Amoeblog

Music History Monday: January 13

Posted by Jeff Harris, January 13, 2014 12:12pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: January 13, 1962 - "The Twist" by Chubby Checker hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks. Written by Hank Ballard, it is the biggest hit for the Philadelphia-born singer (real name Ernest Evans). The song and massively popular dance will find popularity initially with teenagers when it is first released in 1960, hitting number one for one week in September of that year. A little over a year later, the dance will find renewed popularity with adults, putting the record back on the pop singles chart. Re-entering the Hot 100 at #55 on November 13, 1961, it will climb to the top of the chart eight weeks later. "The Twist" will be the only single in Billboard chart history to top the pop chart twice in two entirely separate chart runs.
 


On this day in music history: January 13, 1964The Times They Are A-Changin', the third album by bob dylan the times they are a-changinBob Dylan is released. Produced by Tom Wilson, it is recorded at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City from August 6 - October 31, 1963. Right on the heels of the successful and acclaimed The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, the prolific songwriter and musician will return to the studio a few months later to record the follow up. The album is Dylan's first to feature all original material written by him. The songs are more serious and are starkly arranged featuring Dylan accompanied only by his own acoustic guitar and harmonica playing. The album will yield some of his best known and loved songs including "North Country Blues" and the anthemic title track. The Times They Are A-Changin' will peak at #20 on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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Music History Monday: April 8

Posted by Jeff Harris, April 8, 2013 04:12pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: April 8, 1963 - Singer, songwriter, and musician Julian Lennon (born John Charles Julian Lennon in Liverpool, UK). Happy 50th Birthday, Julian!!
 


On this day in music history: April 8, 1975Toys In The Attic, the third album by Aerosmith is released. Produced by Jack Douglas (Cheap Trick, John Lennon), it is recorded at The Record Plant in New York City from January - March 1975. After working with Douglas on their previous album Get Your Wings, they will return to the studio with him in the Winter of 1975 to record the follow up. The end result will be the Boston-based rock bands' commercial breakthrough (and highest selling studio album) in the US, spinning off three singles including "Sweet Emotion" (#36 Pop) and "Walk This Way" (#10 Pop). "Walk" is initially issued as a single in August of 1975 and does not chart. It will be re-released in November of 1976 (following the successful Rocks album) and becomes their first top 10 hit. Toys In The Attic will peak at #11 on the Billboard Top 200 and is certified 8x Platinum by the RIAA.
 

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100 Famous Rock Guitar Riffs Offers Concise History of Rock N' Roll

Posted by Billyjam, July 17, 2012 10:00am | Post a Comment
      

Rock music has way too many incredibly memorable guitar riffs to limit a best of list to just one hundred, but the 100 riffs that guitarist Alex Chadwick of The Chicago Music Exchange came up with for the above video performance ain't half bad, and it is a nice informal overview of the history of rock n' roll. Sure it's a subjective selection that includes a lot of mega hits of the genre, and no doubt every rock fan could come up with their own unique list of a hundred best guitar riffs. But I like what Alex has done: from his playing to his choices of riffs, and from how he segues from song to song, to how he plays it on his 1958 Fender Strat all in chronological order. Below is that list of songs and artists in order with the artist names that are blue highlighted linking back to the Amoeba Online Store. where you can find their respective music (CDs, LPs, DVDs) including (in near all cases) the song played by Alex.

SONG/ARTIST PLAYLIST & AMOEBA SHOP LINK OF ALEX'S 100 GUITAR RIFFS (IN ORDER):


1 "Mr. Sandman"  Chet Atkins
2 "Folsom Prison Blues" Johnny Cash
3 "Words of Love"  Buddy Holly
4 "Johnny B Goode"  Chuck Berry
5 "Rumble"  Link Wray

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Amoeba Bloggers Answer: What Was Your First Album?

Posted by Billy Gil, March 6, 2012 07:09pm | Post a Comment
I recently was at Amoeba Hollywood and overheard a customer telling an employee Davy Jones had died. I hadn’t heard the news yet. She brought it up because she was buying Katy Perry records for her daughter. She said her daughter didn’t even have a record player — she just wanted every bit of Katy Perry merchandise she could get her hands on.
 
The only artist I can ever remember being that obsessive about was The Smashing Pumpkins, but that was in high school. But it got me thinking about those first tapes, records, singles etc. that everyone got as a kid.
 
ace of base the signFor me, the first album I ever bought on my own was Ace of Base’s The Sign on cassette. I had always liked music, but at 11, I had just started to pay attention to what songs were on the radio. A friend made me a tape from the radio and “The Sign” was on it. I loved it. In the coming weeks and months, albums by Nirvana, Guns N’ Roses, Stone Temple Pilots, Green Day, and my beloved Pumpkins would follow, but really it all started with Ace of Base for me. Though if I’m being technical, I had a cassette single of Paula Abdul’s “Promise of a New Day” that I listened to constantly when I was like 9, but I didn’t buy that — I won it at a cousin’s music-themed birthday party, at which my dad dressed himself and me as Simon & Garfunkel. I had no idea who they were. I think I was Paul Simon.
 
While I’m embarrassing myself, I thought I’d extend the question to the other Amoeba bloggers: What was your first album? Not kids’ music, but not just the cool stuff, either — the tapes we once listened to repeatedly and then put away in a drawer somewhere once we realized how lame they were, though I’m still on the hunt for The Sign on vinyl. Here are their answers:
 
Eric Brightwell
the cure kiss me kiss me kiss meMy first record was Luciano Pavarotti's My Own Story, a compilation of “musical highlights of his spectacular career.” They used to heavily advertise it on TV when I got home from school, and I was hooked. My first cassette was Peter Gabriel's So. I'd liked the singles from it, but when “Big Time” came out, I was obsessed. My first CD was The Cure’s Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me. I was introduced to it by a German exchange student named Ina. Before she left I rode my bike into town to a Wal-Mart to get a blank cassette to dub it. I loved it so much, I thought it warranted being purchased on CD. 
 


Somewhat Redundant

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, January 18, 2008 05:10pm | Post a Comment
Original album artwork, only smaller