got a Hold On Me," "Devil in Her Heart," "Money (That's What I Want)," "Please Mister Postman," and "Roll Over Beethoven" removed and replaced with "I Want To Hold Your Hand" (#1 Pop), "I Saw Her Standing There" (#14 Pop), and "This Boy." The versions of "I Want To Hold Your Hand" and "This Boy" featured on the stereo pressing of the album will be presented in re-channeled "Duophonic" stereo, since no true stereo mixes had been made for either song. Both had been released as a stand alone single in the UK in mono only. The stereo mix of "I Saw Her Standing There" featured on the album differs from the one included on the Vee Jay Introducing...and the UK Please Please Me album. Capitol will also use the same cover photo (taken by photographer Robert Freeman), used for the With The Beatles album cover. Original mono and stereo copies of the album will be distinguished by the graphics on the front cover. Mono pressings (T-2047) will feature the band's name printed in tan or brown ink, with the stereo copies (ST-2047) featuring the "Capitol Full Dimensional Stereo" banner on the top, with the band's name also printed in tan or brown ink, with later copies using olive green ink. In spite of being a consistent seller over the years, Meet The Beatles will be deleted by Capitol (along with their other US compiled LP's) in 1987, when the band's original UK albums are issued in their place. The album will make its CD debut in November of 2004, when it is released as part of the box set The Capitol Albums, Volume 1. To commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of The Beatles arrival in the US, it will be reissued again as of the thirteen disc CD box set The U.S. Albums on January 21, 2014Meet The Beatles will spend 11 weeks at #1 on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 5x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Katey Sagal + Album Signing Event at Amoeba Hollywood Dec. 11

Posted by Amoebite, December 5, 2013 03:16pm | Post a Comment
Katey Sagal

For over two decades, Katey Sagal has reigned as one of television's most popular actors. She became an instant fan favorite as Peggy Bundy, the hilarious redheaded bombshell on Married...With Children. In the early 2000s, Sagal was pegged to play the voice of Turanga Leela, the one eyed mutant on Futurama. Today, Katey Sagal rules the television throne as Gemma Teller Morrow, the matriarch of The Sons of Anarchy, a role which earned Sagal a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Television Series Drama.

With all the acting accolades Katey has achieved, it's easy to overlook her first true talent: singing. In 1976, Sagal made her professional recording debut singing with The Group With No Name. TheKatey Sagal Covered band was signed to Neil Bogart's Casablanca Record label. She went on to sing backup for musical heavy hitters including Bob Dylan, Etta James, Bette Midler, Gene Simmons and Tanya Tucker. She has released three solo albums, most recently this year's Covered (E1Music). The new record finds Sagal covering some of her favorite songs, including Tom Petty's "Free Fallin'" and Jackson Browne's "For a Dancer." Sagal's vocal styling is rooted in Soul and Blues with a heavy singer-songwriter influence. She has also been featured on the Sons of Anarchy soundtracks. 

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Music History Monday: May 27

Posted by Jeff Harris, May 27, 2013 09:45am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.


Born on this day: May 27, 1957 - Punk and alternative music icon Siouxsie Sioux of Siouxsie & The Banshees and The Creatures (born Susan Janet Ballion in London, UK). Happy 56th birthday, Siouxsie!
 


On this day in music history: May 27, 1972 - "Oh Girl" by The Chi-Lites hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week, also topping the R&B singles chart for two weeks on June 3rd. Written and produced by Eugene Record, it is the biggest pop hit, and the second R&B chart topper for the Chicago based R&B quartet. Record will write and demo the song, then forget about it for a time. Producer and arranger Carl Davis will hear the demo and tell The Chi-Lites lead vocalist that he has a potential hit on his hands. Recorded at Universal Recording Studios in Chicago, the track is engineered by Bruce Swedien (Michael Jackson, Quincy Jones) and features Record playing bass and guitar on the track along with other members of Brunswick's regular rhythm section including Quinton Joseph (drums) and Tom Washington, aka "Tom Tom 84," (piano). Issued as a single on March 2, 1972, the song will receive a major boost when The Chi-Lites appear on comedian Flip Wilson's top rated comedy/variety program. At first the producers of the show will expect them to perform their recent hit "Have You Seen Her," but after hearing the brand new song, they'll change their minds and emphatically agree to the group's request to perform their new single for the first time on national television. Entering the Hot 100 at #80 on April 8, 1972, it will climb to the top of the chart seven weeks later, ending Roberta Flack's six week run at the top with "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face." "Oh Girl" will be certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: May 20

Posted by Jeff Harris, May 20, 2013 11:00am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: May 20, 1967 - "Groovin'" by The Young Rascals hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks (non-consecutive), also peaking at #3 on the R&B singles chart on the same date. Written by Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati, it is the second chart topping single for the New York City-based blue eyed soul/pop rock quartet. For the band's sixth single release, they will venture into new musical territory. Taking an interest in Afro-Cuban music, keyboardist and lead vocalist Cavaliere along with percussionist Brigati will come up with a leisurely paced groove with that sound in mind, and begin crafting a song around it. Lyrically, it will be about how the only time the two busy musicians could spend with their respective girlfriends was on Sundays. When they get into the studio to cut the track, they will enlist the assistance of veteran studio bassist Chuck Rainey to play on the song. Once it's completed, the band will present the song to Atlantic Records, who at first are unsure of the song's commercial potential. Famed New York DJ Murray "The K" will convince the label to release song after he expresses his enthusiasm for it. Released on April 10, 1967, it is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #79 on April 22, 1967, it will rocket to the top of the chart just four weeks later. "Groovin'" will prove to have major staying power once it reaches the summit. After two weeks at the top, it will be bumped from the #1 spot by Aretha Franklin's "Respect" for two weeks, then it will return to the top for an additional two weeks. "Groovin'" will be certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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