Amoeblog

Celebrate 100 Years of Chaplin's Little Tramp with SF Silent Film Fest's Charlie Chaplin Centennial Celebration

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 16, 2013 06:17pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music is thrilled to join the San Francisco Silent Film Festival on January 11th at the Castro Charlie Chaplin The KidTheatre for a day-long centennial celebration of Charlie Chaplin's beloved "Little Tramp" character. Yes, 100 years ago the Little Tramp appeared in Kid Auto Races at Venice (1914), the funniest of the Keystone films that set the stage for Chaplin’s ascendancy as a star. This "little fellow," as Chaplin called him, became an icon of world cinema and catapulted Chaplin to fame.

SFSFF's celebration will feature three programs of Chaplin's indelible contribution to cinema. Three comedy shorts from Chaplin's time at the Mutual Film Corporation - The Vagabond (1916), The Cure (1917), and Easy Street (1917) - start the day off, with piano accompaniment by John Mirsalis. Chaplin's first feature, The Kid (1921) will be preceded by the aforementioned Kid Auto Races at Venice and accompanied by the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra conducted by Timothy Brock. Preceding The Kid, compete in the Charlie Chaplin Look-Alike contest! Come dressed as the Little Tramp and win a prize! The Gold Rush (1925) will also be accompanied by the Chamber Orchestra conducted by Brock. Timothy Brock is an acclaimed composer/conductor specializing in concert works of the early 20th-centure and silent films. He restored Chaplin's original scores for The charlie chaplin shortsKid and The Gold Rush.

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Posted by Job O Brother, March 30, 2009 03:55pm | Post a Comment
silent film

Not to lure you away from the safe and nurturing environment that is the Amoeblog, but, for those of you interested in reading it with your eyes, here is a link to a recent interview I had with one of my favorites, Marianne Faithfull.

Now then, on to a topic that is not oft spoke of; that is, silent films. Amoeba Music Hollywood has a small but rich silent film section which, at this writing, is located on the mezzanine. I’m taking this opportunity to advocate a greater appreciation and exploration of this antiquated genre.

For many people, silent films are a known but ignored craft, as though the technological progress that married sound to film rendered the silent precursors an inferior product. While I do hail “talkies” as a wonderful invention, I still feel there is much joy to be had in silent cinema. If nothing else, knowing a bit about it can be enough to get you laid by art-school chicks taking a break from experimenting with bisexuality.

louise brooks

The first silent I saw that rocked me was the tragic drama Pandora’s Box [original, German title: Die Büchse der Pandora]. Released in 1929 and directed by Austrian Georg Wilhelm Pabst, it stars the gorgeous and gifted Louise Brooks in the lead role.


Another gem I treasure is Wings, the first film to win an Academy Award for Best Picture (and the only silent film to do so). Released in 1927 and directed by William A. Wellman, it stars Clara Bow, the quintessential flapper icon, and has a cameo by not-yet-superstar Gary Cooper.