Amoeblog

of Montreal's New Video from Aureate Gloom, Upcoming RSD Release, + Select Tour Dates

Posted by Billyjam, March 12, 2015 04:53am | Post a Comment

Hot on the heels of the release last week of of Montreal's brand new album Aureate Gloom care of Polyvinyl (also available in vinyl format) the prolific Athens, GA indie band have unleashed a music video for the ten song album's opening track/lead single "Bassem Sabry" (named for the Egyptian journalist who tragically died in the spring of 2014). The stream of consciousness, photo-montage styled video clip (below) that was shot mostly on Super 8 film was directed by Ben Rouse who, in a statement about his approach to its production, said that "I tend to peg myself as a photographer, so in many ways this project was a really beautiful boot camp into an entirely new medium. It's my first music video...so it was a massive learning experience and chance to make something exciting and meaningful with our friends. I felt very inspired by Věra Chytilová's Daisies, Stan Brakhage's Mothlight, and Jean Cocteau's Le Sang d'un Poète."

Aureate Gloom, which is of Montreal's thirteenth full-length album, was recorded at Sonic Ranch studio which is just across the border from Juarez, Mexico in the Texan desert where the album recording was done old school style: recorded directly to tape. There, with the help of engineer Drew Vandenberg, Aureate Gloom was recorded by Clayton Rychlik (drums), Bob Parins (bass), Bennett Lewis (guitar), JoJo Glidewell (keys), and of course Kevin Barnes (guitar, vocals). Of the album's revelatory lyrics main writer Barnes, who founded the band in 1996 and pictured above c/o Chad Kamenshine, admitted that it indeed might be a case of TMI. "I might be guilty of sharing or exposing too much of my private life, but to me the best albums are those that help people connect with an artist on a deep, human level and that do so without too much artifice or evasiveness," he said in a statement noting that, "I was going through a very stormy period in my life and felt like I was just completely trashed."

Continue reading...

New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Fences

Posted by Amoebite, March 11, 2015 03:25pm | Post a Comment

Fences

Fences is the brainchild of Brockton, Massachusetts native Christopher Mansfield. In 2009, Mansfield released his debut EP, Ultimate Puke, online via his MySpace page. The songs caught the attention of Sara Quin of popular Canadian band Tegan & Sara. Quin later produced and contributed vocals to the debut full-length, Fences (2010). Mansfield has since collaborated with fellow Seattle artists Macklemore and Ryan Lewis both contributing to each other's projects. Mansfield co-wrote the song "10,000 Fences Lesser OceansHours" from Macklemore's break through hit record, The Heist.

Now part of the Elektra roster, Fences just released Lesser Oceans this week. Mansfield and his cohorts - guitarist Benjamin Greenspan, drummer Elliot Chaffee and bassist Lindsey Starr - deliver 10 perfectly written folk-pop songs with help from producers Ryan Lewis, Chris Walla and Jacquire King. Macklemore drops in for a guest rap verse on "Arrows" that works magically with the non-hip hop stylings of Fences. Mansfield has a knack for tapping into simple lyrics while still being entertaining and drawing in the listener. Conviction and emotion is what drives this stellar batch of songs. 

Continue reading...

Robben Ford Comes to The GRAMMY Museum March 30

Posted by Amoebite, March 11, 2015 10:23am | Post a Comment

rubben ford the grammy museum

Amoeba is proud to sponsor The Drop: Robben Ford on March 30 at The GRAMMY Museum.

The blues guitarist will appear for a discussion about his career and new album, Into the Sun, which is out March 31. Tickets are $20 and are on sale now. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. at The GRAMMY Museum's Clive Davis Theater.

Robben Ford has had an illustrious career in which he has collaborated with the likes of Miles Davis, Joni Mitchell, George Harrison and KISS. He's been nominated for five GRAMMYs and was named one of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of the 20th Century" by Musician magazine. His most recent solo albumm, 2014's A Day in Nashville, peaked at No. 2 on BIllboard's Top Blues Album chart. The upcoming Into the Sun features guest appearances by blues musician Keb' Mo', pedal steel guitarist Robert Randolph, singer/songwriter ZZ Ward, Warren Haynes of The Allman Brothers Band/Gov't Mule and many more into an album that fuses elements of jazz, pop, blues and rock.

Continue reading...

The Vinyl Frontier #4 - Collecting Black Gospel Music

Posted by Joe Goldmark, March 10, 2015 07:02pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

A friend said that gospel music was soul music for black folk and that mainstream soul music was music made for a white audience. The implication being that if you wanted to hear music with real soul, listen to gospel.
 

Fantastic Violinaires The Fantastic Violinaires with an incredible live version of “Children Are You Ready.”


Generally speaking, gospel reflected whatever musical trend was happening in R&B music. Gospel music was a little rougher and less polished than secular music, and of course the theme was religious, but otherwise it was relatively easy for artists to cross back and forth between the two styles. And besides, most black pop and soul artists grew up singing in the church.
 

Dorothy Love Coates and the Gospel Harmonettes Dorothy Love Coates and the Gospel Harmonettes, "Thats Enough."


 


The Staple Singers, Mavis Staples The Staple Singers with Mavis Staples on lead vocal, “Sit Down Servant.”

Continue reading...

Essential Records: Broadcast's 'Tender Buttons'

Posted by Billy Gil, March 10, 2015 05:07pm | Post a Comment

Essential Records Broadcast Tender Buttons

Defunct British duo Broadcast has most of their catalog reissued this week, including Tender Buttons. The band’s haunting third album is undoubtedly their high-water mark. Released in 2005, it slowly but surely raised the band’s profile, landing on several year-end best-of lists, drawing more attention to their previous albums and putting them at the upper echelon of independent artists, before their career was tragically cut short by the death of singer Trish Keenan.

I first heard Broadcast while perusing said year-end lists. (Also, wow to a list of albums so good that this is only No. 22; the early-to-mid-2000s are more than due for a resurgence.) But Broadcast’s tasteful oddity of an album somehow outlasts any other record made that year.

The key to Tender Buttons’ (and Broadcast’s) continuing endurance is how unassuming it is. Fourteen trim tracks (save five-minute noise piece “Arc of a Journey”) that actually sound like they were made by two people, using instruments that sound like they were found through a year’s worth of estate sales, Tender Buttons avoids sounding pretentious because it never really claims to be more than it is, Gertrude Stein references and all. It’s a record that remains mysterious even though all of its elements are basically at the forefront. Keenan’s vocals remain clarion despite getting plenty of the reverb treatment, thanks to her erudite British diction. All those moogs that sound like they’re falling apart, stitched together by James Cargill’s web-like guitarwork and pumping basslines, even those roaring in the background, you can pretty much hear it all, yet it feels like facing mirrors stretching to infinity, given the sense of space their layering allows.

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  >>  NEXT