Amoeblog

New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Lance Henriksen at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Amoebite, March 13, 2013 11:58am | Post a Comment

Some of the coolest people visit us at Amoeba Hollywood. We had the utmost pleasure of hanging out with Sci Fi/Horror film fan favorite, Lance Henriksen. Many of you know Lance from his character Bishop, the Android he famously played in the Aliens films franchise. Lance hung out and shopped around for a few things. He's got some pretty interesting picks such as the classic French drama 400 Blows, and who would have guessed Lance digs Hip Hop? See for yourself!


Lance Henriksen - What's In My Bag?
Watch and comment on YouTube

 

Not only is Lance Henriksen a staple when it comes to awesome Science Fiction films, but he is now a bonafide comic book author! Henriksen and co-author Joseph Maddrey held a special signing at Amoeba Hollywood to unveil the 5 issue series, To Hell You Ride (DC Comics). To Hell You Ride starts off by introducing the character Two Dogs, a forgotten Native American plagued by booze and his disregard for society. Two Dogs is reawakened by the spirit of his ancestors and with their guidance he is led to avenge his land and his people. There's a flesh eating curse, mad scientists, and lots of bloddy horror. Tom Mandrake brings it all together with some amazing illustrations. It's a good one! The fans came out to support Lance and his new comic and everyone had a blast! If you missed all the fun you can check out some photos of the signing below.

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(In which we mine for some gold.)

Posted by Job O Brother, February 11, 2013 02:04pm | Post a Comment
counting sheep
Don't try this at (my) home.

I haven’t had a good night’s sleep in days; what sleep I have gotten is mostly thanks to the fine folks who make Motrin PM. (In the interest of full disclosure you should know that while McNeil Consumer Healthcare – makers of the aforementioned drug – are not a sponsor of the Amoeblog, they do give us free donuts on Mondays and occasionally wash our cars for an extra buck or two.)

While my Mom was kind enough to pass down to me a knack for cooking and robust health, I also inherited her tenuous sleeping habits. We deal with it similarly, too: we listen to the radio to keep our minds from, as she puts it:

“Going, going, going… just making plans and playing with ideas.”

Or, as I put it:

“Obliterating my peace of mind with the chaos and fury of post-traumatic stress fantasies catalyzed by a cruel and crippling world.”

It’s semantics, really.

Mom likes to treat this with AM radio, a favorite program being Coast to Coast. While this particular broadcast seems to promote a nightmarish reality of government conspiracy, alien invasion, body snatching and morally questionable fringe-sciences, she finds it delightful. That she does speaks to her unwavering trust in our fellow man and her willingness to believe everyone deserves to prove their innate goodness – even if, I suppose, it’s lizard-men from another planet who are covertly running our government.

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Heavy Midnites: James Cameron's ALIENS at The Cinefamily

Posted by phil blankenship, November 8, 2012 10:12pm | Post a Comment
James Cameron's ALIENS

ALIENS // Friday, November 9, 2012 // Midnite

Before tackling giant ocean liners or the future of 3D, James Cameron blasted out this masterpiece of technical marvel, high tension and peace through superior firepower. Sidestepping the horror focus of Ridley Scott’s first film, Aliens ratchets up the action, full-blooded machismo and mechanical fascination, all while cementing Sigourney Weaver as the female action hero of the ‘80s (garnering her an Oscar nomination and a Time magazine cover) and serving as a critique of America’s involvement in Vietnam. Jam-packed with a sci-fi dream team cast (Michael Biehn, Bill Paxton & Jenette Goldstein as badass space marines; Lance Henriksen as android Bishop; Paul Reiser as an oily corporate representative), thoroughly entertaining, eminently quotable and featuring an impressive array of physical visual effects (pre-CGI overload!), Aliens remains one of the most exciting adventures ever sent into space.Dir. James Cameron, 1986, 35mm, 137 min.

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RAP NEWS Tells Us What to Expect in 2012 (with Guests Noam Chomsky & Anonymous)

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 3, 2012 12:42pm | Post a Comment
Like your rap long, ponderous, and downright hilarious? Thanks to RAP NEWS (written and createdAnonymous, occupy, #occupy, occupy wall street, Rap News, 2012, Noam Chomsky by Hugo Farrant and Giordano Nanni in a home-studio in Melbourne, Australia), there's a constant stream of socio-politically relevant musical commentary addressing the global issues of today. Oh, and they wear funny wigs.

Their latest installment (episode 10) discusses the big one: 
2012!
What will happen? Will we see the poles shift or a paradigm shift? Will a rogue Sumerian planet smash into our solar system, plunging us into serfdom under the iron fist of a race of gold-hungry aliens? Or are the aliens already here? 

Bringing out the big guns -- Noam Chomsky and even an embodiment of Anonymous -- RAP NEWS crams in as many theories and arguments as possible about our impending end of days. Happy New Year!


-- Audra

Mighty White of You: Cowboys & Aliens (2011)

Posted by Charles Reece, August 29, 2011 02:49am | Post a Comment
In the realm of categories, black is always marked as a color [...], and is always particularizing; whereas white is not anything really, not an identity, not a particularizing quality, because it is everything -- white is no color because it is all colors. This property of whiteness, to be everything and nothing, is the source of its representational power.
-- p. 127, Richard Dyer's "White" from The Matter of Images


Reading Dyer's above quoted essay reminded me of the classic Saturday Night Live skit where Eddie Murphy went undercover as a white man to discover what whiteness is really like. He receives a free newspaper, gets cash from a bank without any credit and, once the city bus is free of minorities, the whites have a party. Instead of whiteness being the default or normative position from which every other ethnicity is otherness, Murphy's blackness is the norm and whiteness is seen as excess.

A less ironic and more recent example of what Dyer's getting at is the colorizing of Marvel's superheroes: Nick Fury is black in the films and Ultimate line; the Ultimate version of Peter Parker was killed off and replaced by a half black, half latino kid named Miles Morales; Kingpin was played by a black man in the Daredevil film; and more controversial among the Aryan supremacists was the decision to make the Norse god Heimdall black in the Thor film. The difference here between whiteness and otherness is that Peter Parker isn't first marked as white, second as Spider-Man, but Miles Morales is foremost a mixed ethnicity and secondly a superpowered human. If he were to live with his aunt at a near poverty level, that would be part of his ethnic narrative, whereas it's not really a part of Peter's being white. For Peter, those are qualities which merely help the audience sympathize with his struggle as an individual (they aren't anything but dramatic attributes within a particular narrative). The white narrative, through its dominance, seen as normative, is hidden, only revealed by contrast with what falls outside, or underneath.

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