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Robben Ford Comes to The GRAMMY Museum March 30

Posted by Amoebite, March 11, 2015 10:23am | Post a Comment

rubben ford the grammy museum

Amoeba is proud to sponsor The Drop: Robben Ford on March 30 at The GRAMMY Museum.

The blues guitarist will appear for a discussion about his career and new album, Into the Sun, which is out March 31. Tickets are $20 and are on sale now. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. at The GRAMMY Museum's Clive Davis Theater.

Robben Ford has had an illustrious career in which he has collaborated with the likes of Miles Davis, Joni Mitchell, George Harrison and KISS. He's been nominated for five GRAMMYs and was named one of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of the 20th Century" by Musician magazine. His most recent solo albumm, 2014's A Day in Nashville, peaked at No. 2 on BIllboard's Top Blues Album chart. The upcoming Into the Sun features guest appearances by blues musician Keb' Mo', pedal steel guitarist Robert Randolph, singer/songwriter ZZ Ward, Warren Haynes of The Allman Brothers Band/Gov't Mule and many more into an album that fuses elements of jazz, pop, blues and rock.

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The Vinyl Frontier #4 - Collecting Black Gospel Music

Posted by Joe Goldmark, March 10, 2015 07:02pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

A friend said that gospel music was soul music for black folk and that mainstream soul music was music made for a white audience. The implication being that if you wanted to hear music with real soul, listen to gospel.
 

Fantastic Violinaires The Fantastic Violinaires with an incredible live version of “Children Are You Ready.”


Generally speaking, gospel reflected whatever musical trend was happening in R&B music. Gospel music was a little rougher and less polished than secular music, and of course the theme was religious, but otherwise it was relatively easy for artists to cross back and forth between the two styles. And besides, most black pop and soul artists grew up singing in the church.
 

Dorothy Love Coates and the Gospel Harmonettes Dorothy Love Coates and the Gospel Harmonettes, "Thats Enough."


 


The Staple Singers, Mavis Staples The Staple Singers with Mavis Staples on lead vocal, “Sit Down Servant.”

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Essential Records: Broadcast's 'Tender Buttons'

Posted by Billy Gil, March 10, 2015 05:07pm | Post a Comment

Essential Records Broadcast Tender Buttons

Defunct British duo Broadcast has most of their catalog reissued this week, including Tender Buttons. The band’s haunting third album is undoubtedly their high-water mark. Released in 2005, it slowly but surely raised the band’s profile, landing on several year-end best-of lists, drawing more attention to their previous albums and putting them at the upper echelon of independent artists, before their career was tragically cut short by the death of singer Trish Keenan.

I first heard Broadcast while perusing said year-end lists. (Also, wow to a list of albums so good that this is only No. 22; the early-to-mid-2000s are more than due for a resurgence.) But Broadcast’s tasteful oddity of an album somehow outlasts any other record made that year.

The key to Tender Buttons’ (and Broadcast’s) continuing endurance is how unassuming it is. Fourteen trim tracks (save five-minute noise piece “Arc of a Journey”) that actually sound like they were made by two people, using instruments that sound like they were found through a year’s worth of estate sales, Tender Buttons avoids sounding pretentious because it never really claims to be more than it is, Gertrude Stein references and all. It’s a record that remains mysterious even though all of its elements are basically at the forefront. Keenan’s vocals remain clarion despite getting plenty of the reverb treatment, thanks to her erudite British diction. All those moogs that sound like they’re falling apart, stitched together by James Cargill’s web-like guitarwork and pumping basslines, even those roaring in the background, you can pretty much hear it all, yet it feels like facing mirrors stretching to infinity, given the sense of space their layering allows.

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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: 1988, The Year Considered By Many As Hip-Hop's Greatest

Posted by Billyjam, March 10, 2015 03:00pm | Post a Comment

For this week's Hip-Hop History installment we rewind back to wonderfully vibrant year of 1988. It was a time when hip-hop still constantly growing, with exciting sounding new artists constantly unfurling new lyrical and musical sounds. To me '88 was part of the third wave of hip-hop - with the first wave being the (original) old school artists of the 70's/early 80's, who were eclipsed earlier in the 80's by Run-D.M.C. who ushered in the "new school" - but who themselves in turn were eclipsed by this newer third wave of hip-hop. It often seemed (and more so in retrospect) that every record released in '88 was a good record. Of course, as with any music in any time period, there were hip-hop duds released in '88 too. However overall it is fair to say that 1988 had a larger percentage of quality, diverse-sounding, influential, and timeless hip-hop releases than many other years in the genre's four-decade history. And no wonder; it was part of the time frame known as the "golden era" of hip-hop that is widely considered to be the artistic pinnacle of the art form.   I think part of the reason for this, along with the lyrical aspect of the artform still being relatively young and still being explored by new emcees like Rakim, was the fact that sampling was at its creative peak. Remember this was in the period before the infamous 1991 landmark Gilbert O Sullivan vs Biz Markie copyright case that essentially brought an end to free range sampling, and would end up in hip-hop being a little less adventurous sounding due to all the restrictions placed on it regarding sampling.

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Sidewalk Sale at Amoeba Hollywood Saturday, March 21

Posted by Amoebite, March 10, 2015 02:47pm | Post a Comment

Sidewalk Sale at Amoeba Hollywood

Our next Sidewalk Sale at Amoeba Hollywood is Saturday, March 21 from 12pm - 5pm! We'll have huge bargains on music, movies, TV box sets, books and much more just outside the store. Heads up, we won't have a sidewalk sale next month because of Record Store Day (April 18).

On March 21, we're featuring deals on the following:

  • DVDs for $3 each, or buy three get one free
  • DVD box sets at $7 each, or two for $10
  • Blu-rays at three for $12
  • 45s at $1 each
  • Books and comics at three for $1
  • Classical deals

Plus, Hubert's will be here giving out free lemonade. Come by and save some cash on fresh goodies from Amoebal!

Sidewalk Sale at Amoeba Hollywood

Hubert's Lemonade at Amoeba

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