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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: Remembering Producer Paul C McKasty

Posted by Billyjam, February 17, 2015 09:30pm | Post a Comment
For this week's Hip-Hop History installment we pay tribute to one of hip-hop's greatest (albeit little known and way under-appreciated) producers; Paul C McKasty or Paul C as he was professionally known. Hailing from the Rosedale area of Queens, New York City, Paul produced the likes of the Ultramagnetic MC's, Eric B & Rakim, Stezo, Biz Markie, Main Source, Too Poetic, and Mikey D & The LA Posse to name but a small fraction of those he worked in the studio with. It was care of these and dozens upon dozens of other records where hip-hop fanatics, who closely read the credits on 12" record labels and LP and single's back covers, learned of this influential figure who gets little love in the big scheme of things (as well as not always getting credited on all the records he produced and worked on) when it comes to honoring hip-hop history's past back in the 1980's. However within hip-hop circles comprised of crate diggers and diehard appreciators of the art Paul C, a producer whose accolades include being a mentor to a young Large Professor, is a major figure of great importance; an artist of legendary status who was a highly influential producer - an unassuming Caucasian dude who is highly revered for the work - as both engineer and producer - in his all too short but prolific lifetime. Paul C's life came to shocking premature halt when in 1989, at the young age of 24, he was shot and killed in an unsolved murder. In his prolific lifetime the long list of records that Paul C worked on, including the ones he engineered as well as exclusively produced, would fill several pages so rather than list them all here, instead I've included below the excellent, albeit low budget, Pritt Kalsi directed Memories of Paul C McKasty documentary that cross-references many of the records Paul worked on and features in-depth interviews with several key hip-hop figures, including Rakim, whose lives he touched in his short lifetime.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Slimkid3 & DJ Nu-Mark

Posted by Amoebite, February 17, 2015 06:35pm | Post a Comment

Slimkid3 NuMark

Slimkid3 (aka Trevant "Tre" Hardson) is a founding member of seminal alternative hip-hop group The Pharcyde, as well as a solo performer and producer. He started his performing career as a member of Two Slimkid3 Numarkfor Two, a dance group best known for appearing on In Living Color. In 2002, Slimkid3 released Liberation, his first solo album after leaving The Pharcyde. Mark Potsic, a.k.a. DJ Nu-Mark, is a hip-hop producer, owner of Hot Plate Records, and member of Jurassic 5. He released his first solo album in 2004, an instrumental EP Blend Crafters. He has worked with J-Live, Aloe Blacc, Charles Bradley, and the Lonely Island. In 2014, he and Slimkid3 collaborated on their self-titled album, Slimkid3 & DJ Nu-Mark (Delicious Vinyl).

The dynamic duo recently did some record shopping at Amoeba Hollywood. In this "What's In My Bag?" episode Slimkid3 finds a few house and soul gems to add to his collection while Nu-Mark, the consumate record collector, digs up some funky breaks and world music collections. DJ Nu-Mark kicks things off on a hunch and picks up a copy of Jimmy McGriff's Flyin' Time. Slimkid3 follows that with Meshell Ndegeocello's latest release, Comet, Come To Me. From Snoop Dog and Dam-Funk's 7 Days of Funk project to house music singer Lisa Shaw, Slimkid and Nu-Mark dig deep!

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Next First Fridays Show at L.A.'s Natural History Museum Features JMSN on March 6

Posted by Amoebite, February 17, 2015 04:49pm | Post a Comment

jmsn

The next First Fridays at L.A.'s Natural History Museum will feature electro-soul singer JMSN along with up-and-comer starRo on March 6. The music starts at 8 p.m., with DJs and discussions beforehand, starting at 5 p.m. Tickets are $18 without a membership to the museum. Say hi at the Amoeba booth and pick up some swag!

Singer/songwriter and producer JMSN (pronounced Jameson, born Christian Berishaj) makes moody soul jams along the lines of How to Dress Well and The Weeknd. He released his debut record in 2012, †Priscilla†, which got the attention of rapper Kendrick Lamar, who put JMSN on four tracks on his critically acclaimed debut, good kid, m.A.A.d city. JMSN also operates his own studio, White Room Records, and has worked with the the likes of The Game, J. Cole, Tyga and Ab-Soul. JMSN released his second, self-titled album in December. Watch his recently released video for "Score" below:

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The Doors Were "Stupid" and The Beatles Were "Garbage" - According To Lou Reed

Posted by Billyjam, February 17, 2015 02:29pm | Post a Comment
     

Lou Reed "never liked the Beatles.” In fact he strongly disliked them. “I thought they were garbage," said the Velvet Underground singer/writer with a BA in English who shared how he always had, "wanted to write the great American novel but I also loved rock and roll." All of these quotes (and more) come from a rarely heard March 1987 interview Reed, who died of liver disease in October 2013, conducted with journalist Joe Smith that was found in The Joe Smith Collection at the Library of Congress. Conducted almost exactly 28 years ago the interview was recently acquired by PBS who animated it and published it to YouTube earlier today as the latest installment in their ongoing Blank on Blank series - published under the title Lou Reed on Guns & Ammo | Blank on Blank. In the audio interview, in which Reed comes off as mostly grumpy and pretentious, he says that in addition to hating the Fab Four that he also hated some of his adoring fans - especially those who made the mistake of tracking him down to his "out of the wilds of nowhere" New Jersey home address at the time and trekking out to it in the hope of meeting their music hero. "I got out with my shotgun. This is hunting country out there. You better run" - he warns.  Elsewhere in the audio interview, that as well being animated was also subtitled, Reed expresses his disgust of The Doors ("stupid") while maintaining that the goal of Velvet Underground was steadfastly to, "elevate the rock and roll song and take it where it hadn’t been taken before" - adding that no other group came close to the VU's level in his opinion ("The other stuff couldn’t come up to our ankles"). The animated interview is above while the full original audio interview is free via iTunes from the Joe Smith Library of Congress page - here where it was initially made free to the public last April, and where other interviews by Joe Smith include one with Paul McCartney and another with George Harrison who, it should be noted, do not talk shit on Lou Reed or the VU.

Album Picks: Mourn, A Place to Bury Strangers, Jose Gonzalez, Six Organs of Admittance, Ibeyi, Sonny & the Sunsets

Posted by Billy Gil, February 17, 2015 09:55am | Post a Comment

MournMourn

mourn lpCatalonian teen quartet Mourn makes a passionate racket on their debut album. Singer Jazz Rodriguez Bueno channels PJ Harvey with her raspy delivery and more cutting lyrics on tracks like “Dark Issues,” or a young Siouxsie, on the way she can play with emotions but still bring a smile to your face, on songs like galloping opener “Your Brain is Made of Candy.” Her band keeps things terse, inspired by the likes of Nirvana and The Ramones, yet their clean guitars and neat grooves on standouts like “Philliphius” and “Otitis” suggest wisdom beyond their years. A handful of tracks read as more juvenile alt-rock exercises, yet Mourn also never loses momentum, bashed out with a live-tracked, Steve Albini feel and the animated precision of off-the-cuff ideas rehearsed and captured in one raw take—Bueno’s wail at the end of bonus track “Boys Are Cunts” feels both visceral and well-timed. It’s an incredibly promising debut that puts our faith back in so-called wasted youth.

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