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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: Dave Paul's 1990 KCSF Hip-Hop Top 40

Posted by Billyjam, January 13, 2015 05:44pm | Post a Comment


Following my uncovering a 25 year old KCSF San Francisco hip-hop playlist (above) from David Paul I invited the longtime Bay Area DJ/promoter/label CEO/publisher to be a guest Amoeblogger this week for the Hip-Hop History Tuesdays segment and to bring us back, via his memories, to that time period (March 1990) in the genre that historically sat smack in the middle of the so-called Golden Era of hip-hop. Here is what Dave Paul had to share about his playlist from a quarter century ago - some songs with accompanying videos.

Wow, seeing this playlist brings back memories. This was when I did a Friday radio show at KCSF (City College of San Francisco) from 8am to 2am every week. It wasn’t on radio waves but rather broadcast on cable TV, Viacom 25. March 15th, 1990 was way before I launched The Bomb Hip-Hop Magazine (that wouldn't be until October 1991). First, I’ll start with the songs that I am now embarassed that I played and charted at that time: "Shake The House" by Misa: she was a white girl rapper, way before Iggy Azelea. I probably played it cause Big Ed (Sleeping Bag/Fresh Records Bay Area rep) and DJ EFX (Mind Motion’s brother) mixed it. Then there's "Somebody Farted" by Bobby Jimmy.  I probably just found it funny. I guess when you’re in your early 20’s this is hilarious. Then we have "U Can’t Touch This" by MC Hammer. I have no excuse other than he was local (same with Oaktown 357 except "Juicy Gotcha Crazy" was catchy). Now onto the tracks that I am proud I was playing back then. Here they are with accompanying videos:

"Buddy" by De La Soul - this needs no line up. Native Tongues in da house!

Would You Like A Cheese Puff?: The Art Of The RCA SelectaVision Videodisc CED

Posted by Mark Beaver, January 13, 2015 04:20pm | Post a Comment
 For a brief moment in time (1981-1986, to be exact) there existed a film delivery system based on needle/groove technology, just like a record player.



Launched by RCA and dubbed the CAPACITANCE ELECTRONIC DISC (CED), it was quickly supplanted by both commercially available VHS tapes and Laserdiscs, the precursor to the DVD, which read the information with light beams.

Ultimately, it was a clunky, inelegant technology prone to problems and RCA lost about $600 million on it, but there was a curious upside to its brief arc through the collective consciousness...the cover art.

For many of the CED packages, promotional artwork was commissioned for the face of the cartridge that was singular for the release of the RCA SelectaVision format. 

Below I have displayed a gallery of some of the cover art from that time, in most cases, different images than were ever seen on the more popular VHS, Laserdisc or DVD releases of the same films. 

Enjoy the beauty!


CED amityville horror josh brolin selectavisionboxcar bertha barbara hershey





    

















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Album Picks: Panda Bear, California X

Posted by Billy Gil, January 13, 2015 09:33am | Post a Comment

Panda Bear Panda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper

panda bear meets the grim reaper lpPanda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper has us in heaven. It’s Noah Lennox’s most accessible album thus far, yet it’s as strange and unique as anything he’s done. I first heard “Boys Latin” on edibles in Joshua Tree at his excellent show at Pappy & Harriet’s with Peaking Lights, and that rainbow vocal pastiche has been swimming through my brain ever since. The other single, “Mr Noah,” is more of a grower, but I love the way its groans into life and pulsates like a live animal. You’ve got songs like “Principe Real,” which is like this Wonderland funk track, bouncing on handclaps and cartoonish organs. A lot of the in-between songs are as beautiful as you might guess. “Crossword” is heartfelt and gorgeous, along the lines of a certain song he wrote for Animal Collective, “My Girls.” “Come to Your Senses” swirls with slithering, shaking sounds, but percolating guitars and synths carry strong melodies to take you through it. And “Tropic of Cancer” is a Beach Boys-inspired oceanic ode that crests on beautiful harp and digital whispers. Panda Bear’s work has always been inspiring, but Grim Reaper sees Lennox shedding any kind of shyness present in his previous releases. It’s a beautifully made, all-embracing piece of experimental pop music, and one of the best releases of early 2015.

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MLK Jr Day 2015 Events in the Bay and LA

Posted by Billyjam, January 12, 2015 05:14pm | Post a Comment

With this year being the 50th anniversary of the historic 1965 Selma to Montgomery freedom marches this year's MLK Jr Day 2015 events all over the country will take on extra importance. There are countless events happening all over the US and California. Here a handful of those taking place in LA and the Bay Area including a comic book event in San Francisco.

MLK Jr Day 2015 is day two of the Black Comix Arts Festival whose goal is to celebrate the creativity and subjectivity of African Americans in the comic arts and popular visual culture. Open to all ages, it will include a grand exposition, special guest artist presentations, film screening, and activities for kids. The event kicks off the day before (Sunday, January 18) and happens both days at the San Francisco Public Library's main library and at the Metreon. More information and times click here.

Day of service in Oakland. Something that's become increasingly popular over the years is inviting folks (with the day off work or school) to participate in a day of service - typically doing clean up work on public beaches or parks. Tapping into that theme is the MLK Day of Service 2015 at Shepherds Canyon, Oakland where the goal of the day is to transforming "a former dump into a place of natural beauty." Takes place on MLK Jr Day from 9am to 12:30pm. Volunteers should meet at the Escher Gate, 5881 Escher Drive, Oakland. More info.

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Music History Monday: January 12

Posted by Jeff Harris, January 12, 2015 10:57am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: January 12, 1946 - Keyboardist and producer extraordinaire George Duke (born in San Rafael, CA). Happy Birthday to this brilliant artist on what would have been his 69th Birthday.
 


On this day in music history: January 12, 1939 - Pioneering vocal group The Ink Spots record "If I Didn't Care" at the Decca Recording Studio in New York City, NY. Written by Jack Lawrence, it is the first major hit record for the legendary vocal group. Formed in Indianapolis, IN in 1934 as The Four Riff Brothers, the group's original line up consists of Orville "Hoppy" Jones, Ivory "Deek" Watson, Jerry Daniels, and Charlie Fuqua. After the group perform at the Apollo Theater in Harlem the same year, their name will be changed to The 4 Ink Spots by legendary bandleader Paul Whiteman. The group will shorten their name to The Ink Spots and will record several singles for Victor Records, none of which will be commercially successful. A major turning point for the group will occur in 1936 with the departure of founding member Jerry Daniels, who is replaced by Bill Kenny as lead singer. Kenny's unique high tenor voice and vocal style will lift The Ink Spots to international stardom. The group will sign with Decca Records in late 1938, and will quickly see their fortunes turn around. "If I Didn't Care" will be among the first sides they cut for the label. After its release in February of 1939, it will become one of the biggest selling singles in the history of Decca Records, peaking at #2 on the Pop singles chart and selling over nineteen million copies worldwide, only being surpassed by Bing Crosby's "White Christmas." The Ink Spots distinctive vocal style will be hugely influential on rhythm & blues and Doo Wop vocal groups who will emerge in the coming decades. "If I Didn't Care" will have lasting popularity over several generations having been used in commercials, television, and period films including over the opening credits to The Shawshank Redemption in 1994. Comedian Redd Foxx will often quote the song on the sitcom Sanford & Son. The Ink Spots original recording of "If I Didn't Care" is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1987.

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